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Swampscott welcomes a new welcome sign

For the last five years, a Welcome to Swampscott sign has been absent. Selectman Don Hause, Jackie Kinney, of ReachArts, Anita Balliro, artist and former high school art teacher, Bruce Paradise, of Paradise Construction, and David Shear, of ReachArts unveiled the new sign Wednesday morning.
For the last five years, a Welcome to Swampscott sign has been absent. Selectman Don Hause, Jackie Kinney, of ReachArts, Anita Balliro, artist and former high school art teacher, Bruce Paradise, of Paradise Construction, and David Shear, of ReachArts unveiled the new sign Wednesday morning. (Courtesy)

SWAMPSCOTT — After nearly five years of not having one, Swampscott has a new welcome sign.

The unveiling ceremony, on the Swampscott/Lynn line, took place Wednesday morning. The sign displays original artwork painted by Anita Balliro, an artist and former Swampscott High School art teacher. Thanks to a collaboration with ReachArts, the town’s community and arts center, the display cases on both sides of the new sign will periodically change to display new locally created art pieces, according to a town press release.

“We have such talented people in Swampscott and I am excited that this sign will serve as both a welcome mat to Swampscott and a display of our residents’ talents,” Selectman Don Hause said in the press release. “Public art is such an important part of a community and I am grateful to everyone who has contributed to make this happen.”

The sign’s display case was built and donated by Swampscott resident Bruce Paradise, of Paradise Construction. With the addition of solar-powered lights, the case will be illuminated at night.

Residents interested in contributing art work for the new welcome sign can contact www.reacharts.org.

“I am humbled that our art piece has returned to its original location,” Balliro said in the release. “I am thrilled to see Swampscott embracing public art and that rotating art creations by Swampscott residents will be on display for all to enjoy. Public art is so important.”

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