Lynn

Police log: 5-30-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Luis Colon, 25, of 27 Essex Court, was arrested and charged with operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license and on warrants at 8:25 p.m. Sunday.

Santos Morales, of 27 Essex Court, was arrested on warrant charges of failure to stop/yield, operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license and failure to wear a seatbelt at 8:37 p.m. Sunday.

Thomas Sanchez, 20, of 23 Nahant Place, was arrested and charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and no inspection/sticker at 7:40 p.m. Sunday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 11:42 a.m. Sunday at 16 Springvale Ave.; at 12:50 p.m. Friday at Superior Roast Beef at 200 Lynnfield St.; at 3:55 p.m. Sunday at 371 Boston St.; at 5:55 p.m. Sunday at Cottage and Linden streets; at 8:50 p.m. Sunday at 20 Park St.; at 9:35 p.m. Sunday at 12 Park St.; at 11:59 p.m. Sunday at Franklin and Hanover streets; at 3:19 a.m. Monday on Lynn Shore Drive; at 11:23 a.m. Monday at Boston and Hamilton streets.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 5:29 p.m. Sunday at 12 Hammond St.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 9:02 p.m. Sunday at Essex and Washington streets.

Assaults

A report of an assault and battery at 10:40 p.m. Sunday on Shepard Street; at 11:48 p.m. Sunday on Central Avenue.

A report of an assault at 12:07 a.m. Monday on Pinkham Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 10:44 a.m. Sunday at Walmart at 780 Lynnway; at 11:25 a.m. Sunday at 37 Elm St.; at 1:18 p.m. Sunday at East Coast International Church at 65 Munroe St.; at 1:47 p.m. Sunday at 17 Morton Hill Ave.; at 6:18 p.m. Sunday at Shelter at 100 Willow St.; at 8:07 p.m. Sunday on Willow Street; at 8:35 p.m. Sunday at Cottage and Summer streets; at 10:57 p.m. Sunday on Shepard Street; at 11:24 p.m. Sunday at 38 Hanover St.; at 11:41 p.m. Sunday at Essex and West Green streets; at 12:43 a.m. Monday at Domino’s Pizza at 341 Union St.; at 1:18 a.m. Monday at 132 Beacon Hill Ave.; at 1:53 a.m. Monday at 150 Hamilton Ave.; at 2:16 a.m. Monday at 170 Union St.; at 6:08 a.m. Monday at Stop & Shop at 35 Washington St.; at 9:22 a.m. Monday at 224 Washington St.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 10:44 a.m. Sunday on Lynnfield Street.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 4:06 a.m. Monday at 43 Fuller St.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 11:25 a.m. Sunday at 32 Baker St.

A report of vandalism at 9:30 p.m. Sunday at 167 North Common St.; at 12:29 a.m. Monday at 136 Central Ave.; at 8:43 a.m. Monday at 42 Baker St.

Police log: 5-28-17


MARBLEHEAD

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 10:02 p.m. Sunday on Foster Street. A caller reported hearing a vehicle speed up and then a loud crash by the Eastern Yacht Club. Police couldn’t find an accident; at 3:17 a.m. Monday on Devereux Street. A caller reported a pole came down across from her house, and a tree possibly came with it. A car was found on the other side of the incident.

Complaints

A caller reported he found a needle on the beach at 11:47 a.m. Sunday on Beacon Street.

A report of a band at a neighborhood party at 5 p.m. Sunday on Greystone Road. A caller reported there was a neighborhood party that night at his residence, and the band “Better Than Nothing” was playing. All of the neighbors had been notified, but he was afraid that if word got out that the band was playing, groupies may show up and make the gathering much larger than anticipated. He would call if he felt that was happening.

A report of a fight at 1:04 a.m. Monday at Marion Road and Humphrey Street. A caller reported a fight between two men in their 20s, but no weapons were seen. The fight ended as the combatants moved on.

A caller reported a middle-aged man came to her front door, opened it, and then spoke to her at 4:10 a.m. Monday on Ocean Avenue. She couldn’t remember the words and no vehicle was seen. He may have said something about the address.

Fire

A report of a large outside fire at 3:26 p.m. Sunday on Orchard Street. A large fire was reported near the fence and close to the house.

Theft

A report of a stolen iPhone at 10:52 p.m. Sunday on Leicester Road.


PEABODY

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 9:27 p.m. Sunday at Treadwell’s Ice Cream Stand at 46 Margin St.; at 12:06 a.m. Monday at 91 Lynn St. and 2 County St. Jonathan L. Tejeda, 25, of 56 Delle Ave., Apt. 10, Roxbury, was summoned for leaving the scene of property damage; at 12:41 p.m. Monday at 79 Lowell St. and 2 Sawyer St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 10:53 a.m. Monday at 23 Avalon Drive.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at 4:46 p.m. Sunday on Wilson Square. An off-duty officer reported he saw a male walking down 114 without a bike and then noticed him riding a mountain bike. It was unknown whether the bike was stolen or not. Police spoke with the two people involved, who stated they were returning the bike to Vet’s Park to another male; at 5:35 p.m. Sunday at 9 Magnolia Way. A caller reported a person was going through the dumpster. An officer reported the person was scraping through the dumpster and was sent on his way; at 2:56 a.m. Monday at 17 Bresnahan St. An unknown person reportedly tried to open the door. When the homeowner yelled, the person left in an unknown direction

A report of a disturbance at 9:36 p.m. Sunday at 8 George Road; at 9:52 p.m. Sunday at 15 Sewall St.; at 11:19 p.m. Sunday at 23 Oak Ave. An officer spoke with people, who stated they had just come back from a cookout and there was no fight. The caller reported there was a loud disturbance and fighting. He stated he heard a woman say she had a gun; at 4:41 a.m. Monday at 43 North Central St.

A man was reportedly dressed in scrubs with a clown’s mask on, heading to Main Street on Washington Street at 2:36 p.m. Monday. The activity was reported as suspicious.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 7:09 p.m. Sunday on Gardner Street. A caller reported a man wasn’t breathing. The man was taken to Salem Hospital. The CPAC unit was notified.

Theft

A report of a robbery at 10:47 p.m. Sunday at Dunkin’ Donuts at 3 Central St. A caller reported he was at a cookout and was robbed of money at gunpoint. The caller later reported there were three guns involved. Police checked on an address at Smidt Avenue and were unable to find the suspect. The original report was unfounded. Police spoke with the caller who was sent on his way to his residence in Salem.  

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 4:55 p.m. Sunday at 12 Carol Ann Road. A caller reported his house was egged.

Saugus ready to leap

The town is wasting no time in launching one of the most ambitious local public school building projects undertaken in Massachusetts in recent years.

With a price tag of $186 million, the three-school project rivals the unsuccessful attempt by Lynn public officials three months ago to build two new middle schools. Like their Lynn counterparts, Saugus officials are asking town voters to approve the school projects and the spending associated with them.

Unlike Lynn officials, Saugus leaders hold an ace when it comes to convincing town residents why the massive school project makes sense. Saugus has a AA+ bond rating that local officials claim “will save the taxpayers of Saugus an estimated $7.2 million” in borrowing costs.

But that estimated savings is only part of the equation officials are presenting residents in their bid to win voter approval for the school projects on June 20.

Town leaders are asking voters to endorse a school building plan that harnesses the town’s advantageous borrowing position with a state reimbursement formula that has residents investing 30 cents on the dollar into school construction.

Meeting to consider Saugus school vote

The city of Lynn’s uneasy financial situation, including worries about layoffs, put city leaders behind the proverbial eight ball even as they attempted to show voters why building two new middle schools made sense.

A small fraction of Lynn residents went to the polls in March and squashed the two-school proposal and a tax increase to pay for it. Saugus town leaders aren’t showing any signs they are worried about bringing their three-school plan with its mix of state and local funding and new construction and renovations to the voters.

It’s not a huge stretch for municipal leaders sitting on a stellar bond rating to tell voters top-notch schools will improve their town’s already-rosy financial picture. The easiest analogy is spending money on a home in anticipation of bolstering the property’s market value.

School spending critics — and it’s never hard to find a critic in Saugus — will crow about tax hikes and spending money on a school megaproject. But Saugus isn’t just planning to build a new middle-high school and renovate Belmonte and Veterans Memorial schools. The town construction plan is based on a bold concept for realigning public education in the town.

The plan calls for a pre-kindergarten to second grade school and a grade three to grade five school called an “upper elementary” school. Those primary school education ideas combined with the middle-high school concept give Saugus a chance to tailor education programs to the phases children and adolescents go through on their way to young adulthood.

The message town leaders are delivering to residents in advance of the June 20 vote is that Saugus stands on the threshold of becoming a top-flight school district. They are asking residents to take a quantum leap into the future and it’s a safe bet town residents will make the jump.

Can we have nice things?

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
One Dollar Zone has opened on the Lynnway.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Another dollar store has opened on the Lynnway as the city solidifies its place for discount retailers.

“Those kind of stores expand to locations that cost nothing to open, where they don’t pay their workers much and the demographics fit,” said Michael Tesler, a marketing lecturer at Bentley University.  “Lynn has lots of newer immigrants without much money who prefer dollar stores to Target and Walmart.”

Lynn already has its share of discount retailers. There are three Family Dollar shops, two Dollar Tree stores, and One Dollar Zone has opened its second store at the former Sleepy’s on the Lynnway. That doesn’t include a number of other independent cut-rate shops such as J & M Dollar Store.

Where else can you get glassware, candy, cleaning supplies, snacks, toys, party supplies, stationery, crafts, books, automotive products, pet supplies and seasonal goods for just $1 each?

Tesler said the immediate prospects of attracting upscale shops to Lynn seems remote.  MarketStreet, the premium open-air shopping destination in Lynnfield which boasts more than 80 shops and restaurants, offers the kind of retail some would like to see in Lynn, including Victoria’s Secret, Williams-Sonoma and Lucky Brand Jeans.

“Lynn lost its way, it has an image problem and the downtown deteriorated,” Tesler said.  “When I was a kid, my mother’s favorite shopping trip was to Hoffman’s in the downtown, and there used to be a place called Roland’s for ice cream and that was a magnet. But those kinds of retail attractions are missing today.”

Tell us what you want to see more of in Lynn.

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Still, it’s not an impossible dream to transform Lynn’s waterfront. Consider Assembly Square, renamed Assembly Row, in Somerville.

“Assembly Square should be an inspiration for Lynn,” Tesler said. “At one time, the area was infested with rats and lacked  access to the Mystic River. Today, it’s a new neighborhood with waterfront apartments, outlet shopping, a new stop on the MBTA’s Orange Line and office space for Partners HealthCare.

“Lynn needs a real strong community effort like in Somerville,” he said.

Mark Browne, a Boston commercial real estate broker, said the city’s perception is that of dollar stores, check cashing shops, and feeding the kids with fast food for $5.

“It’s very challenging to change people’s view of a city,” he said.

Still, he said Lynn is not the only community with an underdeveloped waterfront.

“Look at Providence’s waterfront,” he said. “It’s lined with oil tanks and refineries.”  

Ward 6 City Councilor Peter Capano, whose district includes the Lynnway, said the proliferation of dollar stores does not fit his idea of what the neighborhood could be.

“This is absolutely not the kind of development we want to see there,” he said.

While he prefers more upscale shops, Capano said those businesses do not want to be in Lynn. But he’s not sure how to fix it.

“I’d rather see a Guitar Center,” said Capano about the California-based retailer that calls itself the world’s largest musical instrument chain. “But they haven’t chosen to come here.”

As Trahant steps down, others step up

It’s clear, he said, Lynn residents wants these stores and that’s why they’re growing.

It wasn’t supposed to be this way.

More than a decade ago, the city collaborated with Sasaki Associates to create a master plan to guide development on the Lynnway. The Watertown-based planner determined the Lynnway waterfront could accommodate 4 million square feet of apartments and condominiums, 2 million square feet of retail, office, hotel and light manufacturing, 5,000 permanent jobs and generate $18 million in real estate tax revenues.

But so far, it’s still a dream. While three projects totaling $649 million are in the works that would bring waterfront apartments to the Lynnway, a shovel has yet to go into the ground.

And despite creation of the Lynn Economic Advancement and Development Team (LEAD) in late 2015, the high-powered working group intended to jumpstart development by aligning federal, state and local stakeholders, there’s little to show for its efforts.

Capano said he’s frustrated. But the city can’t do much if developers don’t come to the city with a proposal or if a landlord leases space to a dollar store.

“What do I say to the guy who has had empty building on the Lynnway for two years?” he asked. “For example, we don’t allow auto repair shops on the Lynnway, but we can’t stop one retailer and allow another. They would go to court and win.”

James Cowdell, executive director of the Economic Development and Industrial Corp. (EDIC/Lynn), reiterated there’s not much the city can do to prevent such stores from opening.

“If we could write legislation to restrict those stores, I would be the first to do it,” he said. “They cheapen what we’re trying to do. But they are allowed as of right.”

Jen Cookke, a professor at the MIT Center for Real Estate, disagrees that the city is powerless.  She said communities have a number of tools at their disposal to guide development.

“The city holds a lot of the cards, but it takes courage for city leaders to uphold the master plan,” she said.  “Officials have the ability to create incentives such as tax breaks if the owner brings a mixed-use development. You just need one outlier and others will follow. For a community that is innovative and has vision, the sky’s the limit.”


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

 

As Trahant steps down, others step up

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
“I’ll still be around,” longtime City Councilor William Trahant says.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN William Trahant knew something was wrong last fall when he was boating on Tripp Pond at his camp in Poland, Maine.

“I could feel pain in my chest, started sweating and had all the symptoms of a heart attack,” said the Ward 2 City Councilor.

Minutes later he was rushed to a local hospital where doctors confirmed his instincts. He was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital and underwent successful triple bypass surgery.

It was a life-changing moment for the 57-year-old contractor who has served on the Council for nine terms. He knew it was time to quit and not seek reelection.

“I’m not a quitter and I’ll still be around, but I need to do this for my health and for my family,” he said.

It didn’t take long for candidates to line up to replace him.

Alexander Zapata, a former candidate for state representative who couldn’t get enough signatures to run against Daniel Cahill, had already pulled papers. He could not be reached for comment.

Mac gets a city salute

Last week, Gina O’Toole, a 51-year-old teacher’s aide in the Lynn Public Schools, joined the race.   

“Over the years, I’ve noticed lots of things that needed to be done in the neighborhood and people always tell me to call the ward councilor,” she said. “As a councilor, I will be able to contribute to the community in a way that I can’t as a regular citizen.”

O’Toole said her neighbors are concerned about the lack of traffic lights on Eastern and Western avenues, road conditions in the ward and Floating Bridge Pond needs to be cleaned.  

Rick Starbard, 53, owner of Rick’s Auto Collision in Revere, also tossed his hat in the ring.

“I didn’t plan on running,” he said. “But when Billy decided not to seek re-election, that promoted my phone to ring off the hook with people encouraging me to run and I decided to do it.”

Starbard, a former School Committeeman who was defeated in a bid for an at-large councilor seat two years ago, said experience as a business owner will benefit the council.

“The key to balancing our budget is to expand our commercial tax base and fund public safety,” said the former teacher at Lynn Vocational Technical Institute. “We need to do more to attract business and industry to the city.”


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Nahant police officer assaulted by teen

NAHANT — A Nahant police officer was assaulted by a teenager driving a stolen car on Saturday night.

Shortly before 11 p.m., the officer was investigating a suspicious car in the Bass Point area of Nahant. Two male teenagers were in the car, which was reported stolen out of Brockton, said police who recovered the car.

The driver physically assaulted the officer before running away. The officer is recovering from minor injuries. The passenger was taken into custody at the scene, police said.

The suspect was apprehended four hours later, with assistance from Lynn and Swampscott police, along with K9 units from State and Manchester by the Sea police.

A 15-year-old juvenile was held at a Youth Detention Services unit. An 18-year-old male was held without bail at the Middleton House of Correction, police said.

Police log: 5-28-17

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Michael Bills, of 11 Nichols St., was arrested on warrant charges of breaking and entry, malicious damage to a motor vehicle, and larceny at 12:36 p.m. Saturday.

Davoni Boyd, 19, of 145 Lewis St., was arrested and charged with violation of the city knife ordinance at 2:39 p.m. Friday.

Alexander Castillo, 28, of 37 Everett St., was arrested and charged with trafficking cocaine, Class A drug distribution, drug violation near a school, conspiracy to violate drug laws, possession to distribute, and possession to distribute Class B drugs at 4:09 p.m. Saturday.

Darryl Eaton, 25, of 4 Kingsley Terrace, was arrested and charged with drug possession with intent to distribute at 2:38 p.m. Friday.

Jered Jones, 37, of 3 North Maine St., was arrested and charged with trafficking heroin, drug violation near a school, conspiracy to violate drug law, and possession of class B drugs at 2:08 p.m. Saturday.

Ryan Maguire, 29, of 147 Reddington St., Swampscott, was arrested and charged with operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license, speeding, and failure to have an inspection sticker at 2:52 a.m. Saturday.

Stefan Maniscalco, of 60 Gardiner St., was arrested on warrant charges for speeding, leaving scene of damaged property, negligent of a motor vehicle, keeping right for oncoming motor vehicle and failure to be in possession of a license, improper turn, second offense OUI for drugs, failure to stop for police, possession of drugs with intent to distribute, possession of Class B and Class E drugs at 11:21 a.m. Sunday.

Steven Matthis, 36, of 5 Ireson St., Saugus, was arrested and charged with operation of a motor vehicle with a revoked license at 6:34 p.m. Saturday.

Matthew McAlister, 31, of 29 Benson Road., Buckfield, was arrested and charged with trafficking heroin, drug violation near a school, possession of Class B, and conspiracy to violate drug laws at 2:09 p.m. Saturday.

Nahomy Navarro, 18, of 22 Trinity Ave.,  was arrested and charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, domestic assault and battery, and resisting arrest at 1:08 a.m. Saturday. 

Matthew Quon, of 3 N. Common Terrace, was arrested on warrant charges for larceny and conspiracy at 7:01 p.m. Saturday.

Theresa Seigart, 24, of 48 Johnson St., was arrested and charged with trafficking cocaine, possession with intent to distribute drugs, conspiracy to violate drug laws, and drug violation near a school at 3:52 p.m. Saturday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 10:14 a.m. Saturday at 156 Boston St.; at 6:14 p.m. at 32 Trinity Ave.; at 6:37 p.m. at 71 Chatham St.; motor vehicle accident with a hit and run at 10:49 p.m. at 98 Wyman St.; at 7:17 a.m. Sunday at 97 Empire St.; at 7:45 a.m. Saturday at 97 Empire St.; at 10:25 a.m. Sunday at Boston and Stetson streets.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with injured person at 10:50 a.m. Saturday at Ashland and Summer streets; at 11:55 a.m. Saturday at Andrew and Market streets.

Assaults

A report of an assault and battery at 8:41 p.m. Saturday on Broadway.

A report of assault and battery with a deadly weapon at 11:16 a.m. Saturday on Broad Street.

Breaking and Entering

A report of breaking and entering at 2:17 a.m. Saturday at 71 Curwin Circle; at 5:58 p.m. Saturday at 141 Tracy Ave.

Complaints

A report of a fight at 9:09 p.m. Saturday at 116 Central Ave.; at 7:05 a.m. Sunday at Shorey and Union streets;  

A report of gunshots at 12:36 a.m. Saturday at Green and Violet streets; at 1:17 a.m. Saturday at Broad and Green streets, at 4:32 p.m. Saturday at 379 Chestnut St.

Fire

A report of a 1 alarm fire at 6:34 p.m Saturday at 61 Elm St.; at 11:06 p.m. on Bulfinch Street; at 11:50 p.m. Saturday at 80 Franklin St.; at 12:44 Sunday at 23 Archer St.; at 7:05 a.m. Sunday at 131 Johnson St..

Theft

A report of larceny at 4:59 p.m. Saturday 498 Essex St.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 2:31 a.m. Saturday at 26 Autumn St.; at 10:45 a.m. Saturday at 298 Union St.; at 9:45 p.m. Saturday at 280 South Common St.

A report of vandalism to a motor vehicle at 7:43 a.m. Saturday at 57 Sheridan St.; at 8:31 a.m. Saturday at 28 Parrott St.; at 12:46 p.m. Saturday at Building 19 at 810 Lynnway; at 8:34 a.m. Sunday at 29A N. Common St.;


MARBLEHEAD

Arrests 

Daniel A Dyer, 49, of 144 Washington St., Apt. 2, Peabody, was arrested on warrants at 10:35 a.m. Saturday.

Janet M. McNulty Newman, 66, of 1 Beacon Heights Lane, was arrested and charged with OUI liquor and reckless operation of a motor vehicle at 8:47 p.m. Friday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 8:07 p.m. Friday at Tedesco and Maple streets; at 10:20  a.m. Saturday on Pleasant Street;

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at 11:45 a.m. Friday. The caller reports that a 4 door station wagon pulled into the parking lot at Doaks Lane. Caller reported that one allegedly had a pencil. The caller could not make out the plates on the car. Police investigated.

A report of a man on property at 12:16 p.m. Friday on Lee Street. The owner of the property said the man is trespassing on private property since there is a latch on the gate. The caller reported that she saw the man earlier with a bag as if he was going to throw something away. She is sure he is there collecting cans. Police spoke with the person who claimed he will not come back.

A report of a concerned parent at 3:28 p.m. Friday on Jersey Street. The anonymous female called because she was concerned about an unsupervised prom after party she heard about. An officer drove by the location where everything was all in order at the time.

A report of a neighbor dispute at 6:34 p.m. Friday on Waldron Court. The caller reported an alleged device on their neighbor’s back porch which makes a noise that is designed to keep teens away. The caller reports that she can hear it and is making the dog crazy. Police went to the neighbor’s home who was not there at the time of the call. The device was eventually unplugged by police.

A report of an unwanted guest at 1:27 a.m. Sunday on Shetland Road. The caller reported that his ex-girlfriend forced her way into his resident.

A report of a fight at 3:47 p.m. Saturday at Wyman Road.

Theft

A report of stolen cash from a vehicle at 9:12 a.m. Saturday on Ruby Terrace.

A report of a grave memorial missing at 1:34 p.m. Saturday on West Shore Drive. The caller reports a plaque holding a photograph is missing from his wife’s grave.


PEABODY

Arrests 

Tommy Clark, 27, of 2910 Francis Ave., Mansfield, was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct at 8:25 p.m. Friday.

Simone Legget, 20, of 28 William St., Lynn, was arrested and charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and texting while driving at 1:45 p.m. Saturday.

Dennis Njoki, 24, of 5 Dyer Court, Apt. C1, Danvers, was arrested and charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at 10 Newbury St.; at 11:53 a.m. Saturday at 494 Lowell St.; at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at 35 Main St.; at 1:58 p.m. at 85 Lynnfield St.; at 2:55 p.m. at 46 Margin St.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with a police vehicle at 4:50 p.m. Saturday at 2 Fountain St.; at 10:35 a.m. Sunday at 33 Lake St..

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 11:53 a.m. Saturday at 2 Priscilla Lane.

A report of a hit and run motor vehicle accident at 12:39 a.m. Friday at 2 Central St.;at 3:47 p.m. Saturday at 1 Fountain St. and 33 Pierpont St.

Assaults

A report of an assault and battery at 6:11 a.m. Friday on Chestnut Street.

A report of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon at 6:30 p.m. Saturday on Washington Street.

Breaking and Entry

A report of a breaking and entry to a motor vehicle at 9:25 Saturday at 24 Margin St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 11:42 a.m. Saturday at 120 Newbury St.

A report of a verbal dispute at 2:51 a.m. Sunday at 80 Foster St.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 6:21 p.m. Saturday on Abbott Street.

Theft

A report of larceny at 1:57 p.m. Sunday at Latitude’s Sports Club at 194 Newbury St.

Vandalism

A report of a vandalism at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at 25 Reed St.


SWAMPSCOTT

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 11:36 a.m Friday at 371 Paradise Road.; at 3:07 p.m Friday at 174 Humphrey St.;  at 2:19 p.m. Saturday at 174 Humphrey St.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with an injured person at 6:42 p.m. Friday at Burrill and New Ocean streets.

A report of a hit and run motor vehicle accident at 5:58 a.m. Friday at 109 Norfolk Ave.

Complaints

A report of threats at 2:05 a.m. Sunday at 45 Pleasant St.

Fire

A report of a fire at 4:09 p.m. Saturday at 117 Essex St.

Theft

A report of larceny at 6:57 p.m. Saturday at 284 Forest Ave.

 

Warren campaigns on transportation promise

ITEM PHOTO BY JIM WILSON
City Councilor Peter Capano listens as Newton Mayor Setti Warren hold a news conference at the ferry terminal. 

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — With the harbor as a backdrop Friday, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Setti Warren promised to revitalize the city by reinstating ferry service and extending the Blue Line.

“There’s no reason why we can’t put ferry service back to Lynn,” he said. “It ran for two summers until it was cut. We need to restore it so people can get in and out of the city and expand transportation.”

The 46-year-old Newton mayor is one of three Democrats seeking the nomination for next year’s primary. Environmentalist Robert K. Massie and former Gov. Deval Patrick administration budget chief Jay Gonzalez are also in the race to unseat Gov. Charlie Baker, recently named the country’s most popular governor in a nationwide poll.

The ferry from the Blossom Street Ferry Terminal in Lynn to Boston’s Seaport operated a pilot program in 2014 and 2015. But the service was decommissioned last summer by the Baker administration, which argued it didn’t generate enough riders to justify the $700,000 in state funds annually to operate it.

On the long awaited 4.5 mile Blue Line extension from Wonderland Station in Revere into Lynn, Warren said it’s a project that’s time has come.

“The Blue Line extension has been under discussion for more than four decades and we’ve got to make sure it happens,” he said. “When the transit line is extended, that will expand Lynn’s economy. A few miles away in Boston, there are cranes on the city’s skyline and we need to make sure that spreads to Lynn.”

Warren rides the Blue Line into Lynn

While Warren did not put a price tag on the projects which studies say could exceed $1 billion, the mayor said the cost to not do them is far greater.  

“I don’t know how much they will cost, but what’s the cost if we don’t do it?” he said. “The cost of not doing it is the loss of access to high-paying jobs, not getting cars off the highway and more congestion because that’s what’s happening right now.”

To pay for these and other transportation projects, Warren is not shy about calling for new taxes and closing loopholes in the state’s tax code.

Warren said if elected governor, he will examine $12 billion in state tax credits that are lost to the treasury. In addition, he favors the so-called millionaire’s tax.  If approved by voters next year, the proposal would amend the state constitution by imposing a 4 percent surtax on incomes over $1 million. It would raise nearly $2 billion annually and the money would be designated for schools and transportation.

Warren spoke at a sparsely attended news conference in the ferry parking lot terminal on the Blossom Street Extension. City Councilors Peter Capano and Jay Walsh happened to be at the site, scouting locations for summer concerts.

“This is a big part of fixing Lynn and getting things up and connecting people to our waterfront,” said Walsh.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

A spin of a lifetime for ‘Wheel of Fortune’ fan

COURTESY PHOTO
James Magner’s episode of “Wheel of Fortune” airs at 7 p.m. May 30.

By MATT DEMIRS

LYNN How much does it cost to buy a vowel on the “Wheel of Fortune”?

Lynn native James Magner can tell you after Tuesday when he appears as a contestant on the game show.

“I’ve been trying my whole life to get on ‘Wheel of Fortune,’” he said. “I’ve been watching it since the inception every night at 7 p.m.”

Magner’s drive to become a contestant on the show was never ending. Someone who thrived at doing puzzles growing up, the 1996 Classical High School graduate would play along at home, dreaming of the day he would spin the wheel with host Pat Sajak and hostess Vanna White.

After moving to Florida, he attended “Wheel Mobile” events, pop-up stations where people try their luck in a lottery to be selected for the show.

Unfortunately for Magner, at the last event he attended, his number wasn’t drawn so he and his wife went home empty handed.

And then he got the good news.

“I saw an email one day inviting me to a private audition for ‘Wheel of Fortune’ with about 50 other people,” he said. “At first, I thought it was just a joke.”

Marshalling a plan for former school building

The interviewer told participants they would receive a letter within two weeks if they were selected. Magner doubted he would be chosen and the fact it had been weeks without receiving a letter, he was sure it was just another bust.

And then the phone rang.

“I got a call from California one day saying the letter sent by ‘Wheel of Fortune’ came back return-to-sender and that I was actually selected to be a contestant on the show during Fabulous Florida Week,” he said.

While he can’t disclose specifics on his performance until the show airs, he says you don’t want to miss it.

Magner will be flying in from Florida so he can watch his “Wheel of Fortune” debut with family in Lynn.

His father, another James Magner, said they are really excited.

“We’re going to have a little get-together at my house,” he said. “(My son) will be bringing his newly married wife and newborn son.”

Magner’s episode of “Wheel of Fortune” will air at 7 p.m. Tuesday.


Matt Demirs can be reached at mdemirs@itemlive.com.

Public Hearing on the State of Our Public Beaches

Metropolitan Beaches Commission Co-Chairs Senator Thomas M. McGee of Lynn and Rep. RoseLee Vincent of Revere invite you to share your thoughts on the state of our public beaches in Lynn, Swampscott, and Nahant at a public hearing on Tuesday evening, May 30 from 6 to 8 p.m at Lynn Museum/LynnArts on 590 Washington St. Lynn, MA 01901.

Parking is available at the museum parking lot, on the street in front, or at the META parking lot across the street.

The hearing will include:

  • Updates from Save the Harbor/EEA’s Beach Science Advisory Committee on planned improvements to water quality on King’s Beach.
  • Updates from DCR on plans to remove algae this summer.
  • Updates from the Friends of Lynn and Nahant Beach on summer program expansion.
  • Updates from the Commission on the FY2018 DCR Budget for the Metropolitan Beaches.

Following the updates, the Commission Co-Chairs, representatives of DCR and EEA, and members of the Commission including Rep. Brendan Crighton and Robert Tucker of Lynn and Town Manager Jeff Chelgren and Mounzer Aylouche of Nahant, all look forward to hearing from you.

Please direct questions and RSVPs to Maddie Clair at clair@savetheharbor.org or call 617-451-2860 ext. 1007

Police log: 5-27-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Oswaldo Acevedo, of 41 Lewis St., Lynn, was arrested and charged with violating parole at 4:37 p.m. Thursday.

Helison Benazi De Souza, 37, was arrested on warrant charges of larceny, unlicensed operation of motor vehicle, disguise to obstruct justice, electronic fund transfer violation, larceny, and credit card fraud at 2:25 p.m. Wednesday.

Nathan Harrington, 40, of 137 Broad St., was arrested and charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon at 9:46 p.m. Thursday.

Stephen Livingstone, 24, of 235 Parkland Ave., was arrested and charged with operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license at 11:25 p.m. Thursday.

Tiffany Oram, 27, of 12 Iona Terrace, was arrested and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon at 1:17 a.m. Friday.

William Penta, of 4 Pigeon Hill Rd., Brookline, was arrested on warrant charges of perjury, conspiracy and witness at 12:45 p.m Thursday.

Kevin Sanchez, 23, of 58 Walford Way, Charlestown, was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and failure to yield at an intersection at 10:55 p.m. Thursday.

Kevin Simon, 22, of 20 East Highland St., was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct at 11:19 p.m. Thursday.

Joshua Sisson, of 16 Amity St., was arrested on warrant charges of violation of parole at 10:31 a.m. Friday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 7:57 a.m. Thursday at Essex and Sheridan street; at 11:23 a.m. Thursday at Essex and Fayette streets; at 1:04 p.m Thursday at 600 Eastern Ave.; at 1:25 p.m. Thursday at 33 Munroe St.; a report of a hit and run motor vehicle accident at 2:23 p.m.Thursday at 532 Lynnfield St.; at 2:32 p.m. at Chatham and Maple streets; at 4:10 p.m., Thursday at Bradford Road and Lynnfield Street; at 4:26 p.m. Thursday at 765 Lynnfield St.; at 7:43 a.m. Friday at 126 Alley St; at 7:57 a.m. Friday at Chatham Street and Western Avenue.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with injuries at 6:23 p.m. Thursday at Lawton and Western Avenue.

Breaking and Entering

A report of breaking and entering of a motor vehicle at 10 a.m. Friday at 160 Neptune Blvd.

Fights

A report of a fight at 6:57 Thursday at 58 Conomo Ave.; at 8:48 p.m. Thursday at 161 Broad St.

Gunshot

A report of a gunshot at 2:41 p.m. at 234 Chestnut St.; at 3:11 a.m. Friday at 82 Silsbee St.

Robbery

A report of robbery at 2:33 p.m. Thursday at Central Square; at 5:16 p.m. Thursday at 263 Lynnfield St.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 5:27 p.m. Thursday at 74 Newhall St.; at 8:31 a.m. Friday at 41 Market St.

Police log: 5-26-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Complaints

A report of a damaged motor vehicle from a landscaper working in the area at 1:27 Thursday on Coolidge Road.  A report of receiving threatening texts from a family member at 4:49 Thursday on Front Street. A report of no water in the apartment 6:05 p.m. Thursday on Pleasant Street.


REVERE

Accidents

A report of a hit and run motor vehicle accident at 12:26 a.m. Thursday at 1 Beach St.; A report of a motor vehicle accident at 7:42 a.m. Thursday at VFW Parkway; at 8:16 a.m. Thursday at Copeland Circle; at 11:46 a.m. Thursday at Beach Street; a hit and run accident to property at 12:23 p.m. Thursday at 1 Beach St.; at 2:34 Thursday at North Shore Road; at 2:32 p.m. at Brown Circle; at 3:20 p.m. Thursday at Mahoney Circle; at 4:32 p.m. Thursday at Copeland Circle. A report of a motor vehicle accident with injured person at 2:21 p.m. Thursday at Lee Burbank Highway.

Breaking and Entering

A report of burglary and breaking and entering at 8:47 a.m. Thursday at Elmwood Street; at 3:09 p.m. Thursday at Mountain Avenue; at 4:56 p.m. Thursday at Revere Housing Authority on Adams Street.; at 9:03 p.m. Thursday at the Garfield School.

Recovered Stolen Vehicle

A report of a recovered stolen motor vehicle at 5:40 p.m. Thursday at Everard Street.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 8:03 p.m. Thursday at Broadway.


SAUGUS

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident with non-fatal injury at 12:26 p.m. Thursday on Salem Turnpike; at 3:35 a.m. Friday at 1143 Broadway; at 5:01 p.m. Thursday motor vehicle accident with another party leaving the scene at 564 Broadway. A report of a motor vehicle accident with non-fatal injuries at 9:04 p.m. Thursday at 140 Salem Turnpike. A report of a motor vehicle accident leaving the scene at 5:01 p.m. Thursday on 564 Broadway.

Complaints

A report of a small dog walking around the neighborhood with no owner at 12:38 p.m. Thursday on 20 Gates Road; reports a truck obstructing traffic at 1:29 p.m. Thursday at Lincoln Avenue; at 6:03 p.m. Thursday reports of a suspicious person peering into windows before walking away at 40 Springdale Ave.

Medical

A report of an elderly male who fell taken to Beverly Hospital at 1:19 p.m. Thursday from 1201 Broadway.


SWAMPSCOTT

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run at 5:58 Friday at 109 Norfolk Ave.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at 11:24 a.m. Thursday at 1005 Paradise Road.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 3:00 p.m. Thursday on Burrill Street.

 

RE/MAX Lynn Home of the Week • 15 Bow Ridge Rd, Lynn

15 Bow Ridge Rd, Lynn
Exclusively offered at $439,900

Spacious, twenty-years-young 3-bedroom, 2½ bath Colonial on a great cul-de-sac street in one of the most desirable neighborhoods. This house offers a beautiful new kitchen, generous living room with marble fire place and access to the large deck with amazing view of large back yard. Formal dining room has a door to a second deck. Gleaming hardwood floors throughout. Beautiful master bedroom has sizable closet and a recently-updated master bathroom. Special features include: 2-car garage, finished room in the basement, vinyl siding, newer windows, and close proximity to highway.

More info here: http://bit.ly/2kuDlLy

Sima Rotenberg
RE/MAX Advantage
Email: sima@rotenbergteam.com
Web: RotenbergTeam.com
781-956-2279

Warren rides the Blue Line into Lynn

ITEM FILE PHOTO
This February 2017 file photo shows Newton Mayor Setti Warren on a visit to Lynn.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Democratic candidate for governor Setti Warren promises to extend Blue Line service into the city and have millionaires pay for it.

The two-term Newton mayor will make the case for the MBTA project at Central Square Station at a campaign stop Friday morning.  

Warren, who is running to unseat Gov. Charlie Baker, is facing a challenge for the Democratic nomination from environmentalist and entrepreneur Robert K. Massie and former Gov. Deval Patrick administration budget chief Jay Gonzalez. Whoever wins, they will battle Baker, who was recently named the country’s most popular governor in a nationwide poll.

Warren, an Iraq War veteran, said he did not know how much it would cost to extend the Blue Line 4.5 miles above ground from Wonderland Station in Revere into Lynn.

“Here’s what I do know,” he asked. “The cost of not doing it is the loss of access to high-paying jobs, not getting cars off the highway and more congestion because that’s what’s happening right now.”

In 2013, the MBTA conducted a Blue Line Extension study and estimated the cost from $737 million to $1 billion.

Warren said there are at least two ways to pay for the T project. First, as governor he pledged to examine $12 billion in state tax credits that are lost to the treasury.  

“I’d look at exemptions that are in the tax code right now that gives revenue away to special interests,” he said.

Warren candidacy could connect in a blue state

The second method to raise revenue is to implement the so-called millionaire’s tax.  If approved by voters next year, the proposal would amend the state constitution by imposing a 4 percent surtax on incomes over $1 million. The money would be designated for schools and transportation.

About 20,000 or 0.5 percent of households in the state would be hit by the new tax and it would raise $1.9 billion annually, according to the state Department of Revenue.

“Transportation is a critical part of moving people back and forth to work,” Warren said. “It’s critical to get people off the roads and out of their cars. If we are not making smart investments in things like transportation and we are giving away revenue through tax exemptions, we are not being honest about how we are spending money.”

The Newton mayor also endorsed the Lynn to Boston ferry which was cut last summer amid budget problems.

“The longer we wait to make investments in things like the ferry and Blue Line, we are growing economic inequality because we are not providing Lynn with the chance to grow economically,” he said. It’s essential for the vitality of the city for these projects to move forward so Lynn can meet its full potential.”

Jacqueline Goddard, a spokeswoman for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, declined comment.

But in a visit to Lynn last year, state Transportation Secretary Stephanie Pollack said given the T’s budget troubles, the T was not building new stations on the state’s dime.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Hats off to St. Mary’s grads

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
The St. Mary’s graduating class of 2017 celebrates.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN Rain didn’t stop the 84 St. Mary’s High School graduates as officials, teachers, parents, and friends gathered at Lynn Memorial Auditorium for the Class of 2017 commencement.

“People say time flies when you’re having fun,” said Katie Cadigan, salutatorian. “Time flies during the good and the bad. It has the power to rob you, and the power to give.”

Grace Cotter Regan, head of school, advised students to look at time as it flies by and find grace moments.

Those moments provide spiritual and personal growth, she said.

“Ask yourself what lights you up as you move forward and go with what that is,” she said.

Valedictorian Michael Cerulli, who will attend Boston College in September, compared the graduation from St. Mary’s to an interview he watched with former Los Angeles Laker Kobe Bryant.

The reporter asked Bryant if he missed playing in the National Basketball Association.

“No, the NBA is always a part of me,” he said.

Cerulli’s said graduation from St. Mary’s is a lot like Bryant’s exit from the NBA.

“Although we are leaving St. Mary’s, we should never think of St. Mary’s leaving us,” he said “Everything we know stems from what we learned here.”

He went on to list the accomplishments and milestones he and his classmates achieved, such as state championships, an award-winning drama production, and the outstanding college selections of his peers.

“I’d like to think all these remarkable achievements aren’t a coincidence,” Cerulli said.

Alumnus John J. Green, who graduated in 1967, spoke to the Spartans after being in their position 50 years ago.

“Today, you join a very special club of 12,000 members,” he said. “You are an alum.”

Green discussed the changes at the school since he graduated, including the cost of St. Mary’s tuition, which was just $50 dollars in the 1960s.

“What hasn’t changed is the amount of students moving on to higher education,” he said. “In my day, we had about 95 percent of our class moving on to higher education. The same goes for today, with over 95 percent of graduates moving on to colleges and universities, a percentage that is higher than the Massachusetts average of 75 percent and the 65 percent national average.”

Regan said the environment at St. Mary’s has impacted graduates and prepared them for their next adventure.  

“There’s a culture of care, compassion, and love that differentiates St. Mary’s from any other school,” she said.


Matt Demirs can be reached at mdemirs@itemlive.com

Marshalling a plan for former school building

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN — City officials presented a plan to sell the former Thurgood Marshall Middle School on Porter Street on Thursday night, for a potential reuse that could include senior market-rate housing and a commercial component. But school officials opted to take no action.

City Council President Darren Cyr and James Lamanna, the city’s attorney, presented the option to the School Committee, requesting that the 19 Porter St. property be transferred to the Public Property Committee of the City Council to prepare a Request for Proposals (RFP) to solicit bids for its sale to a developer.

Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy, chairwoman of the School Committee, said she was looking for the committee to make a motion to approve the transfer of the site, with a minimum asking price and timeline for when that sale could be complete. If those conditions weren’t met, the property would revert back to the School Committee.

School Committee members opted to set that minimum sales price at $4 million, and require the sale be completed within a year. The other condition set was that a School Committee member, John Ford, would sit on the RFP committee, the board responsible for preparing the document.

Ultimately, the School Committee opted to table a vote on the transfer of the property until their next meeting, upon a motion made by member Donna Coppola. Coppola said she wanted to take time to allow the committee’s attorney time to research the matter. Voting against the motion to table were Kennedy and Patricia Capano, vice-chair.

Cyr said the initial plan was to demolish the former Marshall Middle School, but a contractor reached out to city officials and wanted to buy it. His vision for the building wasn’t the vision the city had, but it let officials know there was interest in the property, Cyr said.

Lamanna said the cost to demolish the building is estimated at $2.2 million, which was part of the money bonded by the voters for the construction of the new Marshall Middle School, which opened last year on Brookline Street. If that money is not used for demolition, he said legally it could only be used for capital projects that could be bonded for 25 years, which would likely be for the construction of new buildings or additions on the school side. If the property is sold, he said the proceeds would go toward bondable projects more than five years. The proceeds would basically go into a reserve fund that would allow the city to plan ahead if, for example, a boiler in a building went.

Ford said he knows the issue is to sell the building and get some cash for the city in a cash drop situation, but he was hesitant about selling any more school property. He said there was some uncertainty about whether there would be any potential buyers, and he couldn’t see anybody paying big money for some place that’s going to cost lots of money to remediate.

Peabody lays off on initial job-cut fears

“We’re in a city where we’re land strapped,” Ford said. “We’re land poor. I don’t want to eliminate jobs on the city side. I don’t want to hurt anybody, but I really find myself in a position where it’s going to be hard for me to vote to give up any land.”

Kennedy was in favor of the transfer. For 25 years being in public life, she said she also disagreed with selling public land and felt that in most cases, it was better to bank that land.

“The reason why I’m capitulating on this particular piece of land, is that first of all it’s not big enough to build a new modern middle school, so that idea is right out,” Kennedy said. “So, it would only be usable for an elementary school or something of that size. It’s not appropriate for a police or a fire station or anything because it’s basically, it’s on a residential street.”

She said she was more comfortable letting go of this piece of land, because it wouldn’t even be appropriate for a new Cobbet or Tracy Elementary School, because it would be out of that general area of the city.

“And in light of the difficulties that we’re having making the budget come together in this year, it seems like a piece of land that may not be as valuable to the city as someplace that was located deeper into West Lynn,” Kennedy said.

Cyr said an RFP would potentially be to solicit bids for a mixed use, which would include senior market-rate apartments, as well as some commercial use, such as doctors’ offices that would cater to seniors. A small portion of those units, because of federal funding, could be allocated as affordable, he added. He said there is a true need for senior housing at marketable rate in Lynn.

Lamanna said the building was last assessed at $8 million. He said the Massachusetts School Building Authority funded the new Marshall Middle School because the assessment was that the old school on Porter Street was beyond repair. Cyr said it would cost upwards of $50 million to bring the former school up to today’s standards, for it to be restructured for a school use.

Cyr said he was a lot more hopeful after Thursday’s meeting that the transfer would be approved by the School Committee.


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley.

First-graders salute Memorial Day heroes

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
First-grade students from the Aborn Elementary School perform at the Bethany Congregational Church.

By MATT DEMIRS

LYNN — First graders at Aborn Elementary School put on a patriotic show in honor of Memorial Day at the Bethany Congregational Church on Thursday.

Donna Amico and JoAnn Sweeney’s Grade 1 classes dressed in their red, white, and blue and performed the 20th annual show in front of parents and faculty.

Teachers and parents cried tears of joy as they watched the children sing “God Bless the USA.”

Amico enjoys producing the show annually with her classes and Sweeney. She hopes they will remember all they learn for the years to come.

“We want the children to understand why we celebrate the different holidays and traditions throughout the year,” said Amico, who has taught at Aborn for 20 years.

Between singing the classics like “Yankee Doodle” and “This Land is Your Land,” students learned about our country, the national landmark, the flag’s history and the national symbols.

Justin Stackpole, a first grader, said he learned a lot of about his country he didn’t know prior to the show.

“I never knew the first Thanksgiving was in Massachusetts until we started practicing the show,” he said.

Warren rides the Blue Line into Lynn

Ava Howard, another first grader, said she learned the meaning of the different symbols by practicing the show.

“I now know about things like the bald eagle and the Statue of Liberty which are both some of our country’s symbols for freedom,” Howard said.

Students said not only how fun the show was and how much they learned, but how helpful their teachers were in putting the patriotic show together.

Nicolas Morgan credited his teachers for their hard work.

“They’re really helpful,” he said. “On a scale of 1-10, they are a 5 million.”

Like many other students, Morgan said he enjoyed having the support from his family in the crowd and knowing they were having fun.

“My favorite part of the show was singing ‘God Bless the U.S.A.,’” he said. “It made all the parents happy and it put a smile on my face.”

For Superintendent Dr. Catherine C. Latham, the show was a breather from the stresses of the job.

“If things get tough, it’s always nice to come down here and watch something like this,” she said.   


Matt Demirs can be reached at mdemirs@itemlive.com

Mall Street fire

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Firefighters respond to 72 Mall St.

BY THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — An electrical fire in a Mall Street apartment building forced tenants into the street Thursday.

Firefighters were called to the three-story brick property at 8:20 a.m. following an explosion in unit 17 on the third floor, which caused heavy smoke damage. The fire was extinguished in less than a half hour. No one was injured.  

Laurence Eures said he loaded the dishwasher and didn’t notice anything unusual.  “And then, it exploded so I don’t know what happened,” he said.  

Lynn District Fire Chief Robert Bourgeois said the fire is under investigation. The damage was limited to the unit.

We have a building inspector on the way to see if we can get the taeny back into the apartment,” he said Thursday morning.

District Fire Chief Stephen Archer praised Lynn police officer Josh Seaman for evacuating tenants from the building prior to the arrival of the fire crew.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

 

Police log: 5-26-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Marvin Deleon, 30, of 31 Addison Ave., was arrested and charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and miscellaneous equipment violation at 6:43 a.m. Thursday.

Tammy Lafountaine, of 145 Lewis St., was arrested on warrant charges of disorderly conduct, assault and battery on a police officer, resisting arrest and disturbing the peace at 11:01 a.m. Thursday.

Eric Maldonado was arrested on warrant charges of larceny from a building, larceny, trespassing, breaking and entering for a misdemeanor and shoplifting by asportation at 10:14 a.m. Thursday.

William Penta, of 4 Pigeon Hill Road, Brookline, was arrested on warrant charges of perjury, witness intimidation and conspiracy at 12:56 p.m. Thursday.

Orby Sieu, 54, of 100 Willow St., was arrested and charged with malicious wanton property defacement and larceny from a person at 8:13 p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 10:57 a.m. Wednesday at 7-Eleven at 9 Austin Square; at 11:28 a.m. Wednesday at 3 City Hall Square; at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Ford and Locust streets; at 3:32 pm. Wednesday on Lynnfield Street; at 5:03 p.m. Wednesday at 173 Oxford St.; at 5:12 p.m. Wednesday at 10 Union St.; at 6 p.m. Wednesday at Lynnway and Pleasant Street; at 7:27 p.m. Wednesday at Henry’s Variety on Boston Street; at 7:57 a.m. Thursday at Essex and Sheridan streets; at 11:23 a.m. Thursday at Essex and Fayette streets.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 1:54 p.m. Wednesday at 2 State St.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 4:53 p.m. Wednesday on Essex Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 11:26 a.m. Wednesday at 25 Magner Road; at 1:19 p.m. Wednesday at 64 Market Square; at 2:52 p.m. Wednesday on Blake Street; at 3:26 p.m. Wednesday at 52 Baker St.; at 3:50 p.m. Wednesday at 81 Collins St.; at 3:54 p.m. Wednesday at 518 Boston St.; at 6:18 p.m. Wednesday at 374 Boston St.; at 6:24 p.m. Wednesday at 23 Central Square; at 8:24 p.m. Wednesday at Little Caesars at 24 Union St.; at 9:23 p.m. Wednesday at 29 Linden St.; at 11:07 p.m. Wednesday on Essex Street; at 12:09 a.m. Thursday at 160 Neptune Blvd.; at 1:21 a.m. Thursday at 24 Sanger Ave.; at 1:35 a.m. Thursday at 52 Kirtland St.; at 11:29 a.m. Thursday at Dunkin’ Donuts at 364 Lynnway.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 2:37 a.m. Thursday on Chatham Street.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 12:07 p.m. Wednesday at 435 Lynnway; at 2:21 p.m. Wednesday at 166 Washington St.; at 3:53 p.m. Wednesday at 498 Essex St.; at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday at 12 Bennett Circle; at 7:52 p.m. Wednesday at Shelter at 100 Willow St.; at 8:39 p.m. Wednesday on Market Square; at 12:30 p.m. Thursday at 100 Willow St.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 6:12 p.m. Wednesday at Smith and Union streets.

Police log: 5-25-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Arrests

David Douglas Mader, 30, of 165 West Shore Drive, was arrested and charged with two counts of failure to stop for police at 11:06 a.m. Wednesday.

Complaints

A report of a motorcycle failure to stop at 11:06 a.m. Wednesday at Ocean Avenue and Flint Street. A sergeant requested that detail officers on Ocean/East Orchard get the plate of the motorcycle that will be passing them shortly. The motorcyclist was unhappy about the sergeant’s detail and gave him the finger as he passed. Two officers tried to stop the motorcycle and he went right by them knowing that they were trying to get him to stop. David Douglas Mader, 30, was arrested for failure to stop for police.

A report of graffiti in the bathroom at 8 p.m. Wednesday on Humphrey Street. The principal of the high school wanted to speak with an officer, but wouldn’t give specific details on the phone.

A report of suspicious activity at 11:29 p.m. Wednesday on Green Street. A caller reported a suspicious man walking in the area. When the person saw him, he turned and went the other way. Police reported the local resident was throwing trash away in the dumpster.

A report of people with flashlights at 3:02 a.m. Thursday on Harvard Street. A caller reported there is a large group of kids making noise in the street. The caller stated she yelled at two people who were around her house with flashlights. She yelled at them and they left.

A caller reported her young daughter witnessed a person in their driveway taking pictures of their house at 7:29 a.m. Thursday on Pond Street. She stated this has happened several times in the past.


PEABODY

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 6:13 p.m. Wednesday at 193 Winona St. and 2 Pinecrest Ave. A car into a rock was reported; at 6:17 p.m. Wednesday at Lucky House at 22 Central St.; at 7:58 p.m. Wednesday at 0 Margin St. and 2 North Shore Ave.; at 8:46 p.m. Wednesday at 192 Main St. and 2 Howley St.; at 8:12 a.m. Thursday at 378 Lynnfield St. and 0 Bartholomew St. Two people were taken to Salem Hospital; at 11:37 a.m. Thursday at 569 Lowell St.; at 12:55 p.m. Thursday at 13 Centennial Drive.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 7:04 p.m. Wednesday at Peabody Veterans Memorial High School at 485 Lowell St. An out of control parent needed to be removed; at 5:41 a.m. Thursday at Walgreens at 229 Andover St.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 5:32 p.m. Wednesday at 2 Munroe St. A female was taken to Salem Hospital; at 6:06 p.m. Wednesday at 4 Nichols Lane. The person was taken to Union Hospital.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 1:26 p.m. Wednesday at Canterbury Court at 201 Brooksby Village Drive. Several items were reported missing from the apartment.


REVERE

Arrests

Carmen A. Colella, 30, of 8 Payson St., was arrested and charged with assault and battery at 4:49 p.m. Wednesday.

Anthony S. Esposito, 76, of 45 Dolphin Ave., Apt. 310, was arrested and charged with criminal harassment, violation of a harassment prevention order and threat to commit a crime at 7:57 a.m. Wednesday.

Samantha A. Ney, 25, of 31 Elmwood St., Apt. 2, was arrested and charged with two counts of assault and battery on a police officer, resisting arrest, disorderly person and on warrants at 6:56 p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 11:59 a.m. Wednesday at Torretta’s Bakery on Winthrop Avenue; at 2:26 p.m. Wednesday at Tuttle and Revere streets. Judith A. Cerundolo, 54, of 101 Pearl Ave., Apt. 2, was summoned for operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended or revoked license; at 8:43 p.m. Wednesday on Constitution Avenue.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 1:11 p.m. Wednesday at Ocean Avenue and Beach Street; at 2:34 p.m. Wednesday at Carlson Avenue and Malden Street; at 5:20 p.m. Wednesday on Elmwood Street; at 6:56 p.m. Wednesday on Elmwood Street; at 10:09 p.m. Wednesday on Crest Avenue.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 4:28 p.m. Wednesday on Winthrop Avenue.


SAUGUS

Arrests

Nuvia Colindres-Garcia, of Chelsea, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 6:33 p.m. Wednesday.

Frank Gilbert, of 190 Warwick Road, Melrose, was arrested and charged with OUI liquor second offense at 1:34 a.m. Thursday.

Gabriela Segovea, of Chelsea, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 6:33 p.m. Wednesday.

Complaints

A report of identity fraud at 7 p.m. Wednesday at UPS Store at 1268C Broadway. A man reported that someone had stolen his Bank of America credit card number and ordered a $3,500 computer from Microsoft. Someone with a photo ID bearing his information picked it up before him at the UPS store. He has since canceled his credit card.

A report of a disturbance at 11:35 p.m. Wednesday at 16 Denver St. A caller reported her downstairs neighbor kept removing her belongings from the hallway out onto the street.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 10:33 a.m. Wednesday at Charlie’s Pizzeria at 1 Main St. A caller reported two bicycles were stolen behind the building and had the theft on video; at 2:48 p.m. Wednesday at Dick’s Sporting Goods at 1201 Broadway. Loss Prevention reported a theft by an employee.

Judith M. Alley, 73

LYNNJudith M. Alley, 73, a lifelong resident of Lynn, died on Wednesday, May 24 at Lifecare of Lynn. Born in Lynn, she was the daughter of the late Roger W. and Elizabeth (Murray) Richardson Alley, and was a graduate of Lynn English High School, Class of 1961.

Judith worked for Arthur Murray’s Dance Studio for many years in New York and in North Carolina. She formerly worked for the City of Lynn for the C.E.T.A. Program, and the custodial services in the Lynn School Department where she was a member of Union Local #1736. She also worked as a waitress at the former Hotel Edison. She was a member of the former St. Paul’s Methodist Church, Lynn.

Judith was an avid bingo player for many years at St. Mary’s Church and at venues around the New England area. She was a supporter of the Friends of Animals, the Humane Society of the U.S., the M.S.P.C.A. of Boston, World Wildlife Fund, and the Defenders of World Life.

Judith was the dear sister of David Alley of Lynn and the late Roger J. Alley, a school teacher for the City of Lynn for many years and is survived by his wife, her sister-in-law, Pat Alley, also a teacher in the Lynn school system. Judith was also the cherished aunt of Roger J. Alley and his wife, Sharon of Lynn, Cathy Alley-McCarthy and her husband, John of Middleton, Maureen Alley of Lancaster, Calif., Christopher Alley and his wife, Melanie of Beverly, and many grand nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her dog, Scooter and more recently by her cat, Mookie Alley.

Service information: Visiting hours will be held on Wednesday, May 31, 2017 from 9-11 a.m. at the CUFFE-McGINN Funeral Home, 157 Maple Street, Lynn, followed by an 11 a.m. funeral service in the Funeral Home. Burial will follow in Pine Grove Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Judith’s name to the Northeast Animal Shelter, 347 Highland Ave., Salem, MA 01970 or via www.northeastanimalshelter.org. For the online guestbook please visit Cuffemcginn.com.

 

Lorenzo K. Dabney, 64

LYNNLorenzo Kent “Lonnie” Dabney, 64, of Lynn, died on Monday May 22, 2017, at his home after a lengthy illness.

Born in Arlington, Va., he was the son of Lorenzo and Dorothy (Martin) Dabney. He was raised in Virginia and Boston. Lonnie attended Boston English High School and was a graduate of Milton High School. He has lived in Lynn for the past 31 years.

He had worked as a linesman for Verizon for 40 years until his retirement in 2009. After his retirement he had worked for CJ Transportation.

Lonnie loved to travel, especially to Las Vegas and Atlantic City. He was a “Sparkie” he enjoyed listening to his scanner, and he liked to read and keep up on current events. He also enjoyed science fiction and transportation; a holder of a CDL license he loved driving and listening to the sound of the trucks engine. Lonnie was an avid keno player.

He is survived by his fiancé Patricia Barton, of Lynn, his sisters; Jaclyn Easterling, of Boston, and his twin Lana Jackson, of Boston, a brother David Dabney, of Creemor, N.C., his “other family” the Barton Family; Buzzy, Barbara, Roberta, Donna, Paulette, and Carol, and many nieces and nephews. He was also the brother of the late William and Denise Dabney.

Service information: A funeral service will be held on Saturday at 12 p.m.in the SOLIMINE Funeral Home 426 Broadway (Rte129), Lynn. Burial will be private. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend. Visitation on Saturday from 10-12 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the American Cancer Society 30 Speen Street Framingham, MA 01701. Directions and guestbook at Solimine.com.

 

Baker: I like Tom — but I’m with Judy

By THOMAS GRILLO

SALEM — Popular Gov. Charlie Baker could make the difference in re-electing Republican Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy in what could be a close race in November.

“I have known the mayor for quite a while and I will certainly support her re-election,” the Republican governor told The Item on Wednesday. “That said, I have a good working relationship with Sen. McGee … they are two fine people and that’s good for the city of Lynn.”

Last week, state Sen. Thomas McGee (D-Lynn) kicked off his bid for mayor at the Knights of Columbus. The senator told the crowd he was running because he loves the city and the values Lynn represents. Kennedy launched her bid for a third term last month and pointed to dozens of accomplishments.

The race comes amid financial troubles for the cash-strapped city. The 2017 and 2018 budgets continue to pose challenges for Kennedy’s administration. She has asked department heads to make cuts. Some managers may have to trim up to 8.5 percent in their personnel budgets, a request that could lead to layoffs.

I am the best person for the job, McGee says

Kennedy and McGee were behind the failed measure in March to build a pair of middle schools. Voters overwhelmingly rejected increasing their real estate taxes by $200 or more annually for the next 25 years to pay for them.

But they are on opposing sides of an added meals tax that would go into the city’s general fund. McGee supports the idea of adding .0075 to the state’s 6.5 percent meals tax, while Kennedy vetoed the plan last week.

Baker is the most popular governor in America, according to a poll by Morning Consult, a Washington, D.C. research firm. The survey ranked him No. 1 with a 75 percent approval rating. The governor’s disapproval rating is a modest 17 percent, the survey said.

When asked how he would help Kennedy win, Baker declined to be specific.

Consider the progress we’ve made, Kennedy says

“I have a day job, which is pretty busy and chews up lot of my time,” he said. “But if Mayor Kennedy would like me to support and help her, we will do what we can. As I said, I have a lot of respect for Sen.  McGee and those two folks bring a lot to the table for the city.”

While Baker and McGee are native sons of the North Shore, the governor acknowledged he and the senator do not have the same close relationship shared with Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh.   

“Mayor Walsh and I talked every day for more than a month during those snowstorms shortly after I took office,” he said. “That cemented the relationship, it’s just different.”


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

 

Warren candidacy could connect in a blue state

ITEM FILE PHOTO
Newton Mayor Setti Warren speaks with the Item in this February 2017 file photo.

Newton Mayor Setti Warren is running for governor and political handicappers are unlikely to pick him as an odds-on favorite to beat Gov. Charlie Baker in 2018. But Warren, a Democrat, has a track record and a perspective on government that makes him an interesting candidate.

An Iraq War veteran who worked for the federal government and has served as Newton’s mayor for two terms, Warren is blunt about how well state government serves Massachusetts residents: “There is a case to be made we can do better.”

He will make that case during the gubernatorial campaign he officially launched on May 20. For now, Warren is talking frankly and not worrying about being branded a pro-tax candidate or another free-spending Democrat.

He supports a “millionaire’s tax” and said his campaign for governor will be matched by the stance he takes in favor of a proposed ballot question advocating the tax.

“We need more revenue,” he said in a February Item editorial board interview, adding: “Now is not the time to nibble around the edges.”

That is bold talk for someone wading into a big-time political arena like the governor’s race. But Warren has the bona fides to back up his statement. He said his record as mayor includes transforming an empty city reserve fund into a $20 million rainy day account.

When he walked into the mayor’s office for the first time in 2010, Warren made finances a priority. He worked with 17 public service unions to align city government health care costs and instituted management practices.

Comparing Massachusetts’ state government to Newton’s municipal government is like comparing Jupiter to Pluto. But Warren is kicking off his campaign for the state’s top office by sticking to a big-picture view of Massachusetts’ needs.

Warren sets sights on governor’s job

“We’re not making the investments that matter,” he told Item editors. He pointed to transportation infrastructure to make his point.

“We have a complete, utter failure in transportation,” he said.

The primary example he uses to illustrate this statement is the decades-long push by Lynn business and political leaders to extend Blue Line rapid transit to Lynn. Long looked upon as an economic development spark for Lynn, the Blue Line extension, in Warren’s, view is a way to make the North Shore’s gateway city a regional transportation hub.

The implications of that perspective are significant. Mass-transit alternatives are taking on heightened importance at a time when aging roadways are becoming more congested and clogged with traffic. Providing a Boston-Lynn transit link sets the stage for forging an economic bond between the cities.

Warren sees the logic behind the Blue Line extension and other long-term projects aimed at enhancing Massachusetts’ economy. The difference between Warren and a lot of people running for office or serving in public office is he is not afraid to talk about spending tax dollars in order to make a difference in Massachusetts.

He thinks a millionaire’s tax could generate an estimated $2 billion annually. Plenty of critics will line up to criticize the tax. But how many will offer constructive solutions aimed at fixing Massachusetts’ roads and bridges and modernizing aging housing?

“This is about economic stimulation,” he said, “and the courage and honesty to raise revenue.”

That’s a tough position to argue against and Warren is sure to state his case all the way to the ballot box next year.

Police log: 5-25-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Shara Belgiorno was arrested on warrant charges of two counts of Class B drug possession at 12:37 p.m. Tuesday.

Patrick Kayulu was arrested on warrant charges of assault with a dangerous weapon, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, armed assault to rob and trespassing at 4:23 p.m. Tuesday.

Steven Paradis, of 19 Hanover St., was arrested on warrant charges of Class A drug possession, Class B drug possession, Class C drug possession, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, failure to wear a seatbelt and conspiracy to violate the drug law at 6:05 p.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 12:18 p.m. Tuesday  at 269 Union St.; at 1:34 p.m. Tuesday at 237 Chatham St.; at 7:12 p.m. Tuesday on Lynnway; at 11:16 p.m. Tuesday at Chestnut and Pond streets; at 11:26 p.m. Tuesday at Chestnut and Grant streets; at 12:47 a.m. Wednesday at 120 Franklin St.; at 9:18 a.m. Wednesday at 101 Western Ave.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 5:12 p.m. Tuesday at Blue Ox at 191 Oxford St.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 5:24 p.m. Tuesday on Western Avenue; at 10:32 p.m. Tuesday on Washington Street.

A report of an assault and battery at 9:47 p.m. Tuesday on Johnson Street.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 2:32 p.m. Tuesday at 679 Western Ave.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 11:29 a.m. Tuesday at 221 Cedar Brook Road; at 12:03 p.m. Tuesday on Brightwood Terrace; at 12:28 p.m. Tuesday at Shelter at 110 Willow St.; at 2:18 p.m. Tuesday on State Street; at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday at 200 Essex St.; at 4:21 p.m. Tuesday on Sagamore Street; at 4:52 p.m. Tuesday at 27 Union St.; at 6:24 p.m. Tuesday at 819 Western Ave.; at 6:57 p.m. Tuesday at 40 Newhall St.; at 12 a.m. Wednesday on Blaisdell Terrace; at 12:35 a.m. Wednesday at 27 Wolcott Road; at 2:20 a.m. Wednesday on Lewis Street: at 2:35 a.m. Wednesday at 501 Washington St.; at 5:53 a.m. Wednesday at 11 Shepard St.; at 6:44 a.m. Wednesday at 48 Laighton St.; at 10:07 a.m. Wednesday at 66 Harwood St.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 7:07 p.m. Tuesday on Franklin Street.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 2:17 p.m. Tuesday at 250 Maple St.; at 7:15 a.m. Wednesday at 11 Violet St.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 9:47 a.m. Wednesday at 160 Neptune Blvd.

Police log: 5-24-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 11:43 a.m. Tuesday at Pleasant and Smith streets; at 6:28 p.m. Tuesday at Ocean and Harbor avenues. A caller reported the earlier that day, he witnessed a vehicle “go so fast and hit a granite curb and bounce the car back into the road.” He stated that he spoke to the driver and asked him to slow down next time. He said there appeared to be a small portion of the wall missing from the accident. Police reported there was no significant damage in the area.

A report of a vehicle into a wall at 6:05 p.m. Tuesday on Elm Street. A caller reported she witnessed a vehicle get hit and “jump the curb and hit something.” She stated the driver appeared to have a cut lip. A caller reported he heard an accident and walked to the bottom of the hill and saw a single vehicle into a wall. The caller went to assist the person who stated he was struck by a black car and he took off in an unknown direction. Police reported there was no other vehicle involved and it was not a hit and run accident. Two people were taken to Salem Hospital. The driver was cited for negligent operation.

Overdose

A report of a possible overdose at 10:33 p.m. Tuesday on Atlantic Avenue. A caller reported his 28-year-old son was unconscious, but breathing and thought it was an overdose. The person was taken to Salem Hospital.


PEABODY

Arrests

Danielle N. Fiandaca, 19, of 13 Walden Hill Drive, was arrested and charged with OUI liquor at 5:15 a.m. Wednesday.

Gavin Guay, 25, of 2 Celtic St., Concord, New Hampshire, was arrested and charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and on warrants at 11:45 a.m. Wednesday.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 9:03 p.m. Tuesday on Hardy Street. A caller reported that a group of youths playing basketball somewhere on the street were keeping her up. Police reported the youths were advised to shut it down for the night; at 12:04 a.m. Wednesday at 54 Lynn St.

A caller reported seeing two bears by a neighbor’s yellow house at 1:45 p.m. Wednesday at 21 Ethel Ave. Police reported checking the area, and didn’t see any bears or signs of them.

A report of gunshots at 2:50 p.m. Wednesday at Leather City Commons at 77 Lowell St. An officer reported hearing fireworks or a possible gunshot in the area. Police reported checking the area and were unable to find anything out of the ordinary.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 7:06 p.m. Tuesday at 19 Bradford Road. A caller reported a few items missing from the home.


REVERE

Arrests

Lonnie E. Jones, 51, of 10 Mason St., Nashua, New Hampshire, was arrested on a warrant at 11:24 p.m. Tuesday.

Jared W. Spera, 20, of 3A Lisbon St., Malden, was arrested and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, operating an unregistered motor vehicle/trailer and operating an uninsured motor vehicle at 11:13 a.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 1:11 a.m. Tuesday on School Street; at 8:15 a.m. Tuesday on Broadway. Frank O. Coppola, 62, of 40 Union St., Apt. 2, was summoned for operating after a suspended license or right to operate; at 12:11 p.m. Tuesday at Sunoco Gas Station on Lee Burbank Highway.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 7:20 a.m. Tuesday at Beach Street and Cary Avenue; at 8:28 p.m. Tuesday on Endicott Avenue.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident with personal injury at 3:40 p.m. Tuesday on Beach Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 9:38 a.m. Tuesday on North Shore Road; at 10:10 a.m. Tuesday on Nahant Avenue; at 11:13 a.m. Tuesday at Greater Boston Indoor Sports on Charger Street; at 7:06 p.m. Tuesday at Caruso’s Northgate Apartments on Lantern Road; at 8:57 p.m. Tuesday at CVS on Squire Road; at 9:33 p.m. Tuesday at Sunoco on North Shore Road; at 10:16 p.m. Tuesday on Fenley Street.

Overdose

A report of a possible overdose at 7:35 p.m. Tuesday on Raymond Road.

Theft

A report of a larceny/forgery/fraud at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday on Kimball Avenue; at 9:04 p.m. Tuesday at Target on Furlong Drive.


SAUGUS

Arrests

Jamie L. Stiefel, of 1268 Broadway, Apt. C302, was arrested and charged with larceny by a single scheme at 10:45 a.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 5:09 p.m. Tuesday at KFC at 421 Broadway.

Complaints

A caller reported a raccoon trapped in the tree at 9:43 a.m. Tuesday at 10 Alder St. The animal control officer reported the homeowner’s dogs were safely back inside the home and the raccoon left the yard.

A report of a suspicious motor vehicle at 5:13 p.m. Tuesday at Buffalo Wild Wings at 180 Main St. A caller reported a vehicle clipped a tree and kept driving towards the restaurant. Police reported the driver was avoiding a squirrel and hit a small tree in the process

A report of suspicious activity at 6 p.m. Tuesday at 8 Pamela Road. A caller reported multiple computers in her family’s house were hacked and the hacker was demanding ransom. Police reported there was no crime and the computer had a virus.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 12:11 p.m. Tuesday at Marine Corps Recruiting Office at 188 Broadway. The staff sergeant reported the rear passenger door to one of their government vehicles was dented.


SWAMPSCOTT

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 8:40 p.m. Monday at Walgreens at 505 Paradise Road; at 5:45 p.m. Tuesday at Burrill and Essex streets.

Assaults

A report of an assault and battery at 5:25 p.m. Tuesday on Pine Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 1:35 a.m. Monday at 26 Shackle Way.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 8:57 a.m. Tuesday at 61 Lincoln Circle; at 6:04 p.m. Tuesday at Hadley School at 24 Redington St.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 2:30 p.m. Monday at 40 Stetson Ave.

A report of vandalism at 9:20 a.m. Tuesday at Gulf Express at 197 Essex St.

Lynn woman asks ‘When is enough enough?’

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Lorraine Varjabedian still hasn’t been paid her judgment.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Nearly six years after a sewer backup damaged Lorraine Varjabedian‘s ranch style home on Maplewood Road, she is still waiting to be reimbursed for the renovation.

“Not only was my house the only one in Lynn to be filled with waste, it’s been five and a half years,” she said. “When is enough enough?”

Last month, a Essex Superior Court Judge Elizabeth Fahey ordered the city’s Water & Sewer Commission and Procopio Enterprises Inc., a Saugus construction company, to pay Varjabedian a total of $52,653. Both parties have appealed the decision.

The drama started in 2011 when an early morning storm dumped more than four inches of rain in less than 24 hours. It caused the homeowner to awake to the sound of running water in her three-bedroom home.

Sewage rose about 10 inches to the top of the bottom step. A family room, laundry center and a bathroom, as well as walls and doors were destroyed.

The city offered to pay the cleaning bill of nearly $13,000. But Varjabedian insisted the cost of the cleanup, new appliances and renovation was much more and she refused to settle.

The next year, Varjabedian filed suit. Following an investigation, the city discovered the bathroom had been built without permits. In addition, engineers learned stormwater was entering sewer lines in the Boulder Heights neighborhood in contrast to instructions given when the building permits were issued to Procopio, the builder.

Up in arms over Peabody pot district

The judge found that the commission and the builder were at fault.

Peter Bosse, Procopio’s attorney, declined to comment.  

“We bought this house when we were 20,” Varjabedian said.  

In her ruling, Judge Fahey found the homeowner’s installation of a bathroom below grade contributed to the incident and reduced the award to half the original claim.

“I sued for $80,000 when, in fact, my loss was more than $120,000 with about $60,000 of that going to lawyers,” Varjabedian said. “Everything went into a dumpster including my wedding gown and many family photographs.”

Samuel Vitali, the attorney for the Water & Sewer Commission, said while the panel is sympathetic, it was their fault.

“We offered to pay for the cleanup, but no good deed goes unpunished and she rejected our offer,” he said. “I have an obligation to protect my client, and they are the 90,000 ratepayers.”

Varjabedian just wants it to be over.

“I’ve lived in this house for 52 years and I’m 73,” she said. “I will be dead by the time this is resolved. Why couldn’t they just pay it?”


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

 

Lynn doubles down on excise-tax delinquents

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Taxpayers will pay more if they fail to meet their obligations on time.

Peter Caron, the city’s chief financial officer, proposed, and the council approved boosting the late fee to $30, up from $15 for late payers of excise and real estate tax bills.  

“The call has been out to department heads to review their fees as a way increase revenue,” he said. “That was one of the marching orders from the mayor.”  

Of the 55,000 excise bills last year, the city raised $480,000 in late fees from about 32,000 tardy payers. If the same number of residents fails to make timely payments, it would raise $960,000 in fiscal year 2018.

No re-election plans for Trahant

The Ways & Means Committee voted to approve the measure without debate and the City Council followed.

While Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy supported the fee hike, she vetoed the local option meals tax that would impose a .0075 percent tax on top of the state’s 6.25 percent sales tax on meals.

The new levy would add 75 cents to a $100 dinner bill, about 19 cents to a $25 meal and raise $700,000 annually for the city. The City Council is expected override the mayor’s veto at a special meeting next Tuesday.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

 

No re-election plans for Trahant

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — In a stunning announcement at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting, Ward 2 City Councilor William Trahant said he would not seek re-election.

Citing health reasons, including a recent heart attack, the nine-term councilor said his heart has been out of rhythm and he needs rest.    

“I’ve done a lot of soul searching and spent many hours talking to family, friends, colleagues, my cardiologist, my surgeon and everybody else,” he said. “They don’t think it’s the right time to run a campaign. I run a full-time roofing business in the city and that has to come first. But I will get better and will still be here if you need me.”

Trahant said he is most proud of construction of a new police station and middle school and the election of Darren Cyr as council president.

Swampscott voters to decide rail-trail fate

He thanked fellow councilors, the law department and the City Clerk’s office for their hard work.

“Everyone at City Hall has been like family,” he said choking back tears.

Cyr praised Trahant and noted that saying goodbye will be the hardest thing to do.

“Billy can be counted on and puts more time in than anyone in helping this community,” he said.    

Councilor-at-Large Daniel Cahill, who will also be leaving the council at the end of this term, said Trahant will deservedly take his place among the greatest city councilors who ever services this city.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

 

Ehrlich: Tax credit will earn income for state

By BRIDGET TURCOTTE

BOSTON — State Rep. Lori Ehrlich (D-Marblehead) believes a budget recommendation she co-sponsored for Fiscal Year 2018 will benefit working families and domestic abuse survivors.

The bill draws on legislation filed by Ehrlich and Rep. Marjorie Decker (D-Cambridge), making nonresidents of the state ineligible to claim the Earned Income Tax Credit.

According to the Department of Revenue, there are more than 20,000 nonresidents who earn income tax in the state and claim the state EITC each year. With the former federal match rate of 15 percent, these claims have been estimated to cost more than $6.5 million in revenue each fiscal year. At the new match rate of 23 percent, the cost would be about $10 million in revenue each year, according to House Ways and Means estimates.

“This credit is a scarce state resource available to assist struggling working families, so it makes little sense that we are allowing people who do not live in Massachusetts to claim the credit,” Ehrlich said in a statement.

The changes also clarify eligibility for taxpayers who live in Massachusetts for part of the year and expands access to the survivors of domestic abuse by allowing them to claim the credit while filing their taxes as “married, filing separately.” In the past, an individual could not claim the EITC unless taxes were filed jointly with a spouse.

Wheelabrator Saugus being taken to court

By supporting the changes, Ehrlich said the state takes the lead by enabling victims of domestic violence, who courageously flee their batterers.

The proposed budget also included a $150,000 allocation for Self Esteem Boston, a nonprofit that supports Lynn-based Project Cope, an organization that helps women in transition through homelessness or recovery from substance abuse.

The amendment was previously filed by former Rep. Gloria Fox but filed by Ehrlich in this session.

Self Esteem Boston provides essential psychological counseling and training for women in recovery from substance abuse problems.

During budget deliberations last month, the House of Representatives approved an amendment made by Ehrlich to dedicate $50,000 of the $40 million budget to clean up the odorous Pilayella algae on King’s Beach and Long Beach in Lynn.

Ehrlich called the funding crucial for combating the algae and its odor, which is a quality of life issue.


Bridget Turcotte can be reached at bturcotte@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @BridgetTurcotte

Congratulate a graduate in print

Congratulate a student or an entire class on the day their photos appear in The Daily Item and/or La Voz.

Take a look at the schools we will be covering this year:

  • Bishop Fenwick*
  • Lynn Classical
  • Lynn English
  • Lynn Tech
  • Lynnfield High*
  • Marblehead High*
  • Malden High*
  • Malden Catholic*
  • Medford High*
  • Peabody High
  • Revere High
  • Saugus High*
  • St. John’s Prep*
  • St. Mary’s
  • Swampscott High*

* Daily Item only

We will provide expansive coverage of this year’s local high school graduations beginning on June 5 and concluding on June 17 within The Daily Item.

La Voz will feature coverage in its June 15 edition.

Say congratulations through a color business card size ad (3.38″w x 2″h) for $50.00 ($25.00 for greyscale).

Call us at 781-593-7700 and simply say, “I’d like to place a graduation ad.” Our customer service team will be happy to assist you.

Larger ads are available. For additional information call 781-593-7700 and ask for the sales department.

All photos published in the Daily Item can be purchased online by visiting Itemlive.com. Talk to our customer service team for instructions.

Our motto is cheap, cheap, cheap

For 10 years, Bennett Street Tire and Glass has been known as the “Best of the Best” in the greater Lynn, MA area. It’s no wonder, as owner Gary Janice and his staff have made every effort to provide prompt, courteous and professional service since the shop opened in 1979. At Bennett Street Tire and Glass, we specialize in original equipment, high performance and light truck tires. From our location at 60 Bennett St., Lynn, MA, we serve the surrounding communities of Revere, Swampscott, Salem, Saugus, Marblehead and Lynnfield.

At Bennett Street Tire and Glass, our motto may be, “Cheap, Cheap, Cheap,” but all you will find is quality when you purchase tires through us. We stock only the best Lynn MA tires, from nationally recognized brands including: MICHELIN®, BFGoodrich® and Uniroyal®. Our friendly staff will gladly help you select a set of replacement tires or find your tires from home by going to our website’s Tire Size Finder. This feature allows you to search for tires using the make, model and year of the vehicle. We provide comprehensive tire services including regular and low profile installation, computer spin balance, flat repairs, PAX tire sales and service, road force balancing and rotations.

Because we are a full-service Lynn Massachusetts auto repair center, our technicians are highly qualified to perform mechanical repairs such as wheel alignment, electrical work, starting and charging of batteries and TPMS. Don’t forget, we also provide the best auto glass repair and replacement in the Lynn area using Pittsburgh Glassworks products.

WE CARRY THE FOLLOWING TIRE BRANDS:

  • Michelin
  • BFGoodrich
  • Uniroyal
  • Bridgestone
  • Continental
  • Dunlop
  • Firestone
  • General
  • Goodyear
  • Hankook
  • and others

Stop in anytime during shop hours, 8 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday, or Saturday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., or contact us online. We are always ready and willing to answer all questions concerning estimates or the repair process. As a member of the Lynn Chamber of Commerce, we’re committed to providing prompt, courteous and professional service. Our philosophy is to make every possible effort to eliminate problems before, during and after repairs when a sale is made. That’s one of the reasons why Bennett Tire and Glass has been voted the Greater Lynn area’s best place to buy tires for three consecutive years.

Email: bstg01905@gmail.com
Phone: 781-598-1613
Fax: 781-595-9810
Address: 60 Bennett St., Lynn, MA 01905
Web site: bennettstreettireglass.com

 

Police log: 5-24-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Tharith Mom, 47, was arrested and charged with Class A drug possession, Class B drug possession and on a warrant charge of nighttime breaking and entering for a felony at 10:32 a.m. Tuesday.

Nehemias Pojoy-Deleon, 27, of 214 Essex St., Apt. 2, was arrested and charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, marked lanes violation and on warrants at 10:50 p.m. Monday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 5:20 p.m. Monday at Essex and Bessom streets; at 7:47 a.m. Tuesday at 32 Boston St.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 8:31 p.m. Monday at 3 Broad St.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 10:32 p.m. Monday at Eastern Avenue and Essex Street.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 6:52 p.m. Monday at 84 Franklin St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 2 p.m. Monday at 64 Robinson St.; at 12:54 a.m. Tuesday at 500 Essex St.; at 1:03 a.m. Tuesday at 18 Fuller St.; at 4:09 a.m. Tuesday at 119 Lewis St.; at 4:57 a.m. Tuesday at Family Dollar at 50 Central Ave.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 1:22 p.m. Monday at 541 Chestnut St.; at 3:13 p.m. Monday at Eblens at 14 State St.; at 5:18 p.m. Monday at Convenience Store at 127 Munroe St.; at 1:06 a.m. Tuesday at 12 Iona Terrace

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 12:39 p.m. Monday at 36 Safford St.

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 2:41 p.m. Monday at 44 Curwin Circle; at 7:07 a.m. Tuesday at 69 Camden St.

Police log: 5-23-2017


LYNNFIELD

Arrests

Kevin Martinez, 27, of 13 Joanne Drive, Apt. 14, Ashland, was arrested and charged with operating on a revoked license and operating a truck on an excluded way at 9:50 a.m. Friday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 3:15 a.m. Saturday at 128 South Ramp on North Broadway; at 4:08 p.m. Saturday at 228 Lowell St. and 1100 Main St.; at 4:05 p.m. Sunday at Main Street and Route 128 Exit 41; at 2:51 p.m. Monday on Canterbury Road.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 3:24 a.m. Saturday at 6 Gianna Drive and 767 Walnut St.; at 5:57 a.m. Saturday at 376 Lowell St.; at 8:05 p.m. Saturday at 8 Needham Road; at 2:47 p.m. Sunday on Juniper Road.

A report of suspicious activity at 6:55 a.m. Monday at 4 Lake St. A caller reported a black backpack was left in front of her house. Police went through the bag and found that it was a kid’s bag with Gatorade in it.

Fire

A report of a mulch fire at 2:32 p.m. Saturday at Christmas Tree Shop at 28 South Broadway.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 9:30 a.m. Friday at 605 Chestnut St.

Vandalism

A report of malicious destruction of property at 3:49 p.m. Friday at Lynnfield High School at 275 Essex St.


MARBLEHEAD

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 8:03 p.m. Monday on Atlantic Avenue.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 6:56 p.m. Monday on Maple Street. A woman reported her son had bruises and cuts on his arm. When she asked him what happened, he told her it was done by a teacher’s aide in school. Once she heard that, she brought him to the police station.

Complaints

A caller returned home and saw a man on the back porch at 5:16 p.m. Monday on Ocean Avenue. Police reported the man was a contractor working there.


PEABODY

Arrests

Richard Mottola, 29, of 1 Anne Drive, was arrested and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, assault and battery and witness intimidation at 2:06 a.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 7:12 p.m. Monday at Northshore Mall at 210N Andover St.; at 3:01 p.m. Tuesday at Pediatric Health Care at 10 Centennial Drive.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 7:25 a.m. Tuesday at 6 Reo Road.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 9:30 p.m. Monday at 34 Sherman St.; at 10:53 p.m. Monday at 24 Fulton St. and 1 Dennis St.; at 2:06 a.m. Tuesday at 1 Anne Drive. A domestic, involving a man with a knife was reported. Richard Mottola, 29, was arrested; at 4:14 p.m. Tuesday at James Street Park on James Street.

A report of suspicious activity at 11:20 a.m. Tuesday at Town Variety at 116 Central St. Three men made the caller nervous.

Theft

A report of fraud at 5:49 p.m. Tuesday at Northfield Properties at 2 Main St. A man reported that a $306.06 check was stolen out of his mailbox sometime over the last two weeks and was cashed.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 7 p.m. Monday at 40 Tremont St. A caller reported her vehicle was vandalized. An officer reported there was a screw in the vehicle’s tire; at 10:50 a.m. Tuesday at Family Entertainment Group at 535 Lowell St. A manager reported vandalized windows; at 4:29 p.m. Tuesday at 146 Main St. The landlord reported some damage to the rear common area door. An officer spoke with the caller, who reported the rear door frame was broken.


REVERE

Arrests

Jacqueline Reyes, 30, of 15 Parkside Place, Apt. 214, was arrested and charged with assault and battery and on a warrant at 7:31 p.m. Monday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 8:26 a.m. Monday at Pearle Vision/Northgate Plaza on Squire Road; at 9:16 a.m. Monday on Everett Street; at 10:12 a.m. Monday on Mahoney Circle; at 10:59 a.m. Monday on Beach Street.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 10:09 a.m. Monday on Bell Circle.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 12:59 p.m. Monday at CVS on Squire Road; at 3:27 Monday on Prospect Avenue.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 3:10 a.m. Monday on Crescent Avenue; at 4:43 a.m. Monday on Nahant Avenue; at 7:39 p.m. Monday on Florence Avenue.

Overdose

A report of a possible overdose at 8:55 p.m. Monday on Bateman Avenue.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 10:08 a.m. Monday at State Road Liquors on State Road.


SAUGUS

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 6:25 a.m. Monday at 52 Lincoln Ave.; at 8:12 a.m. Monday at 10 Vinegar Hill Drive.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:26 p.m. Monday at Kohls at 333 Broadway.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 6:56 p.m. Monday at Route 1 South on Broadway. One person was taken to Melrose Wakefield Hospital after a two-car accident.

Complaints

A caller reported a woman spray painted her room and wanted her removed at 10:59 a.m. Monday at Avalon Motel at 1529 Broadway. Police reported it was a disagreement over the money paid and the way the room was kept.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 1:21 p.m. Monday at Holiday Inn Express at 999 Broadway.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 10:59 a.m. Monday at 5 Stanley Terrace. A woman reported several acts of vandalism to her home.

Meetings to focus on beaches, state funding

COURTESY PHOTO
A child enjoys King’s Beach.

By MATT DEMIRS and THOR JOURGENSEN

LYNN — Summer is still a month away but a meeting scheduled for next Tuesday and another for June will focus on area beaches and their state funding.

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission’s (MBC) May 30 hearing at the Lynn Museum, 590 Washington St., starts at 6 p.m. and is scheduled for two hours. A second hearing is scheduled for June 12, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the State House, room 222.

Topics will include water quality improvements throughout local beaches this summer, as well as algae removal. According to an MBC press release, the hearings will also focus on potential budget cuts affecting free events and state Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) beach operations in Lynn and Nahant.

The hearings overlap state Rep. Lori Ehrlich’s push to spend $50,000 to eliminate beach algae — an annual source of odor complaints.

“This funding is crucial to combatting the algae, a long-standing problem for residents and visitors to the beach because of the annual buildup and noxious odor it releases,” Ehrlich said. “The algae is unique to our beaches and just one beach elsewhere in the world, and needs to be dealt with promptly each spring to prevent the smell from worsening through the summer and fall, when it becomes unbearable.”

MBC lead consultant Bruce Berman said legislators are playing lead roles in restoring beaches, especially state Sen. Thomas McGee, who Berman said “has saltwater in his blood.” Created in 2006 by the Massachusetts Legislature, MBC is co-chaired by McGee of Lynn, and Rep. RoseLee Vincent of Revere.

Ehrlich’s push to fight beach algae comes as beach-goers face potential parking fee hikes.

The State House News Service reported that DCR plans to double the fee for parking at Nahant Beach to $10. The Baker administration is hiking the parking fees for non-Massachusetts residents at Nahant and Nantasket Beach south of Boston to $20, the News Service first reported in March.

Gruesome details emerge in double killing

Though he publicly opposes tax and fee increases, Gov. Charlie Baker did not move to reverse DCR fee increases after taking office in 2015.

The News Service reported DCR’s fee hikes were pushed through more than two years ago by the outgoing Patrick administration.

“The previous administration actually raised the rates just before we came in, and so we’ve been rolling out that increase,” DCR Commissioner Leo Roy told the News Service.

He said, “We’re using the rate increase that was previously done by the previous administration, but it hadn’t been rolled out across the state and that’s what we’re doing.”

By July 1, Roy is hoping “we’ll have the whole state on the new rates.”

Roy told the News Service the fee hikes will help his agency increase its retained revenue to an estimated $20 million in fiscal 2018, up $2.3 million over the amount expected in the fiscal 2017 budget. The department is also seeking to make more money from permits issued for use of state parkland, Roy said.

DCR is allowed to keep 80 percent of the revenue it raises, said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Matt Beaton, who told the News Service he expects DCR will raise a total of $25 million — including $5 million for the General Fund — and some estimates indicate the department could bring in a total of $27 million.

Beaches in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy and Hull are among coastal recreation areas Save the Harbor/Save the Bay and MBC seek to protect.

According to its website, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay’s current programs are “designed to restore and protect Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay, and share and reconnect all Bostonians, the region’s residents, and especially underserved youth and teens and low-income families to the harbor, waterfront, beaches and islands we have worked so hard to restore and protect.”

The Lynn and State House hearings will precede publication of a beach water quality study by the Beaches Science Advisory Committee.

Police log: 5-23-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Raymond Bryant, 63, was arrested and charged with trespassing at 9:43 p.m. Sunday.

Renice Dave, 21, of 36 Broad St., Brockton, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 3:15 p.m. Sunday.

Denatia Dunn, 22, of 36 Broad St., Brockton, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 3:18 p.m. Sunday.

Ryan Sartell, 33, of 4 Houghton St., was arrested on warrant charges of Class A drug distribution, Class B drug distribution, failure to signal and marked lane violation at 6:45 p.m. Sunday.

Alejandro Sosa-Delacruz, 49, of 413 Boston St., was arrested and charged with malicious wanton property defacement, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest at 1:09 a.m. Monday.

Kollie Tapeh, 33, of 484 Western Ave., was arrested and charged with operation of a motor vehicle with a revoked license at 11:14 p.m. Monday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 3:32 p.m. Sunday at 50 Western Ave.; at 4:11 p.m. Sunday at Chestnut Street and Western Avenue; at 4:29 p.m. Sunday at 515 Western Ave.; at 4:40 p.m. Sunday on Western Avenue; at 6:31 p.m. Sunday at 17 West Green St.; at 10:11 p.m. Sunday at Eastern and Oakwood avenues; at 10:49 a.m. Monday at 196 Euclid Ave.; at 10:53 a.m. Monday at 269 Union St.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 4:20 p.m. Sunday at 91 Chestnut St.; at 5:26 p.m. Sunday at 11 Lowell St.; at 5:43 p.m. Sunday at 61 Neptune St.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 4:40 p.m. Sunday at 155 Commercial St.; at 7:58 a.m. Monday at Big Lots at 126 Boston St.; at 10:42 a.m. Monday at Boston and Washington streets.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 3:46 p.m. Sunday on Western Avenue; at 3:46 p.m. Sunday on Curwin Terrace.

A report of an assault and battery with a dangerous weapon at 4:47 p.m. Sunday on Washington Street.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 8:41 a.m. Monday at 74 Chatham St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 2:24 p.m. Sunday at Honey Dew Donuts at 1067 Western Ave.; at 2:37 p.m. Sunday at 107 River St.; at 3:14 p.m. Sunday on Hanson Street; at 6:40 p.m. Sunday at 104 Woodman St.; at 7 p.m. Sunday at 133 Chatham St.; at 8:49 p.m. Sunday at 19 Mall St.; at 1:12 a.m. Monday at 33 Cherry St.; at 9:56 a.m. Monday at 53 Clovelly St.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 10:32 p.m. Sunday at 138 Jackson St.; at 7:27 a.m. Monday at 117 North Common St.

Police log: 5-22-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Arrests

Patricia A. Flynn, 51, of 14 Hawkes St., was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct at 4:48 p.m. Sunday.

Raymond J. Viera, 28, of 5 Henry Ave. Apt. 1, Lynn, was arrested and charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle at 10:01 a.m. Monday.

Accidents

A report of a bike vs. car accident at 12:11 p.m. Sunday on Doaks Lane. Multiple callers reported a motorcycle was speeding down Doaks Lane and had struck a car. The person was reportedly in and out of consciousness and bleeding from an unknown area. One person was taken to Salem Hospital.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 3:14 p.m. Sunday on Tedesco Street; at 4:14 p.m. Sunday on West Shore Drive.

Complaints

A caller reported  he was traveling with his family on West Shore Drive when another vehicle was tailgating him and attempting to cross the double lines and pass him at 12:06 p.m. Sunday. The caller and the other vehicle pulled over and the other driver reportedly gave him “the finger” before speeding off on Cornell Road.


PEABODY

Arrests

Zara J. Zegarowski, 37, of 6 School St., Apt. 2, Beverly, was arrested and charged with assault and battery and resisting arrest at 11:58 p.m. Sunday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:51 p.m. Monday at 18 Brown St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 6:05 p.m. Sunday at 32 Nancy Ave. and 26 Edythe Lane; at 8:06 p.m. Sunday at 3 Tremont Place; at 11:05 p.m. Sunday at 56 Central St.; at 11:58 p.m. Sunday at 14 Bourbon St.; at 12:27 a.m. Monday at Tannery Apartments at 50 Warren St.; at 12:41 a.m. Monday on Trofin Lane; at 4:02 a.m. Monday at Mobile Estates at 286 Newbury St.

A report of suspicious activity at 10:21 a.m. Monday at MacArthur Park on MacArthur Circle. A girl with pink hair was reportedly walking barefoot and crying. The girl was taken back to her home, and her mother was at home. She was upset because she had missed the bus; at 12:55 p.m. Monday on Railroad Avenue. A man was reportedly carrying around a baseball bat on his shoulder. Police reported the 64-year-old man had found a bat and wanted to keep it for stickball.

Theft

A woman reported at 4:22 p.m. Monday that her son’s bike was stolen from the South Memorial School at 24 Maple St.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 6:07 p.m. Sunday at Walnut Street Place at 8 Walnut St. A caller reported another tenant damaged some of her property.


REVERE

Arrests

Abdel Rahman Abla, 37, of 92 Proctor Ave., Apt. B, was arrested and charged with assault and battery and strangulation or suffocation at 4:54 a.m. Saturday.

Grace Duran, 24, of 27-29 Lafayette Park, Apt. 1(Left), Lynn, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 6:04 p.m. Saturday.

Anthony J. Faldich, 58, of 47 Nahant Ave., Apt. 3, was arrested and charged with trespassing at 9:29 a.m. Friday.

Lonnie E. Jones, 51, of 10 Mason St., Nashua, New Hampshire, was arrested on a warrant at 2:25 p.m. Saturday.

Angel Matos, 20, of 162 Union St., Apt. 3, Everett, was arrested and charged with assault and battery and threatening to commit a crime at 4:27 a.m. Saturday.

Christina Ashley Modica, 26, of 149 Elm St., Stoneham, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by asportation at 12:25 p.m. Sunday.

Lajanae Russell, 18, of 61 Lincoln St., Apt. B, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by asportation and malicious destruction of property at 10:29 a.m. Sunday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 12:34 p.m. Friday at Mountain Avenue and Broadway; at 2:06 p.m. Friday at Squire and Gore roads; at 2:51 p.m. Friday at Folsom Street and Broadway; at 2:56 p.m. Friday on Revere Beach Parkway; at 7:19 p.m. Friday on Beach Street; at 10:11 p.m. Friday on Butler Circle; at 7:03 a.m. Saturday at Rick’s Auto Collision on North Shore Road; at 12:24 p.m. Saturday on Fenley Street; at 3:24 p.m. Saturday at Nahant Avenue and Beach Street; at 7:29 p.m. Saturday at North Shore Road and Revere Street; at 2:48 a.m. Sunday on Garfield Avenue; at 2:52 a.m. Sunday on Centennial Avenue; at 11:49 a.m. Sunday on Salem Street; at 11:49 a.m. Sunday on Revere Beach Parkway; at 2:08 p.m. Sunday on Mahoney Circle; at 3:04 p.m. Sunday on Mahoney Circle; at 3:28 p.m. Sunday on Lee Burbank Highway; at 4:06 p.m. Sunday at Registry of Motor Vehicles on Everett Street; at 4:30 p.m. Sunday on Copeland Circle; at 7:16 p.m. Sunday at Broadway and Central Avenue; at 11:43 p.m. Sunday on Copeland Circle.

A report of a pedestrian hit by a motor vehicle at 12:44 p.m. Friday on Salem Street.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 9:14 p.m. Saturday on Dolphin Avenue; at 7:49 a.m. Sunday on Lee Burbank Highway.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 10:23 p.m. Sunday on Crescent Avenue.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 12:57 p.m. Friday on Prospect Avenue; at 3:39 p.m. Friday on Hyde Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 10:50 a.m. Friday at Dunkin’ Donuts on Squire Road; at 8:55 p.m. Friday on Neponset Street; at 8:58 p.m. Friday on Vane Street; at 9 p.m. Friday on Walnut Avenue; at 12:28 a.m. Saturday on Dashwood Street; at 12:31 a.m. Saturday on Alice Street; at 1:51 a.m. Saturday at Blaney and Lincoln streets; at 2 p.m. Saturday at Revere Housing Authority on Constitution Avenue; at 2:25 p.m. Saturday on Vane Street; at 9:06 p.m. Saturday on Larkin Street; at 10:02 p.m. Saturday on Suffolk Avenue; at 10:19 p.m. Saturday on Haddon Street; at 10:42 p.m. Saturday on Proctor Avenue; at 11:07 p.m. Saturday on Washburn Avenue; at 12:37 a.m. Sunday on Sumner Street; at 12:39 a.m. Sunday on Fowler Avenue; at 1:26 a.m. Sunday on Proctor Avenue; at 2:48 p.m. Sunday at Harry Della Russo Stadium on Park Avenue; at 6:03 p.m. Sunday on Florence Avenue.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 4:06 p.m. Friday on Emmet Terrace; at 4:56 p.m. Friday on Revere Street; at 5:02 p.m. Saturday on Mccoba Street; at 7:56 p.m. Saturday at Lee’s Trailer Park on Revere Beach Parkway.

Theft

A report of a robbery at 3:23 a.m. Friday at Walgreens on Broadway.

A report of a larceny/forgery/fraud at 3:18 p.m. Friday on Cary Avenue; at 8:56 a.m. Sunday at Thrifty Car Rental on Lee Burbank Highway.

A report of a larceny from a motor vehicle at 12 p.m. Saturday on Cary Avenue.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 9:54 p.m. Sunday at Revere Housing Authority on Cooledge Street; at 10:21 p.m. Sunday at PLS Check Cashing on Beach Street.


SAUGUS

Arrests

Alessandro Desposito, of 41 Pilgrim Road, Medford, was arrested and charged with larceny at 5:12 p.m. Sunday.

Kyle R. Upton, of 18 Summit Terrace, Peabody, was arrested on warrants at 2:47 a.m. Monday.

Gustavo Vitorino, of 697 Boston St., Apt. 1, Lynn, was arrested and charged with OUI liquor and unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle at 11:26 p.m. Sunday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 12:18 p.m. Friday at Richard and Dudley streets; at 11:26 p.m. Sunday at 595 Lincoln Ave. Gustavo Vitorino, of Lynn, was arrested for OUI liquor.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:54 p.m. Friday at Lawndale and Lincoln avenues; at 3:51 p.m. Friday at Walmart at 770 Broadway; at 7:14 p.m. Saturday at Savers Department Store at 1160 Broadway.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 6:25 a.m. Monday at 52 Lincoln Ave.

Complaints

A report of a suspicious person at 11:51 a.m. Friday on Main Street. A caller reported an older man, with a peach golf shirt, was trying to open car doors and get inside. The caller reported the man seemed confused and didn’t mean any harm. Police were unable to find the man.

A report of suspicious activity at 11:46 p.m. Friday on Bristow Street. A caller reported a man sitting on the bench screaming to himself. Police reported the man had headphones on and was singing; at 2:59 p.m. Saturday at 3211 Founders Way. A caller reported UPS dropped off a package to her home, but it appeared that it was stolen.

A report of a disturbance at 1:36 a.m. Sunday at 16 Riverview Ave. A caller reported someone was at their door ringing the doorbell, and was asking for a missing cellphone; at 10:19 a.m. Sunday on Walden Terrace; at 10:57 a.m. Sunday at Walmart at 770 Broadway. A caller reported a man and woman walking around the store handing out flyers

Multiple callers reported ducklings trapped in a drain at the intersection at 4:42 p.m. Sunday at 345 Central St.

Fire

A report of a building fire at 8:40 p.m. Saturday at 15 Burnham Ave. Several callers reported a shed on fire. Heavy fire was knocked down by the fire department.

A report of an outside fire at 7:50 a.m. Sunday at Polcari’s Restaurant at 92 Broadway. A mulch fire was reported and extinguished; at 3:19 p.m. Sunday at 6 Dell Ave. A caller reported children knocked on his door to tell him about an outside fire. A second caller reported smoke behind her residence at 76 Broadway. A third caller reported the location was Walden Avenue and Hawkes Street. The fire department responded to Hawkes and Dell streets, where smoke was coming from the woods. The brush fire was extinguished. The fire captain reported crews responded to Standish Terrace and found a large area of the woods on fire, which was extinguished.


SWAMPSCOTT

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 3:53 a.m. Sunday at 115 Danvers Road; at 1:31 p.m. Sunday at 234 Humphrey St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 3:47 p.m. Sunday at Forbes Service Station at 441 Humphrey St.; at 1:35 a.m. Monday at 26 Shackle Way.

Genevieve L. Griggs, 98

LYNNMrs. Genevieve L. (DiFillipo) Griggs, 98, died peacefully on Saturday, May 20, 2017, after a brief illness. She was the wife of the late Robert C. Griggs, Sr., a fire inspector for the City of Lynn. Born on April 16, 1919, she was the daughter of the late Ferdinand and Antoinette (Zambrano) DiFillipo, was raised and educated in Lynn, and was a life-long resident there.

Genevieve worked for many years as a shoe worker in several different companies. She was a volunteer at Salem Hospital from 1986 to 2008. She was also a member of the San Rocco Society, and a past president of the St. Francis of Assisi Church Sodality. Genevieve was a vibrant and active woman who enjoyed bowling, knitting and crocheting, reading, playing cards, the game of Scrabble, spending time with her family, and traveling. She just generally enjoyed her long life. Una bella vita!

She is survived by her daughter, Linda J. Richmond and her husband Daniel; her son, Robert C. Griggs, Jr. and his wife Donna; five grandchildren, Daniel R. Richmond, Jr. and his wife Angel, Antoinette Robinson and her husband David, Elizabeth Richmond, Tara Barton and her husband Charles, and Tanya Mateer and her husband James; nine great-grandchildren; Louis Grande, Oriana Richmond, Daniel Richmond Ill., Anna Linda and Katherine Guido, and Ethan and Abigail Mateer, Lance Corporal Matthew Robinson, USMC, and Victoria Robinson; as well as one great-great-grandson; Noah Grande; and several nieces and nephews. She was the grandmother of the late Jennifer M. Richmond and sister of the late Vito, Antonio, Felice, Fiorey, Ruggerio and Fred DiFillipo, Rose Adamian, Viola Giamberardino, and Edith Toszkowski. The family would like to thank Genevieve’s favorite staff at Phillips Manor Nursing Home in Lynn for the exceptional care and love they gave to Genevieve.

Service information: Her funeral will be held on Thursday at 10 a.m. from the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Rt 129), Lynn, followed by a funeral Mass at 11 a.m. in Holy Family Church, Lynn. Burial will be in St. Joseph’s Cemetery. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. Visiting hours are Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. Those who prefer may make donations to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. Directions and guestbook at Solimine.com.

Anne E. Check, 90

LYNNAnne E. (Dacyczyn) Check, 90, of Lynn, died Friday at her home. She was the wife of the late Henry E. Check, Sr. Born and raised in South Deerfield, she was the daughter of the late Alec and Anna (Klemyk) Dacyczyn. She was a graduate of Deerfield High School, class of 1943, and also attended Northampton Commercial College. She moved to Lynn in 1945, when she met her husband, and made her home there.

Anne had worked as a research clerk at Eastern Bank until her retirement. She had an active life. She was a line dancer, enjoyed traveling, bingo, gardening, and nature. She was an avid Red Sox and Patriots fan. Anne was a member of the Franco-American Club of Beverly and the Golden Age Club of Peabody. She will be well remembered by her family and friends as a fun and dedicated person.

She is survived by her daughter; Anne-Marie Darsney and her husband William of Savannah, Ga.; her daughter-in-law, Nilza Check of Raymond, N.H.; four grandchildren; Jennifer Lowry and her husband Derek, James Darsney and his wife Kris, Jeremy Check and Kelly Morris; seven great-grandchildren; her brother Roman Dacyczyn of South Deerfield; as well as many nieces and nephews. She was the mother of the late John Check and Henry E. Check, Jr. and sister of the late Joseph and Walter Dacyczyn, Sophie Gulowka, Olga Bobersky and Irene Luke.

Service information: Her funeral will be held on Friday at 11 a.m. from the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Rt 129), Lynn. Burial will be in Pine Grove Cemetery, Lynn. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. Visiting hours are Thursday from 4-7 p.m. Those who prefer may make donations to Bridgewell, 10 Dearborn Road, Peabody, MA 01960 or at Bridgewell.org. Directions and guestbook at Solimine.com.

Jeanine M. Dion, 59

LYNNJeanine Marie Dion, 59, of Salem, passed away unexpectedly at her home in Lynn.

Born in Salem, Mass., Jeanine was the daughter of the late Lionel and Eleanor (Ahearn) Dion. Jeanine was a graduate of Salem schools and worked in maintenance at Salem State University for over 20 years.

Jeanine is survived by a brother, Robert Dion, her loving cousins, Mary Ellen, Kathy, Kathleen, Joanne, Patsy and Paul, her nephews, Kevin, Michael, Brian and Bubba, her special friends, Frances, Mary, Jessica and many other uncles, aunts, cousins and her friends from Salem State University. Along with her parents, Jeanine was predeceased by her brother, Richard Dion.

Service information: Relatives and friends are invited to visitation at BERUBE & SONS Funeral Home, 191 Lafayette St., Salem, Mass., on Tuesday, May 23, from 9-11 a.m., with a memorial service in the funeral home at 11 a.m. Burial will follow at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Salem. Guest book is available at BerubeFuneralHome.com.

Daniels E. D’Eon, 71

LYNNMr. Daniels Ellsworth D’Eon, age 71, a lifelong resident of Lynn, passed away on Thursday, May 18, 2017, at his home, surrounded by his family. He was the beloved husband of Elizabeth “Betty” (Herbst) D’Eon, with whom he shared 50 years of marriage.

Born and educated in Lynn, he was the son of the late Chet D’Eon and Charlotte (Tarbox) D’Eon-Johnson. He was a graduate of Lynn Trade High School and received his Associates Degree in Drafting from Merrimack College. He served in the U.S. Airforce during the Vietnam War. Dan loved to golf and bowl and was an avid Boston sports fan. Most of all, Dan enjoyed spending time with his entire family, especially his grandchildren.

Dan is survived by his loving children, Shawn D’Eon and his wife, Heather, of Lynn, Kevin D’Eon and his wife, Melissa, of Brentwood, N.H., and Alissa and her husband, Joseph Hoggard, of Londonderry, N.H., and his cherished grandchildren, Kaylee, Ava, Maya, Jenna, Demetrious, Justin and Brandon.

Service information: A memorial visitation will be held on Tuesday, May 23, from 4-7 p.m. at the CUFFE-MCGINN Funeral Home, 157 Maple St., Lynn, 781-599-3901. Relatives and friends are invited. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Dan’s memory to CCALS, Compassionate Care ALS, P.O. Box 1052, West Falmouth, MA 02574, or via www.ccals.org, or to VNA Hospice & Palliative Care, 199 Rosewood Drive, Suite 180, Danvers, MA 01923, or via www.vnacare.org. For the online guest book please visit Cuffemcginn.com.

 

Frederick C. Fabrizio, 87

LynnMr. Frederick C. Fabrizio, age 87 years, of Lynn, died Wednesday at Salem Hospital after a lengthy illness. He was the husband of the late Gloria (Mudge) Fabrizio, with whom he shared 50 years of marriage.

Born in Swampscott, he was the son of the Harry and Dorothy (Hill) Fabrizio. Fred was employed as a Sand Hog and Blaster with Local #88, and has worked for several large construction companies in the Boston and North Shore area. Fred liked horse races, hunting, fishing, playing cards, going to Foxwoods and spending time with his family. He also enjoyed traveling with his late wife.

He is survived by two daughters, Margaret A. Wynne of Klamath Falls, Ore., Doreen and her husband, Gary Baker, of Lynn, two sons, Frederick C. Fabrizio Jr., and his wife, Diana, of Lynn, Todd A. Fabrizio of Billerica, one sister, Mary and her husband, Tony Uva, of Derry, N.H., and his sister-in-law, Elizabeth Fabrizio and late brother, Robert Fabrizio, of Lynn, many grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his son, Michael A. Fabrizio, and brother, Joe Fabrizio.

Service information: A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Holy Family Church, Bessom Street, Lynn, on Wednesday at 10:30 a.m., to which relatives and friends are invited to attend. Burial will follow in Pine Grove Cemetery. Please make memorial donations in Fred’s name to the American Heart Assoc., 20 Speen St., Framingham, MA 01701-4688, or the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International, 60 Walnut St., Wellesley, MA 02481. Guest book at parkermemorialfuneralhome.com.

 

Public hearing requested on future of Union ER

FILE PHOTO
View of Union Hospital.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN Six community organizations and unions have asked the panel deciding the fate of emergency care after Union Hospital closes to make their deliberations public.

In a letter to the Urgent/Emergent Care Planning Group, which includes hospital executives and public officials, the groups suggested a hearing be held at an accessible location in the evening, and publicized in advance, with notices in English and Spanish.

“We want our voices and concerns about care to be heard,” said Pamela Edwards, an organizer at the Massachusetts Senior Action Council, a grassroots organization that encourages its members to address policy issues that affect their health. “Many seniors believe Partners HealthCare is not listening to them and don’t care about us.”

The New Lynn Coalition, North Shore Labor Council, 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, Neighbor to Neighbor, Massachusetts Education Fund, and the Senior Action Council are in agreement that the panel has lacked transparency. They said it’s been very hard to get information about the discussions since the sessions are closed to the public.  

“We are writing because it is critical that the Urgent/Emergent Care Planning Group share its findings and recommendations with Lynn as soon as possible by way of a public forum,” the letter said.

Last year, the state Department of Public Health approved a $180 million expansion of North Shore Medical Center (NSMC) that will close Union and move the beds to the new Salem campus in 2019. The medical facilities in Lynn and Salem are a part of Partners.

Dr. David J. Roberts, NSMC’s president, said the city’s only hospital will be shuttered in the fall of 2019 and sold. The sale could be sooner if the need for service continues to dwindle, he said.

While Roberts has pledged to maintain ER services in Lynn, it’s unclear where they would be housed.

“It would seem that events are accelerating faster than originally anticipated. Union Hospital patients, as well as 1199SEIU members and the Lynn community deserve to know what is being planned to provide for their emergent healthcare needs, on how emergency care will provided once Union Hospital closes,” according to the letter.

At its most recent meeting last month, the public and the press were barred from the working session at City Hall. At the time, Laura Fleming, a hospital spokeswoman, could not explain why the public was excluded.

Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy did not respond to a request for comment. State Sen. Thomas McGee (D-Lynn) declined comment.

Fleming declined to be interviewed. In a statement, she defended the Urgent/Emergent Care Planning Group’s private  meetings.

Once the planning group has completed its preliminary review,  it will bring forward data and options for broader discussion and community input,” she wrote in an email.   Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Having a blast at Bent Water Brewing Co.

ITEM PHOTO | KATIE MORRISON
People packed Bent Water’s outdoor patio for the second-annual “Bent Water Blast Off.”

By MATT DEMIRS

LYNN  Bent Water Brewing Co. raised more than $5,000 Saturday for Beyond Walls, a nonprofit whose mission is to brighten the downtown.

“One of the biggest things the craft beer industry is all about is paying back to the community,” said Caitlin Kreitman, Bent Water’s event manager. “We’re beering it forward by using our beer to support the community.”

The event attracted 1,100 people. While admission was free, a donation of $5-$10 was suggested with proceeds going to Beyond Walls. The work the group is doing in the downtown will boost the city’s morale, Kreitman said.

“Beautifying anything automatically picks someone up,” she said. “The fact that it’s a crowd funded, Lynn supported, Lynn grassroots organization, that’s what we love.”

Amanda Hill, associate director of Beyond Walls, said the volunteer group is completing four projects. The plans include underpass lighting in Central Square, the installation of a dozen neon lights in the downtown, a mural festival in July featuring local and international artists, and a sculpture of a General Electric Co. jet engine.

Hill said Beyond Walls’ initiatives demonstrate a great showing of community support.

“It is nice to see everyone come together to rally around a common cause,” she said.

Beyond Walls’ online crowdfunding portal, patronicity.com/lynn, closes tonight after a successful two-month effort. The group hopes to reach its stretch goal by raising $15,000 before 11:45 p.m.

On Saturday night, people gathered around artist Chris “Tallboy” Coulon from Beyond Walls who painted a mural on the grain storage container.

Tallboy wasn’t the only local talent.

Corinn Bacon, a Lynn English High School graduate and aspiring musician, performed with her band, Foxes. It was the band’s second time playing at the Bent Water.

“It was amazing being invited and performing at the event, especially having come from the area,” she said. “Being able to support a cause that benefits the people of your hometown was an honor.”

The second annual “Bent Water Blast Off” capped off American Craft Beer Week. The brewery presented six new beers including Sluice Juice #4, Sherry Baby II, White Rose, Concrete Kiss, X-Series No. 17, and Blast Off.

Patrons raved about White Rose, a coffee IPA named after the White Rose Coffeehouse in Central Square.

“I’ve never tried a beer with coffee in it before,” said Kate Walsh. “I really like it though and I love that it is named after my favorite coffee shop.”

Bent Water is a self-canning, self-distributing brewery with an onsite taproom featuring 13 rotating taps. It is the city’s only brewery.

Kreitman said the release of the new beers will hopefully attract business in the summer months.

“That’s why we called it the blast off event,” she said.  “It’s a nice fun event that launches everyone off into summer.”


Matt Demirs can be reached at mdemirs@itemlive.com.

Police log: 5-22-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

 

LYNN

 

Arrests

Genesis Acosta, 24, of 33 Lincoln St., was arrested and charged with OUI liquor, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, negligent operation of a motor vehicle and miscellaneous equipment violation at 2:41 a.m. Sunday.

 

John Burgess, 32, of 10 Dartmouth St., was arrested and charged with two counts of receiving stolen property at 11:55 a.m. Sunday.

 

Jose Cadiz-Matos, 30, of 47 Essex St., was arrested and charged with violation of the city knife ordinance at 12:35 a.m. Saturday.

 

Jonathan Colon, 31, of 33 Lincoln St., was arrested and charged with operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license, OUI liquor and on warrants at 2:39 a.m. Sunday.

 

Elvin Coreano, of 56 Lawton St., was arrested on warrant charges of receiving stolen property and daytime breaking and entering for a felony at 4:11 a.m. Saturday.

 

Jeremiah Davis, 25, of 34 Hanover St., was arrested and charged with larceny from a building at 3:16 p.m. Saturday.

 

Gustavo Merida, 53, of 30 Morris St., was arrested on a courtesy booking at 12:06 a.m. Sunday.

 

Andrew Mumbauer, 29, of 24 Rogers Ave., was arrested and charged with failure to disperse at 3:49 a.m. Sunday.

 

Cristian Polanco, 22, was arrested and charged with drug possession with intent to distribute at 3:52 a.m. Saturday.

 

Melissa Shields, 25, of 2 Oakland St., was arrested on a warrant charge of larceny by false pretense at 11:36 p.m. Saturday.

 

Laurel Tidmarsh, 60, of 23 Alison Way, was arrested and charged with OUI liquor second offense at 9:33 p.m. Friday.

 

Diane Tolbert, of 100 Willow St., was arrested on a warrant charge of larceny at 10:35 p.m. Friday.

 

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 12:59 p.m. Friday at 371 Summer St.; at 2 p.m. Friday at 525 Boston St.; at 3:10 p.m. Friday at Boston and New Park streets; at 5:19 p.m. Friday on Federal Street; at 6:17 p.m. Friday at 17 Hollingsworth St.; at 6:24 p.m. Friday on Chase Road; at 6:27 p.m. Friday at Sachem and Sagamore streets; at 12:17 a.m. Saturday at 593 Boston St.; at 9:03 a.m. Saturday at 102 Western Ave.; at 9:03 a.m. Saturday at Chatham Street and Western Avenue; at 10:10 a.m. Saturday at 300 Broad St.; at 2:56 p.m. Saturday at 158 Chestnut St.; at 3:16 p.m. Saturday at 57 Market St.; at 4:28 p.m. Saturday at 106 Lawton Ave.; at 9:10 p.m. Saturday at Ford and Locust streets; at 6:34 a.m. Sunday at 356 Maple St.; at 8:53 a.m. Sunday on Broadway; at 9:26 a.m. Sunday at Essex and Rockaway streets.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 7:07 p.m. Friday at 100 Parkland Ave.; at 2:58 a.m. Saturday at Goldfish Pond at 0 Lafayette Park; at 6:01 p.m. Saturday on Western Avenue.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 9:55 p.m. Friday at 159 Washington St.; at 10:22 p.m. Friday at Holyoke and Walnut streets; at 11:55 a.m. Saturday at 765 Lynnfield St.; at 2:44 a.m. Sunday at 170 South Common St.

 

Assaults

A report of an assault and battery at 11:49 p.m. Saturday on Circuit Avenue.

 

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 2:17 p.m. Friday at 54 Elm St.; at 6:29 p.m. Friday at 33 Newcastle St.; at 5:39 a.m. Sunday at 60 Boston St.

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 4:11 p.m. Friday at 47 Flint St.; at 4:29 p.m. Friday at 29 Boston St.

 

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 12:50 p.m. Friday at KFC at 720 Lynnway; at 2:16 p.m. Friday at 204 Curwin Circle; at 5:54 p.m. Friday at Gibbs Gas Station at 240 Western Ave.; at 7:28 p.m. Friday at 573 Chestnut St.; at 8:02 p.m. Friday at 51 Chatham St.; at 8:30 p.m. Friday at 26 Childs St.; at 10:02 p.m. Friday at Boston and North Federal streets; at 11:56 p.m. Friday at 2 Brightwood Terrace; at 5:31 a.m. Saturday at 10 Iona Terrace; at 6:37 a.m. Saturday at 75 Johnson St.; at 6:32 p.m. Saturday at 810 Lynnway; at 9:26 p.m. Saturday at 10 Iona Terrace; at 10:07 p.m. Saturday at Northern Avenue Playground on Northern Avenue; at 10:31 p.m. Saturday at 65 Centre St.; at 11:44 p.m. Saturday  at 138 South Common St.; at 3:49 a.m. Sunday at Wendy’s at 116 Boston St.; at 9:54 a.m. Sunday at 13 Seaside Terrace; at 11:38 a.m. Sunday at 33 Waverly St.

A report of a gunshot at 9:57 p.m. Friday at 206 Fays Ave.; at 10:59 a.m. Saturday on Beacon Hill Avenue; at 10:10 p.m. Saturday on Sargents Court.

 

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 9:07 a.m. Sunday on Essex Street.

 

Theft

A report of a larceny at 1:27 p.m. Friday at 95 Ashland St.; at 9:58 a.m. Saturday at 112 Market St.; at 11:15 a.m. Saturday at 2 Victory Road; at 11:48 a.m. Saturday at 112 Market St.; at 8:01 a.m. Sunday at 100 Willow St.

A report of a robbery at 3:06 p.m. Friday at 24 Rockmere Gardens.

A report of motor vehicle theft at 5:22 p.m. Friday at 14 Oakcrest Road; at 4:49 p.m. Saturday at MBTA Parking Garage at 186 Market St.; at 9:55 a.m. Sunday on Wallace Road.

 

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 4:14 p.m. Friday at 9 Milton St.


MARBLEHEAD

 

Arrests

Lawrence J. Littler, 51, of 406 Paradise Road, Apt. 1M, Swampscott, was arrested on a warrant at 12:53 p.m. Friday.

 

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 4:47 p.m. Friday on Humphrey Street.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 5:01 p.m. Friday on Jersey Street.

 

Complaints

A caller reported an underage drinking party at 11:26 p.m. Friday on Elmwood Road. A caller reported several underage kids appeared to be drunk and carrying several cases of beer.

A caller reported hearing a window break at 12:18 a.m. Saturday on Brown Street. The caller thought her home was being broken into. Her husband checked the property, and no windows were broken into, but she thought it could be one of her neighbors’. Police checked the caller’s home and surrounding residences, and reported everything appeared to be in order.

A caller reported a woman in her 70s in traffic was trying to stop cars going by at 10:09 a.m. Saturday on Jersey Street. Police checked and reported the woman was gone.

A caller reported a bus was stuck, causing havoc at 12:26 p.m. Saturday at Front and Franklin streets. Police checked and reported the bus was gone.

 

Theft

A report of stolen bikes at 4:12 p.m. Saturday on Martin Terrace.


PEABODY

 

Arrests

Peter G. Burgess, 35, of 88 Aborn St., Apt. 2, was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise, second offense at 11:53 a.m. Sunday.

 

Allison P. Lheureux, 33, of 15 Coolidge Ave., was arrested and charged with OUI liquor at 10:12 p.m. Saturday.

 

Hedmer Pojoy Tobar, 34, of 19 Sydney Road, Apt. 3, Lynn, was arrested and charged with operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license at 5:25 p.m. Friday.

 

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 3:54 p.m. Friday at Direct Tire & Auto Service at 231 Andover St. A two-car accident was reported. The driver of one car was taken to Beverly Hospital. A passenger in the other car was taken to Salem Hospital; at 12:27 a.m. Saturday at 2 Clearwater Road; at 4:47 p.m. Sunday at 5 Sutton St. and 2 Putnam St. A two-car accident was reported. Four people were taken to Salem Hospital. Both vehicles were towed.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 11:58 a.m. Saturday at 117 Lynn St.; at 7:42 p.m. Saturday at 112 Lowell St.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 7:53 p.m. Saturday at 107 Main St.; at 11:44 a.m. Sunday at 16 Crowninshield St.

 

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 10:59 p.m. Friday at 67 Harrison Ave.; at 10:50 p.m. Saturday at Mobile Estates at 286 Newbury St.; at 10:56 p.m. Saturday at 21 Murdock Drive; at 12:06 a.m. Sunday at 108 Tremont St.; at 12:28 a.m. Sunday at 21 Murdock Drive; at 12:43 a.m. Sunday at Tedeschi Food Shop at 598 Lowell St.; at 1:38 a.m. Sunday at Oliveira’s Steak House at 74 Walnut St.; at 1:42 a.m. Sunday at 6 Anthony Road; at 1:42 a.m. Sunday at 26 Summit Terrace; at 1:52 a.m. Sunday at 2 Jeffrey St.; at 1:09 p.m. Sunday at Bebe at 210B Andover St.; at 6:05 p.m. Sunday at 32 Nancy Ave. and 26 Edythe Lane.

A report of suspicious activity at 12:13 p.m. Saturday at 63 Central St. and 2 Tremont St. A passing motorist reported there was a man punching himself. He was described as a white man in his late 20s to 30s, and had bandages on his right arm. Police couldn’t find the man after an area check; at 4:15 p.m. Saturday at 42 Russell St. and 33 Roosevelt Ave. A suspicious man in and out of traffic was reported. Police checked the area, but couldn’t find the man; at 11:41 p.m. Saturday at 37 Shore Drive. A caller reported the occupant of a suspicious car appeared to be checking on the tires/wheels of other vehicles in the parking lot. The caller was concerned the person was trying to steal car parts. Police reported the person had lost a ring and was looking around the area it may have been lost; at 11:15 a.m. Sunday at 274 Lynnfield St. A caller reported a car occupied by two men drove by and they threw firecrackers at him. He confronted them and they parked on the street across from his house. Police spoke with the men and they were sent off.

A report of a neighborhood dispute at 8 p.m. Saturday at 7 Hilltop Drive. A caller reported a neighbor threw a lacrosse ball off the siding and damaged his home. An officer spoke with the neighbor who agreed to pay for the damage to the siding of the residence.

 

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 8:46 p.m. Friday on King Street. The person was taken to Lahey Hospital.

 

Theft

A report of a larceny at 5:35 p.m. Sunday at 202 Brooksby Village Drive. A caller reported her purse was stolen from her apartment. An officer found the purse in the apartment.

 

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 7:59 a.m. Saturday at BMW of Peabody at 221 Andover St. The manager reported vandalism to several vehicles on the property over the past few days. Police reported emblems were taken from two vehicles; at 11:53 a.m. Sunday at 14 Roycroft Road. A caller reported three slashed tires on a car. Police reported there are no suspects.

Elizabeth M. MacDonald

PLYMOUTH — Elizabeth M. (King) MacDonald, M.D., of Plymouth, formerly of Lynn, died peacefully in her home on May 19, 2017 after a long illness. She was the beloved wife of Leo J. Macdonald Jr., M.D.

Loving mother to Leo J. MacDonald III and his wife Nina of Raleigh, N.C., Michael J. MacDonald and his wife Berline of Newport, Ky., Brian C. MacDonald of Lynnfield, Robert D. MacDonald and his wife Elva of Sagamore Beach and John A. MacDonald and his wife Dawn of Virginia Beach, Va., and Nancy Rodig and her husband Scott of Westwood. Sister of Marian Ambrosiano of Long Island, N.Y., and Eleanor Hefferin of Ft. Myers, Fla. Also survived by 10 grandchildren.

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Oct. 21, 1927, daughter of the late Michael and Louise (Herrmann) King. She was educated in Long Island, N.Y., and a graduate of Hunter College and Down State NY Medical School in Brooklyn, N.Y. Dr. MacDonald was a longtime pediatrician along with her husband, having a private practice in Lynn for more than 46 years. Dr. MacDonald worked also with the Lynn school system for many years as the schools pediatrician, she was a member of the choir at St. Joseph’s Church in Lynn and active with the Community Theater Group in Winthrop.

Service information: Funeral from the DAVIS Funeral & Cremation Home, 619 State Road, Plymouth (Manomet) on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 at 9:15 a.m., followed by a funeral Mass in St. Bonaventure’s Church, Manomet at 10  a.m. Visiting hours at the Davis Funeral Home on Tuesday from 5-8 p.m. Burial in St. Joseph’s Cemetery in Plymouth. Memorial donations in her name may be made to Shriner’s Hospital for Children. For more info and online guest book please visit www.cartmelldavis.com.

 

Brian T. McCafferty, 72

Brian Thomas McCafferty, 72, husband of J. Beth McCafferty of Florida, formerly of Lynn and Salem, passed away peacefully at home, on May 10, 2017, surrounded by his family.

Born in Glasgow, Scotland, he was the son of the late Thomas and Mary McCafferty. A graduate of Northeastern University, Brian was employed at General Electric and Sanders Associates before becoming a producibility engineer at Textron, a position he held for many years. In his retirement, he enjoyed his time in Florida with his wife Beth and their two dogs Bailey and Buddy.

In addition to his loving wife Beth, he is also survived by his two children and their spouses, Barry and Jordan McCafferty of Swampscott and Erin and Chris Bailey of Middleton; as well as two beautiful grandchildren, Alexander and McKenzie Bailey. He also leaves behind his siblings, Thomas and his wife Karen of Middleton, Frank and his wife Deborah of Peabody; his sister, Arlene Burgoyne of Townsend and his sister Patricia and her husband Scott Henry of Lynn. In addition, he also leaves many nieces and nephews.

Service information: Funeral services at the request of the family are private. A memorial celebration of his life will take place at a later date. Contributions may be made in his memory to the charity of one’s choice.

 

Timothy F. Dempsey Jr.

Rev. Mr. Timothy F. Dempsey Jr., a deacon with the Lynn Catholic Collaborative of St. Mary’s and Sacred Heart Churches, died on Friday, May 19, 2017, in Salem Hospital after a long illness. He was the husband of Julie (Aucoin) Dempsey.

He was born and raised in Lynn and lived in Lynn all of his life. Tim was the son of the late Timothy F. Dempsey Sr. and Christina M. (Callahan) Dempsey. He graduated from St. Mary’s Boys High School and earned a B.S. from Boston College. Later, Tim went on to study at St. John’s Seminary and was ordained a deacon on May 17, 1980.

Tim specialized in computer programming at M.I.T. for 30 years. He sat on the Board of Directors at St. Mary’s Plaza and St. Theresa House. He loved to read, and most of all he loved his family and his church.

In addition to Julie, with whom he shared almost 53 years of marriage, Tim leaves his three children, Michael and wife Tammy of Crockett, Calif., Christie Donahue and husband Dan of Southborough, and John and wife Heloise of Washington, D.C. He also is survived by his grandchildren, Eliott and Arthur Dempsey, Max, Will, and Owen Donahue and Alex Ramos. Tim also leaves his brother, Edward Dempsey and wife Eileen of Martha’s Vineyard, as well as several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Service information: Tim’s funeral will be held on Tuesday, May 23, 2017, at 12 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church, 8 South Common St., Lynn. Burial will be in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Lynn. Visiting hours are Monday from 4-8 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church. Arrangements are by the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, Lynn. Directions and guestbook at www.solimine.com.

 

Geraldine F. Cronin, 67

LYNN — Geraldine F. “Geri” Cronin, age 67, a lifelong resident of Lynn, died suddenly, Thursday, May 18, 2017 surrounded by her loved ones at Mass General Hospital, Boston.

Born in Lynn, she was the daughter of the late Frederick B. Cronin Sr. and Bridie M. (Dunn) Cronin. She graduated from Lynn English High School, Class of 1968, and the Catherine Hinds School of Aesthetics, Newton.

She worked at GE for 28 years before leaving to pursue her passion as an aesthetician. She was the proprietor of About Face Skin Salon for 25 years, which was the first skin salon in the city of Lynn.

Geri was a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Lynn Museum, and the Friends of Lynn and Nahant Beach. She won the John Sullivan Community Award in 2012 from the Lynn Housing Authority for her various volunteer work as well as won Business Woman of the Year in 2005. She volunteered at Relay for Life Cancer Walk, Teen Drop in Center, LHAND, as well as various other organizations. Her favorite charity was Santa’s Helping Hands, where she was a board member and played Mrs. Claus for 35 years.   

Geri leaves her beloved brothers and sisters, Matthew H. Baxter and his wife Marie of Methuen, Frederick B. Cronin Jr. and his wife Helen of Lynn, Gordon J. Cronin and his wife Donna of Lynn, Mary A. Cronin-LoPresti and her husband John of Lynn, Margie A. Cronin of Lynn, and Adrian M. Cronin and his wife Diane of Lynn. She was also the sister of the late Helen I. Beauchamp, Ralph W. Cronin, Joseph A. Cronin and Kathleen Cronin. Geri also leaves her aunt, Mary Dunne of Rockland, as well as many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews whom she dearly loved.

Service information: Geri’s funeral will be held from the CUFFE-MCGINN Funeral Home, 157 Maple St., Lynn, on Tuesday, May 23 at 10 a.m., followed by a funeral Mass in St. Pius V Church, 215 Maple St., Lynn at 11 a.m. Burial will follow in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Lynn. Visiting hours will be held in the funeral home on Monday, May 22 from 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the Shriners Hospital for Children, 51 Blossom St., Boston, MA 02114 or Santa’s Helping Hands, P.O. Box 27 Lynn, MA 01903. She was a proud member of the Lynn Community and will be greatly missed by all who knew her. For directions or to sign the online guestbook, please visit www.cuffemcginn.com.

 

I am the best person for the job, McGee says

PHOTO BY BOB ROCHE
State Sen. Thomas McGee stands with his brother, Shawn, and former babysitter Mae DeLuca.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — State Sen. Thomas McGee (D-Lynn) launched his bid for mayor Friday night before more than 300 enthusiastic supporters at the Knights of Columbus.

“My name is Tom McGee and tonight I proudly kick off my campaign for mayor of Lynn,” he said. “I am running because I love our city and the values the city of Lynn represents.”

The 61-year-old senator will face incumbent Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy, a Republican, who kicked off her campaign for a third term last month.

Consider the progress we’ve made, Kennedy says

McGee’s daughter, Katherine, 19, introduced her father.

“He never missed a softball game, a dance recital, a golf match or a swim meet and I know if I really needed him he would jump in his car and make the six-hour drive to Villanova,” she said. “One of the things I admire most about my dad is his love for Lynn. He has lived here his whole life and always showed Thomas and me all the wonderful qualities Lynn has. I don’t think it’s possible for his heart to hold more love for this city.”

McGee was elected to Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1994 to represent West Lynn and Nahant. After four terms, he won a seat in the Senate in 2002 in a district that includes Lynn, Lynnfield, Marblehead, Nahant, Saugus and Swampscott.

Lynn teacher joins the march

Michael O’Connor, a Lynn firefighter for 22 years, said he is a strong McGee backer.

“He’s been a lifelong friend,” he said.  “I think he’ll move the city in the right direction.”

Janet Dolan, a Nahant resident, said McGee has always represented the district, including Nahant, very well.

“He’s very visible, very open to help, if anyone is in difficulty I think he’s very reliable,” she said.

David Condon, chairman of the Massachusetts Motorcycle Association, said his group has been a longtime supporter of McGee.

“We’ve had a very good working relationship over the years and he will make a difference as mayor of Lynn,” he said.

McGee said this is a critical time for the city as it faces an enormous budget challenge.

“Our city is at a crossroads and the next four years will be critical in determining Lynn’s future,” he said. “Under current leadership, our city is faced with an emerging fiscal crisis that threatens public safety and erodes people’s confidence in Lynn’s ability to manage its own affairs and jeopardizes our potential for attracting new families and businesses. We need to harness all that Lynn has to offer.”

McGee said he’s the right person for the job.

“I believe I am the best person to lead our city at such a critical time,” he said. “I ask you to join me in working for the betterment of this city.”

In the race for cash, McGee is way ahead. In the most recent filing with the Massachusetts Office of Campaign Finance. McGee reported a balance of $69,170 while Kennedy had less than $13,000.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Brothers face murder for fatal brick attack

PHOTO BY PAULA MULLER
Werner Garcia Figueroa and Selvin F. Garcia are arraigned on multiple charges including murder.

BY ADAM SWIFT

LYNN Two Lynn brothers pleaded not guilty Friday in Lynn District Court in connection with a fatal attack May 14 on Blake Street.

Werner Garcia Figueroa, 19, of 15 Bassett St. in Lynn and Selvin F. Garcia, 23, were ordered held without bail by Judge Cathleen Campbell. A probable cause hearing is scheduled for June 27.

Both men were charged with murder, armed robbery, and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

The two men laid in wait to attack Sergio Sanchez, 39, of Reading and his brother, Antonio, 33, of Lynn, following an argument in the early morning hours of May 14 at Las Vegas Y Restaurante on Munroe Street, according to Assistant District Attorney Ashlee Logan.

She said the defendants beat Sergio Sanchez with a hard object, believed to be a brick.

“After the defendants ran from the scene, Antonio Sanchez called 911,” Logan said. “The two defendants returned and began beating Antonio Sanchez again and stole his phone. After beating Antonio, they kicked Sergio as he was laying on the ground.”

Driver crashes, knocks power in Swampscott

Sergio Sanchez died from his injuries the next morning. Antonio Sanchez was injured but expected to recover.

The defendants were identified by patrons and staff at the restaurant, as well as through video surveillance, Logan said.

But Selvin Garcia’s attorney, Edward Hayden, said his client maintains his innocence and that he will be mounting a vigorous defense. Hayden noted that the defense has yet to see the video surveillance mentioned by the prosecutor.

Prior to the arraignment, Campbell ruled that the police report be withheld from the public due to damage its release could cause to an ongoing murder investigation.

After looking in the direction of reporters in the courtroom, Logan asked that anyone who had previously taken a copy of the police report return it. WCVB Channel 5 reporter Sera Congi was called to the bench, but after conferring with attorneys and Campbell, it was determined that Congi had looked at the police report before tweeting about it, but had not taken a physical copy.

 

Lynn artist inspired by inspiring others

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Lynn artist Michael Aghahowa speaks about what inspires his art.

By BRIDGET TURCOTTE

LYNN — A Lynn artist with a knack for giving back to the community delivered the student commencement speech at his graduation from Montserrat College of Art Friday.

Michael Aghahowa, 23, and the first male in his family to graduate college, was chosen by his peers to deliver the speech during the commencement ceremonies.

Montserrat, located in Beverly, is a nonprofit, independent art school accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.

When he started school, he quickly found the lonely artist stereotype to be true, he said. His classmates kept to themselves and he found it difficult to form relationships. In an effort to get people together, he created flyers inviting everyone to his apartment for pancakes.

“I figured if people won’t come out for each other, they’ll definitely come out for breakfast. So I invited everyone to my house,” he said.

The pancake feast was well attended and quickly became a weekly tradition. Even as he crossed the stage at graduation, freshmen he had never met knew him as the pancake man, he said.

“I’ve always been about getting people together,” he said. “Everyone has differences. We’re all different. But as long as we can understand each other we can respect each other.”

The philosophy is what drives much of his work.

The paintings featured in his senior show included a portrait of his family sitting around the dinner table. He’s depicted as a younger child to express that time can change. Before the internet, he said his family would more commonly sit down and have a conversation. As someone who values a sense of community, family dinners are something he wishes he could get back.

Another piece is a self-portrait inspired by Jim Crow propaganda with large red lips.

I am the best person for the job, McGee says

“These pieces — I feel like if I make them about me and you can get an understanding for how I feel, you can respect me,” he said.

In the midst of pursuing a degree in illustration and painting, Aghahowa, who grew up on Sachem Street, volunteers at Raw Art Works and Gregg Neighborhood House.

A RAW alumnus, he was first exposed to the program in middle school, but remembers its annual block party from long before.

“Art therapy is an interest of mine,” he said. “I really like working with children. I can walk down the street and see a green car against a red building and get excited about it. Kids look at things like that and they get excited too. They have that creative perspective. Plus I can just be goofy and it’s fun. It’s a break from hanging out with adults.”

Aghahowa was partly inspired to create art by cartoons. He said he wanted to create something that made people happy the same way that cartoons made him happy as a child.

Working with children in kindergarten through grade 8 at the Gregg House, Aghahowa said it feels good to be a positive male influence.

“A lot of these kids are thinking about college and they have so many hopes and dreams,” he said. “For them to see me doing something so nontraditional — I just keep telling them that if there’s something they want to do, if they want to go to school, they should do it.”

Montserrat, though a scholarship fund provided by New England Biolabs, provides scholarships each year to students from RAW.

A volunteer in more than seven of RAW’s programs, he most recently played a part in creating the HOME exhibit, which was unveiled Thursday. His piece, a key with the word zesty printed on its side and a crown as the tooth, is representative of his mother and grandmother because he was raised by queens with zesty attitudes, he said.

Aghahowa said as he and his classmates move on with their lives, he hopes they’ll take the values of respecting people for their differences and keeping an open mind, and spread them throughout their communities.


Bridget Turcotte can be reached at bturcotte@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @BridgetTurcotte.

Entertainment, education at ‘Harrington Reads’

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Amanda Kennedy’s K-2 class looks on as Lynn Museum Executive Director Drew Russo reads “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle.

By STEVE KRAUSE

LYNN — There’s something unnerving and empowering standing in front of a room full of fifth-graders telling them about the joys of reading.

That would seem to be a conflict of emotions, but it’s true. It’s unnerving because you see all these faces, and all these people of different shapes and sizes and nationalities just waiting to hear the pearls of wisdom coming out of the mouth of a man upon whom they’ve never laid eyes. You can only hope you don’t disappoint.

And it’s empowering because children from one generation to the next don’t change very much. Their minds are like sponges. They absorb a tremendous amount and they retain it. They may all look at you with blank faces, but the wheels are turning inside.

It was into this maelstrom of humanity I walked Friday morning at the Harrington School. It was “Harrington Reads” day, in which people with a certain degree of visibility go into the classrooms and read to the students. The idea is to reinforce to them the value of reading, not only as entertainment but for education as well.

I got a fifth-grade class — a great age. And before we got down to it, I wanted to give them my view of why I think it’s so important to develop good reading habits. It’s because beyond entertainment or education, books provide a portal into the hearts and minds of their characters much better than television and movies. I asked how many of the fifth-graders understood what “portal” meant, and no one answered. Rather than tell them, I had them write it down and then told them to look it up in the dictionary. Perhaps I should have told them to Google it, but the subject of the day was books, not computers!

I was able to read them three books. The first was called “Horn for Louis,” and it was about legendary jazz trumpet player Louis Armstrong. In the book, young Louis, who hung around dance halls so he could listen to jazz, pines for a cornet hanging in a pawnshop window. He dreams of nothing more in life than to play that cornet.

Louis scrimps and saves to raise the $5 he needs to buy it, but just when he’s finally earned the money, his mother comes to him looking for some of it so she can give his sister a proper birthday party. Crushed, and almost certain he’ll never get that cornet, he gives his mother the money she needs.

In return, she gives him enough money to buy the cornet.

What was nice about reading this story to the kids in the class is that quite a few of them knew that Louis Armstrong sang the ever-popular “What a Wonderful World,” which means that could relate to the story a lot better.

I think it also resonated with them that I told them I was old enough to remember seeing Louis Armstrong on TV.

Haitian flag raised outside City Hall

Next, we tackled the moon landing in “The Moon over Star.” A little girl on a farm pretends she and her cousins are the ones speeding toward the moon in July 1969, and then watches the landing on TV with interest while her cynical, hardened grandfather scoffs at the notion of a space program in a time when so many people on this planet are needy.

But when she tells him she, too, wants to be an astronaut, he switches gears and tells her that it would really be a great honor to the family if she could achieve that dream.

Finally, it was time to learn about Ted Williams and the year he hit .406.

The book went into great detail about how Williams was his own taskmaster when it came to practicing hitting. He wanted to be known as the greatest hitter who ever lived, and knew hard work was the only way that was going to happen.

But the crux of the book is that going into the doubleheader on the last day of the season against the Philadelphia Athletics, Williams’ average stood at .39955. He could have sat out and technically been recognized as a .400 hitter (a little math exercise in the midst of all the reading).

Williams wanted none of that. He played the games, went 6-for-8, and ended up with his .406 average.

It was probably not intentional on the part of Carole Shutzer, the wonderful Harrington librarian who organizes this day, to have the three books present a unified theme. But they did. All three speak to dreams and how important they are to children; and of how important it is to work hard to achieve your dream. And in the case of the Armstrong book, there was the added attraction of being faced with a real difficult choice, and despite every inclination to make the wrong one, Louis made the right one.

There is always a large contingent of city officials who take part in “Harrington Reads” day, including Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy, Sen. Thomas McGee, Reps. Brendan Crighton and Dan Cahill, City Councilor Brian LaPierre, Joe Gill of Cahill’s staff and North Shore Navigators, funeral director David J. Solimine, Item CEO Beth Bresnahan, Taso Nikolakopoulos of John’s Roast Beef, District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett, former Lynn mayor Thomas Costin, Drew Russo of the Lynn Museum, Lynn attorney Charlie Gallo and Lynn Teachers Union official Brant Duncan.

Fox Channel 25 reporter Kerry Kavanaugh read to an assembly of children, and reinforced the theme — accidental or not — that it’s important to have dreams, to go after them, and, especially in her case, embrace all assignments even if it means moving around (a Medford native, she’s been in Montana, Iowa, Florida and Atlanta before coming to Boston).  

Best of all from my perspective, my son Andrew is a Boy Scout troop leader in Lynn, and Eagle Scout, and someone Carole Shutzer felt was worthy of joining us. So along with everything else, it was a father-son bonding experience. Not to mention the perfect way of giving back to all the people who made our lives what they are.


Steve Krause can be reached at skrause@itemlive.com.

Haitian flag raised outside City Hall

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
The Haitian flag flies at Lynn City Hall.

By MATT DEMIRS

Spenser Hasak

Lynn Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy addresses the crowd.

LYNN The red and blue Haitian flag soared at City Hall on Friday as Haitians celebrated Flag Day.

About 100 people marched through the Lynn Commons onto the gazebo, where the flag was hung and festivities continued, including music and feasting on a variety of homemade foods.

“We will never be ashamed of being Haitian,” said Fré William, pastor at St. Mary’s Chapel in his opening prayer.

William Joseph, executive director of the Senior Action Center and organizer of the celebration, spoke of Lynn’s support for the Haitian community.

“We are a group of very active people who take part in the development of Lynn and enjoy the community,” he said. “I can see and feel the progress in Lynn.”

Joseph, who has lived in the city for 17 years, said Lynn residents stepped up when Haiti suffered a catastrophic earthquake in 2010 which killed more than 200,000 people.

“Lynn did everything to help Haiti, from medical supplies to wheelchairs and money, a $251,000 value,” he said.

Joseph thanked Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy for providing much needed assistance to his people during a difficult time.

“We are proud to be under your leadership,” he said. “Mayor Kennedy is one of Haiti’s best friends.”

Haitians from every generation attended the celebration.

Sagine St. Paulin came with members of St. Mary’s Church. The 20-year-old said Haitian Flag Day strengthens the Haitian presence in the city.

Spenser Hasak

Kimberly Felix, left, and Astrid Walsh attend the ceremony.

“Lynn carries a large Haitian community although we are not really connected,” she said. “This holiday brings the different groups together to celebrate our background.”

Ann Romelus, 14, told the crowd of the history of the Haitian flag, which has undergone numerous changes in the past 200 years that reflect the country’s social and political divide. Adopted in 1986, the two colors on the flag symbolize the unity of black and mulatto Haitians. The blue stripe is dedicated to black Haitians while mulatto Haitians are represented by the red stripe.

Ginette Louis was born in Haiti and became a U.S. citizen in the 1980s and has come to the celebration every year.

“Ever since I was a young girl, Flag Day has always been my favorite holiday,” she said

Three Haitian students from the Lynn English High School’s Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps joined the procession and helped raise the flag at City Hall.

Vanessa Volny, a Lynn English senior, said she was happy to celebrate with her people, far away from her country.

“In Haiti, everybody goes where the flag is,” she said. “It is nice to be able to join together and do that here.”


Matt Demirs can be reached at mdemirs@itemlive.com.

Lynn teacher joins the march

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN Miriam Rodriguez-Fusco is one of hundreds of teachers planning to attend the Rally for Public Education Saturday at the Boston Common.

The speech and language therapist in the Lynn Public Schools and parent of a third-grader at the Aborn Elementary School plans to board a bus in Lynn for the trip into Boston.

Rodriguez-Fusco, an educator for nearly two decades, said she feels strongly about her son’s future and the challenges of public school funding as traditional schools compete with charter schools for limited cash.

“We must raise our voices so that we can stand up to Trump and tell him we need adequate funding for public education that is free and not privatized,” she said.

The protest is sponsored by the Massachusetts Teachers Association (MTA) and the Massachusetts Education Justice Alliance, a grassroots organization of students, parents, educators, and concerned community members who are dedicated to preserving public education.

Entertainment, education at ‘Harrington Reads’

The Alliance said since Donald Trump was elected president, they have been standing up for women, immigrants, science and now they’ve turned their attention to public schools.

Protesters plan to meet on the Common at 2 p.m. and later march to the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center on Boylston Street where delegates from MTA’s Annual Meeting are meeting.

On the recent vote to defeat funding for a pair of middle schools in Lynn, Rodriguez-Fusco said she was disappointed.

“No one wants to pay more taxes,” she said. “But we’re talking about the children who are our future and we have to invest in them or we will never have better.”   


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.