Lifestyle

New Year’s resolutions: same as last year

Item Photo By OWEN O’ROURKE

Margaret Ross plans on getting her homework done in a more timely manner.

By GAYLA CAWLEY 

SWAMPSCOTT — With the New Year comes new resolutions. But some residents are regretting the resolutions they didn’t follow up on this year.

Polled outside of the Vinnin Square Panera, Swampscott and Marblehead residents stopped and thought back on what they procrastinated on this past year.

Carol Desrosier of Marblehead said she had difficulty eating healthy and exercising on a regular basis.

“It’s a resolution every year,” Desrosier said.

Beginning New Year’s, she says, she intends to follow through on that resolution.

Arilee Demakis of Swampscott said eating healthy was also something on which she procrastinated in 2015, and said it will be her resolution for 2016 as well.

Brother and sister Will Ross, Jr. and Margaret Ross, both of Marblehead, said they regularly procrastinate doing homework.

Margaret, who attends Marblehead High, said she plans on getting her homework done in a more timely fashion in the future.

“New year, new me,” she said. “I guess that’s the common phrase.”

Will, who goes to the University of Georgia, said he’s procrastinated on every assignment in college. His father, Will Ross, Sr., walked in on that part of the conversation, saying “Well, that’s nice to know.”

However, Will, Jr. said he did start working out this year and plans on getting better at school assignment procrastination.

The residents looking to follow through on their goals for the upcoming year don’t have statistics on their side. Research by the Statistic Brain Research Institute says only 8 percent of people are successful in achieving their New Year’s resolution.

Less than half, or 49 percent, have infrequent success in achieving their resolutions. Those who are younger have a higher success rate of achieving their resolutions. Thirty-nine percent of people in their 20s achieve their resolution each year, while 14 percent of people older than 50 have success, according to the Institute.


Gayla Cawley can be reached at [email protected]

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