Lynn

City plays Quincy in Manchester film

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
Pablo DeLeon, who lives at 34 Broad St. in Lynn, stands near the spot behind the building where actor Casey Affleck shoveled snow.

By BILL BROTHERTON

LYNN — “Manchester by the Sea” is up for six Oscars at tomorrow night’s 89th Academy Awards ceremony in Hollywood. But a downtown apartment building deserves a best supporting role nod for helping to add authenticity to the critically acclaimed film.

The 36-unit brick apartment building at 34 Broad St. is featured in early scenes featuring best actor nominee Casey Affleck. Lynn is a stand-in for Quincy, where Affleck’s glum, troubled, guilt-wracked janitor lives. An oft-shown snow-shoveling scene was shot near the back basement steps of the Broad Street building. The tenants had to move their cars to a nearby city lot, and got valet transportation back to their homes.

Pablo DeLeon is the building superintendent at 34 Broad St. His apartment, 1A, was used by director/screenwriter Kenneth Lonergan in pivotal early scenes. A second apartment, 7A, was vacant at the time and served as Affleck’s dressing room. “It also was where they put our bird, a parakeet, when they were shooting scenes in our apartment,” said DeLeon.

DeLeon said filming took place in his kitchen (Affleck’s character changed a lightbulb) and living room for about four hours one day in March 2015. He has lived here for 23 years. “The pizza they served was five-star,” added DeLeon’s teenage son, McThaniel. The filmmakers were at the Broad Street site for three days, with their big trucks occupying lots of space on the street and causing traffic issues.

“He (Affleck) was very nice,” said DeLeon.

Paul Amirault, the chief operating officer for the Hall Company, which manages the three-story, 1930 apartment building, worked with location manager Kai Quinlan and toured buildings with director Lonergan. “The director and Casey both paid real attention to details,” said Amirault. “They even looked at how many keys Pablo has on his belt.”

Amirault said one Saturday morning he accompanied Lonergan, Quinlan, Affleck and a film crew to the site to reshoot a scene. “Casey was great, and he had good interactions with tenants. It was pretty damn fun to have them there.”

One resident of the building, who declined to give her name, said the only time Affleck got a little testy was when someone said, ‘Oh. you’re Ben’s brother.’”

Amirault, who says he’s not much of a moviegoer, has not seen “Manchester by the Sea.” “There was a free screening of the movie, but I couldn’t make it. My son was playing in a hockey tournament. I was very happy to see him play; I’ll see this eventually.”

This is not the first time Amirault has helped when Hollywood came calling. The makers of “Surrogates,” a critically-panned 2009 film starring Bruce Willis, also looked at some Hall Company properties.

“When Hollywood comes to Lynn, it is fun and interesting,” added AmirCitault. “We’re always happy to help. There is compensation for the use of our buildings, but we insist it goes to our tenants. They are the ones whose lives are being disrupted.”

Now’s your chance to be a Patriots cheerlader

Eagle-eyed moviegoers noticed other area locales: Affleck’s character is seen driving on Humphrey Street in Swampscott and exterior scenes were shot on Lewis Street near the Tedeschi Food Shop. Route 128, Beverly, Gloucester, Essex and, of course, Manchester-by-the-Sea also play prominent roles.

“Manchester by the Sea” received six nominations: best picture, best director (Lonergan), best actor (Affleck), best supporting actor (Lucas Hedges), best supporting actress (Michelle Williams) and best original screenplay (Lonergan)

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will honor the best films of 2016 at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood tomorrow night. ABC will air the program.

Dominican pride flies high in Lynn

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
Frances Martinez leads the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance at Lynn City Hall.

LYNN — The Dominican Republic’s Independence Day isn’t until Monday, but that didn’t stop an early celebration in the city Friday.

More than 100 people, including Dominican natives, their families and officials packed the City Hall lobby to hear rousing speeches, enjoy dances by the Cultura Latina Dance Academy and see the raising of the Latin American country’s red, white and blue flag on City Hall Square.

Perhaps the biggest applause was reserved for Maria Carrasco, a member of the School Committee who immigrated to the U.S. from the Dominican Republic in 1982. She was introduced by Frances Martinez, president and CEO of the North Shore Latino Business Association, as “one of our own.”

“This means so much to us because we are free, we can rise and we are proud,” Carrasco said. ”We were able to fight for what we believe, but at the same time we are united, we don’t look to to the past, we just look ahead.”

On Feb. 27, 1844, independence was declared from Haiti, the culmination of a movement led by Juan Pablo Duarte, then in exile, the hero of Dominican independence, and one of its founding fathers, according to welcome-dominican-republic.com.

Martinez, who is also a member of the Dominican Flag Committee, said while she was born in the U.S., she is proud of her parents’ country and culture.   

“This celebration is very important to us,” she said. “As a member of the first generation in the U.S. from the Dominican Republic, I want my children and my grandchildren to understand that just because we are here in the U.S. we cannot forget our backgrounds.”

Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy spoke to the crowd in Spanish, which brought cheers.

“I welcome everyone and thank you for attending the flag raising ceremony,” she said. “I wish you a happy Independence Day. Long live the Dominican Republic.”

State Sen. Thomas McGee (D-Lynn) hailed the crowd and congratulated them.

“The Dominican community is a strong and vibrant part of the city of Lynn,” he said. “I’m glad to be here with all of you to celebrate your Independence Day.”  

Jose Manuel Encarnacion capped off the hour-long event when he said “Keep that fire in your heart for Dominican independence.”

Former Lynn Item building up for auction


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Jolene Kelly leaves LynnArts

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
Jolene Kelly accepts praise from Lynn Museum Director Drew Russo at her goodbye party.

By STEVE KRAUSE

LYNN — Jolene Kelly only worked as operations manager for LynnArts for three years. But judging from the response from people who stopped by the Exchange Street building to say their goodbyes, she touched a lot of lives positively.

Kelly will be leaving next month to go to Wyoming, where her husband, Ken Coder, will be working at Laramie County Community College. Her departure will leave a tremendous void, friends and co-workers say.

“Aside from the absolute dedication to everything that went on at LynnArts, Jolene is the sparkle of the downtown area,” said Drew Russo, director of the Lynn Museum, which encompasses LynnArts. “She was such a vital part of the downtown community, and she added so much to it.”

Though Kelly worked officially for LynnArts, she was known just as much for what she did outside the building — such as walking dogs, getting to know people from all walks of life (including some of the homeless people in the downtown area), and, last month, helping to organize a clothing drive after a large apartment building on West Baltimore Street.

“The downtown area is in every fiber of her being,” said Russo. “Sometimes, it amazes me that she didn’t grow up in Lynn because she seems to be such a large part of it.”

For her part, Kelly, who did everything from supervising building maintenance to planning and scheduling exhibits, isn’t one to take credit.

“I like to think I do what needs to be done,” she said after accepting citations from Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy, Lynn City Councilor Brian LaPierre and State Rep. Brendan Crighton.

She’s a firm believer that nothing gets done without lots of help. For example, she says she’s indebted to Joe Scanlon and Steve Babbitt of the Lynn Museum and the Friends of Lynn Woods for their help during the winter of 2015.

“So many things went wrong with the building,” she said. “And they were invaluable.”

Kelly has lived in many places, “but Lynn is one of the few places that I really consider home,” she said.

City plays Quincy in Manchester film

Annette Sykes, chairwoman of the Curatorial Committee at the museum, worked closely with Kelly and called her “a very inviting person who creates a true sense of community. She brings people together, and that’s a true gift.”

And Yetti Frankel, a longtime artist in residence at LynnArts, said Kelly was “a character in her own way, and she really cares about the people in the building.”

Haley Sullivan will serve as interim operations director when Kelly leaves.


Steve Krause can be reached at skrause@itemlive.com.

Former Lynn Item building up for auction

ITEM FILE PHOTO
The former Daily Item building is pictured in this file photo.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN Months after a global real estate company tried to sell the former Daily Item building without success, the property is up for auction.

CBRE/New England has scheduled an online sale for the five-story downtown building on March 27. The starting bid is $300,000.

This is the second time in two years that the 35,000-square-foot property has been on the auction block.

US-1 Ventures bought the flatiron-style building at auction in 2015 for $880,000 with plans to invest $12 million to transform the property into 24 luxury apartments with ground floor commercial space. The property is assessed at $835,600, according to city records.

But last fall, after the Winchester-based firm was unable to secure a tenant for the 5,000-square-foot first floor space, they abandoned the project and listed the property with CBRE for $1.5 million. Today, the landmark building remains unsold.

“Built in 1900, this iconic flatiron-styled structure served as the headquarters for The Daily Item, housing the newspaper’s printing production, executive suites, sales and operations,” according to the listing sheet. “Today the building is vacant and offers investors, owners and developers a myriad of exciting restoration, adaptive reuse and development options. Located across the street from the MBTA Commuter Rail’s Central Square Station, the property presents tremendous transit-oriented redevelopment potential.”

Ten-X, a California-based online auction house, is conducting the transaction. The seller has an undisclosed reserve price and the transaction fee is 5 percent of the winning bid with a minimum of $40,000.

Christine Diarbakerly, founder of US-1 Ventures, did not return a call seeking comment.

Taidgh McClory, a CBRE managing director, said the firm ran a marketing campaign last fall that generated multiple offers of in excess of $1 million.

“Based on that activity, we decided to launch the auction and our expectation is that it will net increased interest and higher offers,” he said.

Joseph Mulligan, a fellow at MassDevelopment, the state’s economic development and finance agency, who has been working to improve Lynn’s downtown, said it appears the owners were unable to achieve their desired sale price and are pursuing an auction strategy.

“We look forward to working with whomever might be interested in buying the property and repurposing it,” he said.

Finding left from right on the streets of Lynn


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Police log: 2-25-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Khalil Johnson, 27, of 205 Pratt Ave., Lowell, was arrested for shoplifting and resisting arrest on Friday at 2:05 p.m.

Kendrick Bellamy, 41, of 21 Kerwin St., Boston, was arrested for larceny from a building, breaking and entering, possessing  a burglary instrument, destruction of property and possession of a Class E substance at 3:30 p.m. Thursday.

Victoria Badjie, 38, of 188 Washington St., was arrested on a charge of protective custody at 2:31 p.m. Thursday.

Raymond Bryant, 63, was arrested for trespass at 4:27 p.m. Thursday.

Albert Burns, of 11 Dudley St., Saugus was arrested for shoplifting at 3:21 p.m. Thursday.

Kelly McNeil, 31, of 10 Greene St., North Reading, was arrested for larceny from a building, breaking and entering, possessing  a burglary instrument and a knife with a blade at 3:33 a.m. Thursday.

Brian Neenan of 124 Central St.was arrested on a warrant charge for operating a vehicle with a revoked license and two counts of distributing a Class A and B substances at 12:39 p.m. Friday.

John O’Neal, 66, of 69 North Common St., was arrested on a warrant charge for a parole violation on Thursday at 6:23 p.m.

Lurina Rivera of 32 Range Ave. was arrested on a warrant charge of using a motor vehicle without permission, larceny from a building and motor vehicle larceny on Friday at 10:24 a.m.

Donald Ross, 48, was arrested for trespassing on Thursday at 1:02 p.m.

William Tirrell of 100 Willow St., was arrested on Thursday at 9:15 p.m. for driving with a suspended license.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 11:51 a.m. Thursday at Broad Street; at 12:05 p.m. Thursday at Green and Union streets.; at 12:51 p.m. Thursday at Essex Street and Rogers Avenue; at 12:59 p.m. Thursday at Brightwood Terrace and Essex Street; at 1:15 p.m. Thursday Franklin and Laighton streets; at 2:36 p.m. Thursday at Pleasant and State streets; at 3:12 a.m. Friday at 678 Walnut St.; at 6:44 a.m. Friday at Essex Avenue and Essex Street Street.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering of a motor vehicle at 3:23 a.m. Thursday at 325 Broad St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 12:56 a.m. Friday at Planet Fitness at 50 Boston St.; Friday at 12:58 a.m. Friday at Chestnut and Union streets; Friday at 678 Walnut St. at 3:12 a.m. Friday at City Hall at 3 City Hall Square at 11:14 a.m.; at 1:11 p.m. Friday at Essex Circle.

Police log: 2-24-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Arrests

Abdou K. Sene, 21, of 15 Hines Court, Apt. 10, was arrested on a warrant at 10:09 p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 1:07 a.m. Thursday at Tedesco and Maple streets.

Complaints

A report of loud music that had been going on for an hour at 5:05 a.m. Friday on Washington Street. Officer reported an all clear and everything appears quiet.


PEABODY

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 6:21 p.m. Thursday at the Salem Country Club at 133 Forest St.; at 6:13 p.m. Thursday at 102 Tremont St.; a hit and run at 7:15 p.m. Thursday at 67 Lynnfield St.; at 12:26 a.m. Friday at Newbury Street.

Well Being Check

North Shore Elder Services requested well being check for a man who has dementia and a history of falls on Thursday at 10:16 a.m. police checked home and found female was sleeping.

A 911 call to police at 10:54 a.m. Thursday from an insurance company representative who said a customer told them he was planning to kill himself. Officer spoke to man and he was taken to Salem Hospital for evaluation. Home checked for firearms.


REVERE

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 5 p.m. Thursday at Big Lots on the VFW Parkway; at 7:12 p.m. Thursday on Sargent Street. Hit and run on Thursday at 9:35 p.m. on Walnut Avenue.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 1:52 a.m. Wednesday on Broadway.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 11:04 p.m. Thursday at Global Oil on Lee Burbank Highway; at 2:47 p.m. Thursday on Irving Street; at 6:50 p.m. Thursday on Winthrop Avenue.


SAUGUS

Complaints

A caller reported traffic lights not working at the intersection of Lincoln Avenue and Ballard Street at 11:35 a.m. Friday. Department of Public Works notified.

Suspicious Activity

Caller reported she heard noises outside her home and saw footprints at 12:30 p.m. Friday at 40 Clifton Ave. Officer reported footprints appear to be old and there was no sign of forced entry.

Credit Card Fraud

A woman came to the station Friday at 12:51 p.m. to report fraudulent charges on her credit card totaling $700. Filed report.

Joseph C. Esdra, 86

SAUGUS — Joseph C. Esdra, 86, of Saugus, died Friday, Feb. 24, 2017 at his home, surrounded by his loving family.

Born in Cambridge to the late Carl and Rose (Croci) Esdra, Joseph grew up in Somerville and spent his later years living in Saugus. He proudly served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean Conflict, and then he owned and operated Techno Tax in Lynn, along with his son Joe Jr.

Joseph is survived by his wife, Barbara (Schaejbe) Esdra; children, Kenneth Esdra, Joseph Esdra Jr., Paul Esdra and his wife Julie; grandchildren, Nicole, Anthony and Chelsey Esdra, great grandson, Luca Esdra; his stepchildren, Robert Deegan and his partner Carole Deyesso, Susan Deegan, Shawn Deegan and his partner Laura Chappell, Douglas Deegan and his wife MaryLou, Kelley Deegan-Conroy, Brian Deegan and his wife Jennifer, nieces and nephews Robert Schaejbe and his wife Diane, Carl Schaejbe, Thomas Schaejbe and his wife Karen, and Roseanne Schaejbe, as well as many grand nieces and nephews. He also leaves his good friend and caregiver, Alton Alexander. He was predeceased by his wife Marguerite (L’Heureux) Esdra and his son Michael Esdra.

Service information: Joseph’s funeral will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 9:30 a.m. from the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 67 Ocean St. (Route 1A), Lynn, followed by a funeral Mass at 10:30 at Blessed Sacrament Church, Saugus. Burial will follow in St. Joseph Cemetery, Lynn. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. Visiting hours will be Monday, Feb. 27 from 4-8 p.m. For directions and guestbook please visit www.Solimine.com.

 

Lynn teen says he was attacked by 3

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN A 13-year-old boy from Lynn told police he was assaulted and robbed by three males Wednesday night on North Common Street.

Lynn Police responded to a children’s hospital in Salem to speak with the teenager, who told officers he had been assaulted in the area of the Commons, and had scratches, bruises and swelling to his head and face, Lynn Police Lt. Rick Donnelly said.

Donnelly said the alleged assault happened at approximately 8 p.m., when the boy was visiting a friend’s house on North Common Street. The boy told police three males between 16-20 years old jumped him from behind, and began punching him.

The assailants, who were wearing all black clothing and had bandanas on their faces, allegedly threw him to the ground, where they punched and kicked him several times, Donnelly said.

The boy had his phone stolen, but didn’t see what direction the assailants fled to, Donnelly said.

The incident is under investigation.

Police log: 2-24-2017


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley

 

Lynn seeks middle ground on school project

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — The city said they have found a way to end the fighting over construction of a controversial middle school proposed near Pine Grove Cemetery, but opponents are standing firm.

Last week, the City Council asked the law department to prepare documents that would convey portions of the city-owned 40-acre site to the Pine Grove Cemetery Commision. Under the plan, the commission could use land not needed for the new school to expand the graveyard. The move was made to assuage school opponents who have insisted that the land was reserved for a graveyard. They have threatened court action if the school is approved.

“This should end all debate and any discussion of a taxpayer lawsuit,” said James Lamanna, city attorney.

But Protect Our Reservoir – Preserve Pine Grove, a grassroots organization founded to fight the school site, said it is not willing to compromise.  

At issue is a controversial proposal for a pair of schools that would serve students in the Pickering Middle School district. Proponents say the new schools are needed to accommodate a growing school population.

Swampscott school race draws contenders

In a special election on March 14, voters will be asked to pay for a 652-student school to be built near the cemetery and Breeds Pond Reservoir off Parkland Avenue. A second facility to serve 1,008 students would be constructed on McManus Field on Commercial Street. Plans for the second school have no opposition.

If approved, homeowners would pay an estimated $75 million, or an average of $200 annually for the next 25 years on their real estate tax bills.

Lamanna said as many as 17 acres are needed for the new school. The rest, with the exception of four acres of wetlands, could be used to expand the cemetery, he said. The commission will consider the proposal on March 7.

One of the problems of enlarging the cemetery has been a $1 million project needed to build a new road and a bridge over wetlands to access the parcel, Lamanna said. While the commission lacks the funds to complete the project, the infrastructure would be built as part of the school project with most of the cost being reimbursed by the state.  

But the location of the proposed school, on what opponents insist has been designated by the city as cemetery land, has stirred debate. Opponents have argued that the Parkland Avenue property was intended for cemetery use, citing a city document from 1893.

On Saturday, they will plan to hold a fundraiser at Hibernian Hall on Federal Street to fight the proposal.

Donald Castle, one of the organizers of Protect Our Reservoir – Preserve Pine Grove, said they are not opposed to a new school, but to the site. He said the city’s latest plan to divide the parcel is wrong.

“It’s been cemetery land for 127 years and its wetlands with protected species,” he said. “It’s an inappropriate site.”


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

9th apparent fatal OD in ‘record-setting’ month

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN Police responded to two fatal apparent opioid overdoses this week, including one on Thursday, which marks the ninth in the city in February.

Both deaths are being classified by police as apparent heroin overdoses.

There have been 31 overdoses this month, as of late Thursday afternoon, according to Lynn Police Lt. Rick Donnelly.

In January, the city had 26 overdoses and two of those were fatal. In a five-day span from Feb. 3-7, there were five fatal apparent heroin overdoses in the city.

Police responded to Mudge Street on Thursday at approximately 5:30 a.m., and found a 34-year-old woman who wasn’t breathing. An ambulance was called, and the woman was brought the hospital, where she was pronounced dead, Donnelly said.

On Monday, at approximately 6:30 a.m., police found a 34-year-old woman who wasn’t breathing in the middle of the street on Melville Place, Donnelly said.

Donnelly said the woman was a known drug user and it was apparent that she had been down for quite some time. The medical examiner’s office was called, and the body was picked up and brought to Boston.

“I think since we started tracking them, this is a record-setting month,” Donnelly said of the fatal apparent overdoses. “Before we saw heroin overdose deaths were going down when we started using Narcan (the life-saving overdose drug). Now, it seems that there’s more potent drugs out there and we’re getting there too late.

“When we started using the Narcan, we didn’t see a decline in overdoses, but we did see a decline in overdose deaths,” he continued. “Now, this month, the deaths are increasing. Common sense would tell you there’s stronger heroin out there and it could be fentanyl that’s attributed to why there’s so many deaths this month.”

Lynn Police Sgt. Rick Carrow, of the Drug Task Force, said in a previous interview that he’s seeing more overdoses with straight fentanyl, which is 100 times stronger than the heroin seen on the streets.

Healthy Streets ready to help


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley

Police log: 2-24-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Kendrick Bellamy, 41, of 21 Kerwin St., Boston, was arrested and charged with larceny from building, breaking and entering nighttime for a felony, possession of a burglarious instrument, destruction of property and Class E drug possession at 3:30 a.m. Thursday.

Dylan Flanagan, 24, of 6 Wilson Terrace, was arrested and charged with parole/probation violation at 2:22 p.m. Thursday.

Georgios Keskinidis was arrested on a warrant charge of larceny at 2:25 p.m. Wednesday.

Kelly McNeil, 30, of 10 Greene St., North Reading, was arrested and charged with breaking and entering nighttime for a felony, larceny from building, destruction of property, possession of a burglarious instrument and possession of a knife with a blade over 2 and a half inches at 3:33 a.m. Thursday.

Emily Sheehan, 25, of 9 Bearhill Road, Merrimack, was arrested on warrant charges of juror failure to attend, negligent operation of a motor vehicle, marked lanes violation and OUI liquor at 4:20 p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:11 p.m. Wednesday at B Street and Parkland Avenue; at 2:54 p.m. Wednesday at 258 Parkland Ave.; at 3:28 p.m. Wednesday at 6 Western Ave.; at 7:27 p.m. Wednesday at Boston Street and Rhodes Avenue; at 8:32 p.m. Wednesday at 400 Broadway; at 11:51 a.m. Thursday on Broad Street; at 12:05 p.m. Thursday at Green and Union streets; at 12:51 p.m. Thursday at Essex Street and Rogers Avenue; at 1:20 p.m. Thursday at Franklin and Laighton streets.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 3:48 p.m. Wednesday at 406 Western Ave.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 12:59 p.m. Thursday at St. Stephen’s Church at 74 South Common St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 10:47 p.m. Wednesday at 29 North Common St.

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 3:23 a.m. Thursday at 325 Broad St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 3:27 p.m. Wednesday at 19 Essex Circle; at 4:21 p.m. Wednesday at 19 Forest St.; at 4:42 p.m. Wednesday on Brightwood Terrace; at 4:52 p.m. Wednesday at 377 Essex St.; at 6:32 p.m. Wednesday at 147 Franklin St.; at 9:30 p.m. Wednesday at Public Library at 5 North Common St.; at 11:36 p.m. Wednesday at 330 Essex St.; at 12:15 a.m. Thursday on Quincy Terrace; at 1:54 a.m. Thursday at 2 Williams Place; at 2:29 a.m. Thursday at 454 Essex St.; at 3:06 a.m. Thursday at 16 Flint St.; at 9:11 a.m. Thursday at 2 Brightwood Terrace.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 7:48 p.m. Wednesday on Boston Street; at 8:18 p.m. Wednesday on Chatham Street; at 5:19 a.m. Thursday on Mudge Street.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 3:23 p.m. Wednesday at Lynn City Hall at 3 City Hall Square; at 10:40 p.m. Wednesday at 170 Union St.; at 1:11 p.m. Thursday at 8 Silsbee St.

A report of a robbery at 9:40 p.m. Wednesday on North Common Street.

A report of motor vehicle theft at 1:23 p.m. Thursday at 271 Chatham St.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 10:48 p.m. Wednesday at Goldfish Pond at 0 Lafayette Park; at 10:09 a.m. Thursday at 81 Empire St.

Police log: 2-23-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Arrests

Abdou K. Sene, 21, of 15 Hines Court, Apt. 10, was arrested on a warrant at 10:09 p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 1:07 a.m. Thursday at Tedesco and Maple streets.

Complaints

A report of someone posing as a firefighter at 11:50 a.m. Wednesday on Anderson Street. The fire chief called in saying he was alerted to someone posing as a firefighter in an effort to solicit a donation.


PEABODY

Arrests

David E. Garcia, 46, of 390 Lowell St., was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 7:14 p.m. Wednesday.

Laurie J. McCullock, 40, of 401 Essex St., Apt. 222, Beverly, was arrested and charged with receiving stolen property, shoplifting by concealing merchandise and possession of a burglarious instrument at 7:14 p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 3:57 p.m. Wednesday on Centennial Drive; at 4:36 p.m. Wednesday at 221 Andover St.; at 7:43 p.m. Wednesday at Domino’s Pizza at 1 Andover St.; at 7:47 a.m. Thursday at 220 Lowell St. and 2 Forest St.; at 12:55 p.m. Thursday at U.S. Post Office at 4 Essex Center Drive.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 9:35 a.m. Thursday at Dunkin’ Donuts at 527 Lowell St.

Complaints

A report of gunshots at 6:50 p.m. Wednesday on Scribner Road. Ten gunshots were reported. Police reported the call was unfounded.

A report of a disturbance at 8:43 a.m. Thursday on McIntire Court; at 1:08 p.m. Thursday at Wendy’s at 71 Newbury St.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 6:28 p.m. Wednesday on Foster Street. The person was taken to Salem Hospital.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 2:36 p.m. Wednesday at Walgreens at 35 Main St. A stolen bike was reported, worth about $300.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 10:02 a.m. Thursday at 111 Main St. A caller reported damage to a vehicle during neighbors moving.


REVERE

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 5:48 p.m. Wednesday at Speedway on Lee Burbank Highway; at 8:48 p.m. Wednesday at Dairy Mart on Squire Road.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 1:52 a.m. Wednesday on Broadway.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 11:19 a.m. Wednesday at Rumney Flats on Ward Street; at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday on Crescent Avenue; at 4:41 p.m. Wednesday at Hill Park on Park Avenue; at 6:13 p.m. Wednesday on Squire Road; at 7:50 p.m. Wednesday at Flaming Grill Buffet on Furlong Drive; at 9:05 p.m. Wednesday at Revere Housing Authority on Constitution Avenue; at 10:32 p.m. Wednesday at Revere Housing Authority on Nahant Avenue.

A report of shots fired at 9:38 pm. Wednesday on Cooledge Street.

Theft

A report of larceny of a wallet at 1:25 p.m. Wednesday at Burlington Coat Factory on Squire Road.

A report of auto theft at 1:34 p.m. Wednesday on Central Avenue; at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday on Shirley Avenue.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 12:33 a.m. Wednesday at Domino’s Pizza on Broadway.


SAUGUS

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 10:51 a.m. Wednesday at York Ford at 1481 Broadway.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:25 p.m. Wednesday at Lynn Fells Parkway and Falmouth Street; at 5:06 p.m. Wednesday at Jimmy’s Steer House at 114 Broadway.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 9:35 p.m. Wednesday on Bow Street. One person was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 8:58 p.m. Wednesday at 8 Wickford St.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 2:48 p.m. Wednesday at Speedway at 220 Broadway. A theft of about $25 was reported.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 4:19 p.m. Wednesday at 27 Spring St.


SWAMPSCOTT

Accidents

A report of an accident at 3:16 p.m. Wednesday at 88 Cherry St.

Threes lift Endicott over Eastern Nazarene

PHOTO BY BOB ROCHE
Lynn native Stephen Basden and the Endicott Gulls rolled past Eastern Nazarene, 84-66, on Thursday night. 

By HAROLD RIVERA

BEVERLY — The Eastern Nazarene men’s basketball team gave Endicott everything it could handle for 15 minutes. But when the Gulls knock in their three-pointers, they’re a tough team to beat.

The second-seeded Gulls swished 13 threes en route to an 84-66 win over sixth-seeded Eastern Nazarene in Thursday night’s Commonwealth Coast Conference semifinal game at Endicott’s MacDonald Gymnasium.

Endicott head coach Kevin Bettencourt, a Peabody native who recently earned the CCC’s Coach of the Year award, was pleased with his team’s success from beyond the arc.

“That’s something we’ve been pretty successful with all season,” Bettencourt said. “We have a lot of shooters that can really spread the floor. There’s some games that different guys can get it going and tonight was no different.”

Daquan Sampson led the Gulls with a game-high 24 points, shooting five of six from beyond the arc in the process. Kamahl Walker finished with 16 points and five assists, while Max Motroni contributed with 15 points. Lynn native Stephen Basden grabbed five rebounds and dished out two assists for the Gulls. Basden’s strong play off the glass helped Endicott out-rebound the Lions, 41-28.

Eastern Nazarene held the lead in the early goings of the game, but a pair of threes knocked in by Danvers native Vinny Clifford put Endicott ahead, 17-15. With 2:40 to play in the first half, Nick Thebeault powered his way to a bucket in the paint and drew a foul. Thebeault drained his free throw and the Gulls led by six, 36-30.

Endicott ended the half on a 7-4 run and held a 43-34 advantage at halftime.

“I thought it was a little sluggish early on,” Bettencourt said. “We were all a little bit emotional. I thought we made some plays on defense, got some one-ups in transition. Daquan made some threes in the second half and that kind of settled us down.”

In the second half, Sampson flashed his talents from long-range to open Endicott’s lead. The senior forward swished four three-pointers in a row to start the period, the final one giving the Gulls a comfortable 55-40 lead with 14:30 to play.

With Endicott running away with the game, the Lions were forced to play catch-up for the remainder of the second half. Eastern Nazarene was able to slim the deficit down to 12 points with seven minutes remaining, but it wasn’t enough and the Gulls rolled to the win.

“I thought it was a great win,” Bettencourt said. “Any win in the playoffs, do-or-die situation, is a great win.”

For the Lions, Christian Lynch led the way with 17 points and Josh Rice added 15.

With the win the Gulls advance to the CCC Championship game on Saturday, when they’ll visit top-seed Nichols. The Nichols Bisons are led by another local talent in Lynn’s Marcos Echevarria, who was named CCC Player of the Year earlier this week.

“Marcos is a phenomenal player,” Bettencourt said. “It’ll be a challenge, especially on the road, but we’re looking forward to the opportunity. Just to be playing, doesn’t matter if it’s home or away, we’re happy to be there and we’ll see what happens.”

Tipoff for Saturday’s game is scheduled for noon.

Aside from Bettencourt and Basden, Thursday’s game featured another local in Nahant’s Jake Canty who wrapped up his first season as an assistant coach at Eastern Nazarene.

Morrison: Lynn teams ready to make noise in tourney

FILE PHOTO
Temi Falayi has been a staple to St. Mary’s success on the court this season. 

By KATIE MORRISON

It’s been a banner year for basketball in Lynn.

For the first time since 2011, seven of Lynn’s eight basketball teams made the tournament: the boys teams from all four schools, and the girls teams from Classical, St. Mary’s and Tech.

What’s even better is the fact that Lynn teams could do some serious damage in the tournament. Seedings for all divisions come out today, but even without knowing exactly where each team will wind up, it’s pretty clear which teams are going to make some noise.

First, there’s the obvious choice: St. Mary’s boys. How could you not like the defending Division 4 state champions in this year’s tournament? The Spartans are a strong, unselfish team, and all five starters are scoring threats, it just depends on who has the hot hand. Stephen Fama just had a couple big games in the Spartan Classic and killed both Greater Lawrence and Salem in the paint, using his size to get quite a few put-backs. Jalen Echevarria is dangerous from the perimeter and in the paint, and Jonny Mercado runs a tight ship on offense.

St. Mary’s played a tough schedule this season, taking on teams like St. John’s Prep, Cathedral and New Mission, as well as a rematch with fellow Division 4 state finalist Maynard, making them pretty battle-tested.

Then there’s the Classical boys. I bet the Rams wish there wasn’t so much time in between their final regular season contest and the start of the tournament, because if you believe in momentum, Classical should be riding high after toppling Marblehead, which was undefeated in the Northeastern Conference until last Friday’s game. There have been short stretches during the season when Classical slumped and didn’t play up to its abilities, but when the Rams are on, they’re nearly unstoppable. Classical gets it done with speed; it’s a team of almost entirely guards, save for big man Edwin Solis, who still has the ball-handling skills of a guard. I wondered if Marblehead’s double-headed attack of big men Derek Marino and Bo Millett might give the Rams trouble, but Classical handled anything the Magicians threw their way.

For the girls, St. Mary’s is the team I would put money on to make a deep run. The Spartans have a lot of tournament experience under their belts. Last year, St. Mary’s couldn’t get past rival Bishop Fenwick, which went on to win the Division 3 state title. This time around, the Crusaders don’t give St. Mary’s the same headaches they did last year; the Spartans beat Fenwick twice during the regular season.

St. Mary’s will likely end up somewhere in the middle of the Division 3 bracket with a 14-8 record. There have been some growing pains this season as the Spartans struggled to replace 2015-16 leading scorer Marnelle Garraud, who transferred to Noble and Greenough. But with Temi Falayi (who left the Spartans’ regular-season finale with an injury) and Olivia Nazaire leading the charge, if players like Gabby Torres and Mia Nowicki have the hot hand, the Spartans can hang with anyone.

Classical is also having a strong season, boasting the best record (17-5) in 13 years. The Rams are undersized, but quick and scrappy. It’s always hard to judge the Division 1 tournament, though; last season, Classical was right in the middle of the pack in the division, cruising to a first-round win but struggling against top-seeded Lowell in the quarterfinals. However, Classical showed this season that it can hang with the top teams, as the Rams gave Revere, one of the strongest teams in the area and undefeated in the Northeastern Conference, all it could handle earlier this month in a 55-53 loss for Classical. If those two Division 1 teams meet in the tournament, there could be some fireworks.

Also in the tournament is the Revere boys basketball team, which made the playoffs for the first time in 16 years under new head coach David Leary. Leary coached the Tech boys last season, but left after one year and landed with the Patriots. He’s done a lot with the team over there; Revere doesn’t have a lot of stars, but Curtis High, who came off the bench for St. Mary’s last season, has emerged as a key piece for the Patriots. Revere is hitting its stride, to say the least, as it won eight of its last 10 games to finish 13-9.

Congratulations to the Peabody/Lynnfield girls hockey team for making the tournament for the first time in the program’s history. I can’t imagine the pressure the Tanners felt during Wednesday’s game against Melrose; both teams needed a point to clinch a tournament berth, and the game was scoreless through two periods. Of course, a tie would have gotten the job done for both teams, but the Tanners powered through and sent home four goals in the third. Playing that well under pressure bodes well for Peabody/Lynnfield going forward.

How cool is it that Lynn’s Marcos Echevarria, the star of the Nichols College men’s basketball team, leads the entire nation in three-pointers? Let that sink in for a minute; the sophomore has made more threes than anyone who will be playing during March Madness. That doesn’t happen very often.

Jennifer Marie O’Neill, 34

LYNN — Jennifer Marie O’Neill, age 34, of Lynn, died unexpectedly on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. She was the daughter of Brian O’Neill and his wife Elizabeth, of Lynn, and the late Marilyn (Sisson) O’Neill.

In addition to her father and step-mother, she is survived by her sisters and brother; Chantelle O’Neill, Brian O’Neill Jr. and his wife Amy, and Emma O’Neill, many aunts and uncles including Daniel O’Neill III and his wife Marie, and Joanie O’Neill and many cousins. She was also the granddaughter of the late Daniel Jr. and Joan C. O’Neill.

Service information: Funeral services under the direction of the SOLIMINE Funeral Homes 426 Broadway (Rte. 129), Lynn, will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations in Jennifer’s name may be made to St. Pius V Scholarship Fund c/o the St. Pius V School Development Fund 202 Maple St. Lynn, MA 01904. Guestbook at Solimine.com.

Norma B. Porter, 89

LYNN — Norma B. Porter, 89, of Lynn, beloved daughter of the late Amedeo and Louise Mancinelli and loving wife of the late Albiny J. Porter died at home on Feb. 22, 2017, surrounded by her family. She was born and raised in Lynn and educated in the Lynn School system, and was a former communicant of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church. Norma was employed in the old shoe factories and retired from the Boyd Potato Chip Company where she worked in packaging and then in the candy and chip store on Boston St. and then on the Lynnway for 15 years. She enjoyed gardening and spending time with her grandchildren who were the love of her life. Norma is survived by her three children Cynthia M. Bene’ and her husband Edward of Lynn, Diane M. Fay and her husband Peter of Greensboro, N.C., Kim J. Holey of Lynn, her sisters Gloria B. Solomon and her husband Wallace, Dolores L. Killeen, Carolyn B. Schnurbush and her husband Fred, nine grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, several nieces, nephews and cousins. She was the sister of the late Mary Bartlett, Amedeo Mancinelli, William “Bill” Mancinelli and Robert Mancinelli.

Service information: Services and burial were private. A memorial Mass will be held at a later date. Assisting the family with arrangements is the NADWORNY Funeral Home 798 Western Ave. Lynn. For guestbook please visit Nadwornyfuneralhome.com.

 

ICE rumors send chill through North Shore

PHOTO BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting in the Roosevelt Room of the White House.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN President Donald Trump’s high stakes effort to target millions of undocumented immigrants has frayed the nerves of many North Shore residents.

“There’s tremendous fear, uncertainty and confusion over what is happening with the administration’s crackdown and it’s not just people from Muslim countries,” said Denzil Mohammed, a director at the Immigrant Learning Center, a Malden nonprofit that educates the public on the contributions of immigrants.

During the campaign, Trump promised to end immigration as we know it. This week, the president equipped the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a division of the Department of Homeland Security, with the tools to potentially remove millions of undocumented residents from the country. The administration said serious criminals will be a top priority, but some are not so sure.

“People are worried and many of us are trying to figure out how to protect our families,” said Jose Palma, a Lynn resident who immigrated to the U.S. from El Salvador nearly 20 years ago and works as an organizer at Neighbor To Neighbor, a local advocacy group. “Everyone is talking about what we should do if immigration enforcement officers show up at our homes and what kind of documents we must have to keep us safe.”

Day without immigrants hits Lynn

Juan Gonzalez, a Guatemalan native and founder of the American Latino Committee, said rumors are rampant about raids that may have been held in Lynn.

“The chief of police has assured me that this is not true, but people are still on edge,” he said.

Through a spokesman, Deputy Chief  Michael Mageary said no ICE raids have been made in the city.

Typically, ICE agents notify the Lynn Police Department before coming to the city and inform them about any actions they intend to take, according to Lt. Rick Donnelly.  

If an arrest is to be made, a Lynn police officer would accompany the ICE agent and the suspect would be taken to the police station for documentation before being sent to a federal facility, he said.

“We will assist ICE if they have a warrant, but we are not immigration officers and we don’t knock on doors asking residents if they are here legally,” Donnelly said.

An ICE spokesman confirmed the agency is not conducting any operations in Massachusetts.

Still, as part of its work, ICE officers target and arrest criminal aliens and other individuals who are in violation of the country’s immigration laws, the spokesman said.

Gov. Charlie Baker said Massachusetts is part of a global community and he has no plans to change enforcement measures when it comes to immigrants.

“We benefit enormously from the presence, the intelligence and vitality of foreign-born people in the commonwealth and we are going to work hard to remain a welcoming place for everyone,” Baker told The Item. “We have no intention of changing any of our policies.”

Mohammed said there’s confusion among newcomers over Trump’s aggressive immigration policies.

“Everything is happening so fast,” he said. “Many immigrants are questioning their futures in this country. Think of how damaging it would be for local economies of big cities where immigrants have moved in and are helping to sustain and rebuild them.”

A report by the Partnership for a New American Economy, a coalition of mayors and business leaders who support immigration reforms, found that Massachusetts immigrants play a key role in the state as taxpayers and consumers.

In 2014, immigrant-led households in the Bay State earned $36.8 billion, 15 percent of all income earned by Massachusetts residents that year, the survey said. With those earnings, the state’s foreign-born households contributed more than one in every seven dollars paid by residents in state and local tax revenues, payments that support schools, police and fire protection, the study found.

Through their individual wage contributions, immigrants also paid about $4.6 billion into the Social Security and Medicare programs that year, researchers found. By spending the money they earn at businesses such as hair salons, grocery stores and coffee shops, the study said immigrants also support small business owners and job creation in the communities where they live.

The White House press office did not respond to a request for comment.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Lynn Tech deploys robot army

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
Carter Brinkler, Jessica Nelson, and Dani Davis work on the base of the robot they will enter in competition.

By BILL BROTHERTON

LYNN — It’s crunch time for the STEAMpunk Tigers. There’s a problem with the robot this group of Lynn high school students is entering in the FIRST Robotics Competition and the deadline is just hours away.

A gear is getting hung up on the robot’s bumper and students Carter Brinkler, Dani Davis and Jessica Nelson are huddled on the floor in the engineering lab at Lynn Vocational and Technical Institute, working together to reach a solution under the watchful eye of Malcolm Paradise, engineering instructor at LVTI.

Nearby, Michael Cabrera and Reece Archer are conferring with Kevin Ankiewicz, the programming and web design teacher, about the robot’s remote control features.

But the clock is ticking. It’s 3 p.m. on Tuesday and competition rules stipulate that at 10 p.m. sharp, all teams must bag their robot, secure it with a zip-tie and sign off.

For most students, this is school vacation week. But the faculty mentors, volunteers and student scientists on the STEAMpunk Tigers team are working overtime and stressing over eliminating every bug and kink before the deadline.

The team is seven weeks into the process, having met a minimum of five hours each weekday plus six hours every Saturday. Paradise and Michael Pickering, machine tool technology instructor, say with some 25 students in grades 9-12 at the city’s three public high schools, numerous volunteers and teachers involved, that equates to more than 2,000 man hours designing and getting the robot into fighting shape. That doesn’t include the time spent worrying about problems and how to solve them.

“It’s insane now, with deadline approaching,” said Pickering.

This is serious stuff. Some teams pull all-nighters leading up to the deadline; the Lynners didn’t go that far. Last year, the 25th year of competition, 3,128 teams with roughly 75,000 students and 19,000 mentors from 24 countries built robots.

Paradise said both the LVTI and district administration have been very supportive, making the school available to the team on weekends and holidays. He also thanked volunteers, including GE engineers Dan Cornelius and Ethan Heller, retired engineer Paul Woodley, Tech grads Anthony Tran and DJ Hegarty, and parent Dawn Davis, who delivered a chicken dinner to the team Monday night.

Paradise likens the competition itself to a NASCAR race. “We have to be responsive and quick, like a pit stop, to make repairs,” said Paradise. “Each game, one team head-to-head against another team, is about 2½ minutes long. A lot can go right and a lot can go wrong in 2½ minutes.” There are 50 to 75 matches per day.

“You win by playing,” said Paradise. “It doesn’t matter if your robot is the best. It’s the competition, the teaching, the lessons learned. … and it’s fun, a blast. Last year, the kids dressed up as Steampunks, with black hats, black clothes and funny glasses. Next week I expect they’ll work on their costumes for this year’s competition.”

“We’re always looking for more kids and parents to get involved,” added Paradise. “We need the soccer moms and the football-cheering parents here. The more kids we have, the more they can design and the less I design.”

Lynn man shares night photography

The team’s robot was indeed bagged and tagged Tuesday night. The gear issue was resolved. Next up is first-round district competitions in Bridgewater and Reading the weekends of March 3 and 10. If the STEAMpunk Tigers are fortunate enough to win several regional rounds, they would travel to Houston and then St. Louis for the finals in April.

But for now, Paradise says, the team can take a breath and reflect on a job well done. And sleep. “Tomorrow, everyone goes home and sleeps,” he said.


Bill Brotherton is The Item’s Features Editor. He can be reached at bbrotherton@itemlive.com.

 

Finding left from right on the streets of Lynn

PHOTO BY PAULA MULLER
Pictured are what appear to be conflicting street signs off Ocean Street in Lynn.

By LEAH DEARBORN

LYNN — The City of Lynn was settled more than three centuries ago; more than enough time for streets and buildings to develop some unusual nomenclature.

There’s the baffling intersection of Ocean Park and Greenleaf Circle, where two signs are posted on top of each other, making it difficult to determine where one street ends and the other begins.

“So where’s Greenleaf?” asked service professional Bruce Vining as he walked up the street, squinting at the signs. “It’s confusing. People should be aware of this.”

“We get a lot of people lost here,” said State Rep. Brendan Crighton (D-Lynn), who explained that Greenleaf, which connects to Nahant Street, is the name of the original cul-de-sac that existed before the development of Ocean Park.

The city also boasts Lover’s Leap and Dungeon avenues. In East Lynn, resident John Nicholson said he doesn’t know anyone named Patty on Patty’s Way.

There’s a presidential theme going on near the Saugus line, with streets named for Washington, Hayes, Harrison, Cleveland and Garfield.

Real estate agent Steven White was holding an open house for a property in the Diamond District on Tuesday, an area named for the wealth of its inhabitants, many of whom made their fortunes in the shoe industry.

A Marblehead resident, White said his town has its share of interesting names, like Gingerbread Hill.

Without leaving the eastern part of Lynn, residents can visit the Great Lakes as well; at least Superior, Michigan, Huron and Erie. Ontario Street is located farther inland, near Gallagher Park.

The question is whether the names have anything to do with the flooding that has historically occurred on the lake-themed streets, or if it’s merely a coincidence.

“I’ve lived in the area for 60 years and they’ve always had those names. I really don’t know why,” said Richard Coppinger, a former Ward 3 councilor.

Coppinger said a trek through Pine Grove Cemetery reveals a correlation between gravestones and street names.

The surnames of city pioneers such as Breed, Mudge, Newhall and Chase can be found on street signs as well as in the older areas of the cemetery, he said.

Coppinger said that of the names the city has to offer, however, he’s particularly fond of condo and apartment complexes with classic titles like the Breakers and the Biltmore.

Swampscott courts Marian purchase


Leah Dearborn can be reached at ldearborn@itemlive.com.

Revere hits the beach for February fun

By BRIDGET TURCOTTE
Katherine Rice looks for sea life with her binoculars during the Winter Beach Safari on Revere Beach.

REVERE — With a weeklong break from school, children are taking to the state’s beaches and marshes to explore and learn about the world around them.

The Department of Conservation and Recreation is hosting several free activities from now until Monday, when most students return to school.

At Revere Beach on Wednesday, Park Ranger Matthew Nash taught a group of children and their moms about the common shells that wash up on the sand. He identified oyster shells, mussel shells, snails, periwinkles, crab claws and razor clams, and showed them how a moon snail uses its radula to create a hole in a clam shell and suck out the meat.

The elementary-aged students identified items they hadn’t yet learned about and came at Nash equipped with plenty of questions.

Six-year-old Katherine Rice arrived prepared with binoculars, a bird book and a clipboard.

“I like looking around and being at the beach,” she said.

Her mom, biologist Melissa Rice, said she enjoyed spending time at the beach without the crowds.

“We live in Malden so we go to the Stone Zoo a lot to learn about animals and wildlife,” said Lisa Sears, who brought her daughter. “We’re always looking for fun and interesting fact-based programs where my daughter can run around.”

The same program will be offered today at 1 p.m. at Nahant Beach in Lynn. Participants should meet at the James J. Ward Bath House on the ocean side near the outdoor showers.

Wednesday morning Nash led a small group of bird watchers who came across a snowy owl on Winthrop Beach.

A Winter Wildlife Detectives activity will be today at 9 a.m. at the Belle Isle Marsh Reservation. Children can learn about coyotes and other creatures that are active during the winter. Nash asks that attendees wear hiking boots or shoes and consider the weather when layering up.

“School vacation week serves as an excellent opportunity for people of all ages to get outside and enjoy the natural world that surrounds us,” said Energy of Environmental Affairs Secretary Matthew Beaton in a statement. “I encourage residents and families to explore the commonwealth’s many environmental, cultural and recreational resources.”

Green Line project short list to help Medford


Bridget Turcotte can be reached at bturcotte@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @BridgetTurcotte.

Police log: 2-23-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Misael Echevarria, 36, of 98 Green St., was arrested and charged with two counts of failure to register as a sex offender at 10:01 a.m. Wednesday.

Daniel Knittle, 23, of 8 Victoria Lane, Marblehead, was arrested and charged with defacing property/tagging at 2:06 a.m. Wednesday.

Alex Ledford was arrested on a warrant charge of assault and battery at 7:38 p.m. Tuesday.

Patrick Lynch, 48, of 58 Estes St., was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 4:14 p.m. Tuesday.

Jose Marte, 41, of 124 Eastern Ave., was arrested and charged with operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license and on warrant charges for motor vehicle violations at 10:57 a.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 2:17 p.m. Tuesday at Commercial Street and Lynnway.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:54 p.m. Tuesday at Broad and Silsbee streets; at 4:10 p.m. Tuesday at Maple and Chatham streets; at 8:54 a.m. Wednesday at Allston and Lynnfield streets; at 11:06 a.m. Wednesday at 235 Boston St.; at 1:53 p.m. Wednesday at 60 Boston St.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 9:13 p.m. Tuesday at Broad and Union streets; at 9:21 p.m. Tuesday at 123 Western Ave.; at 9:34 a.m. Wednesday at Chestnut and Essex streets.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 7:16 p.m. Tuesday on Market Street.

A report of a sexual assault at 7:51 p.m. Tuesday on Summer Street.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 4:56 p.m. Tuesday at 63 Lynnway; at 8:04 p.m. Tuesday at Belden Bly Bridge on Western Avenue; at 11:57 p.m. Tuesday at 631 Eastern Ave.; at 1:03 p.m. Wednesday at 11 Adams Court.

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 7:37 a.m. Wednesday at 14 B St.; at 8:08 a.m. Wednesday at 44 Baltimore St.

Complaints

A report of a gunshot at 8:12 p.m. Tuesday at Essex and Jackson streets.

A report of a disturbance at 8:24 p.m. Tuesday at MBTA Parking Garage at 186 Market St.; at 8:31 p.m. Tuesday at 33 High St.; at 8:42 p.m. Tuesday at 740 Summer St.; at 8:54 p.m. Tuesday at 145 Lewis St.; at 9:52 p.m. Tuesday at 52 Holly Ave.; at 10:38 p.m. Tuesday at 9 Oakwood Ave.; at 2:04 a.m. Wednesday at 43 President St.; at 2:49 a.m. Wednesday at 563 Boston St.; at 9:54 a.m. Wednesday at 501 Washington St.; at 10:36 a.m. Wednesday at 330 Lynnway; at 1:49 p.m. Wednesday at 80 Boston St.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 4:09 p.m. Tuesday at 23 Broad St.; at 7:03 p.m. Tuesday at 7 Barrett Court.

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 8:20 p.m. Tuesday at 103 Washington St.; at 7:10 a.m. Wednesday at 36 Western Ave.

Police log: 2-22-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Arrests

Stephen P. Molinari, 33, of 88 Pennybrook Road, Lynn, was arrested and charged with possession with intent to distribute a Class D drug, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, uninsured motor vehicle, unregistered motor vehicle, attaching plate, receiving stolen property and shoplifting by asportation at 6:11 p.m. Tuesday.

Paige A. Rumson, 27, of 12 Golden Drive, Apt. 3, Winthrop, was arrested on a warrant at 6:11 p.m. Tuesday.

Complaints

A caller reported her neighbor was putting cones out preventing people from parking on the street at 8:25 a.m. Tuesday. Police informed the woman that she could move the cones and park on the street. She told police “I don’t want to, as I don’t want to start anything with the neighbors. She wanted an officer to come down and remove the cones.

A report of a disturbance at 8:43 a.m. Tuesday on Pleasant Street.

A caller reported that a man was walking in the street with headphones on and no dog at 5:22 p.m. Tuesday at Tedesco Street and Leggs Hill Road. She was concerned because she always sees him with a dog. Police found the man and reported he was fine. He was just trying to avoid snowbanks.


PEABODY

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 4:44 p.m. Tuesday at 12 Alden Road.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday at Century House Restaurant at 235 Andover St.; at 8:43 a.m. Wednesday at Sonic Drive-in at 55 Newbury St.; at 9:13 a.m. Wednesday at 629 Lowell St. and 156 Goodale St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 11:36 p.m. Tuesday at The Cheesecake Factory at 210C Andover St. A registration car booklet and about $10 worth of change was taken from the car.

Complaints

A report of a suspicious motor vehicle at 7:34 p.m. Tuesday at 22 Reynolds Road. A caller reported a suspicious car drove by the residence before and flashed lights at it. Police spoke with a resident of Tammie Lane who stated he came upon a car with youths in it and was concerned because his vehicle had been broken into in the past, which was why he was shining his lights around the neighborhood. Police told the people involved not to interact with each other.

A report of a disturbance at 7:56 p.m. Tuesday at Pierpont Park on Pierpont Street. A caller reported several youths fighting. Police reported the youths were not fighting; at 11:40 p.m. Tuesday at 16 Burford Road. A caller reported someone banging on her door. Police reported the person had the wrong address; at 4:39 a.m. Wednesday at 14 Collins St.

Fire

A report of an oven fire at 6:16 p.m. Tuesday at 43 Paleologos St. The blaze was handled by the fire department.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 11:39 a.m. Wednesday on Silverleaf Way. The person was taken to Lahey Hospital.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 7:47 p.m. Tuesday at 103 Central St. An elderly woman reported a piece of furniture that belonged to her was missing from outside her apartment.


REVERE

Arrests

Richard D. Linares, 23, of 144 Washington St., Apt. 7, Peabody, was arrested on a warrant at 4:27 p.m. Tuesday.

Roy M. Stuart, 36, of 199 Constitution Ave., was arrested on warrants at 3:33 a.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 12 p.m. Tuesday at Tedeschi Food Mart on Squire Road; at 2:54 p.m. Tuesday on Brown Circle; at 3:32 p.m. Tuesday at Beachmont Liquors on Winthrop Avenue; at 4:36 p.m. Tuesday on Bennington Street; at 6:13 p.m. Tuesday at North Shore Road and Revere Street; at 6:14 p.m. Tuesday on Copeland Circle.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 1:54 p.m. Tuesday on Beach Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 5:35 p.m. Tuesday on Crescent Avenue.

Theft

A report of a larceny/forgery/fraud at 2:34 a.m. Tuesday on Hillside Avenue.


SAUGUS

Arrests

Justin B. Blood, of 50 Hood St., Apt. 2, Lynn, was arrested and charged with no inspection/sticker and operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license at 3:24 p.m. Tuesday.

Brian M. Sevoich, of 06 Bailey Ave., was arrested and charged with carjacking at 11:10 p.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 10:38 a.m. Tuesday at Noah’s Motors at 622 Broadway.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at 3:56 p.m. Tuesday across Stocker Field. A caller reported a man with a small gun. He stated he was unsure if the man was shooting animals in the water, but was lingering along the bike path across from the field. Police reported the man was practicing shooting targets with his airsoft gun and went home for the night.

Helene Ross, 73

NORTHHAMPTON — Helene “Lenie” Ross, age 73, of West Hatfield, former longtime resident of Lynn, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, at Cooley Dickinson Hospital in Northampton. She was born on April 25, 1943, in Boston, the daughter of the late Geronimo and Helen (Collins) Pryor. She was raised and educated in Lynn. Lenie owned and operated “Nana’s Place” Laundromat at the corner of Western Ave and Chatham Street in Lynn for many years. Family meant everything to Lenie. She loved to spend time with her children and grandchildren.

She is survived by her daughter, Anna Start and husband, Robert of West Hatfield, her sons; John J. Ross and wife, Jennifer of Rowley and Tony M. Ross and wife, Heather of Norton Shores, Mich. She is survived by six brothers and two sisters. Eight grandchildren as well as numerous nieces and nephews also survive her. Lenie was predeceased by two brothers and one sister.

Service information: Calling hours are on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, from 1-5 p.m. at CUFFE-McGINN Funeral Home, 157 Maple St., Lynn, MA 01904. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017 at 11 a.m. at St. Pius V Church, 215 Maple St., in Lynn. Burial will follow in Puritan Lawn Memorial Park in Peabody. In lieu of flowers, donations are requested to the veteran’s charity of one’s choice. Please visit Cuffemcginn.com for directions, or to sign the online guestbook.

Victor L. Tseki, 88

Victor L. “Vic” Tseki passed away on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Brockton after a period of declining health.

Born in Lynn on Sept. 15, 1928, he was the son of the late Louis Tseki and Pearl (Sharko) Tseki. Vic attended public schools in Lynn and was a graduate of Lynn English High School. He continued his education at Salem State College, where he graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Education. He later earned a Master’s Degree in Education Administration from Boston College. Vic spent his professional career in education with the Lynn school department. He served the city as a teacher and eventually a long-time principal with the Tracy and Shoemaker Elementary Schools. Vic also dedicated his time to help coach sports at school. Vic married his sweetheart, Ruth M. Hayes in Lynn on Aug. 25, 1956. The couple spent more than 60 years in marriage and love together while raising and caring for their family. Vic was an avid Boston College football fan who attended many games and was a member of the Boston College club of Naples, Fla. He enjoyed running and finished two Boston Marathons. He liked reading, walking along beaches, spending time with his wife, children and granddaughter, and a good beer. Vic was a longtime resident on the North Shore until his retirement and then spent several years as a full-time resident of Naples, Fla. Vic is survived by his wife Ruth M. (Hayes) Tseki of Stoughton, his daughter, Susan Tseki McManus and her husband, Paul J. McManus Jr. of Stoughton, and his son, David L. Tseki and his wife, Julie (Campbell) Tseki of Peabody. He is also survived by his granddaughter, Hayley M. McManus. Vic is also survived by his brother, Robert Tseki and his wife Susan of Marblehead as well as his brother-in-law, Robert Thomson Sr. of Lynn. Vic also leaves several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his sister Margaret (Tseki) Thomson.

Service information: Family and friends are invited to attend visiting hours in the CUFFE-McGINN Funeral Home, 157 Maple St., Lynn on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017 from 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. followed by a memorial service in the funeral home at 12 p.m. A private burial in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Lynn will be held at a later date. At Vic’s request, please do not send flowers. For online guestbook, please visit Cuffemcginn.com.

 

Julie Whitney, 68

LYNN — Julie (Scanlon) Whitney, 68, died Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, at Union Hospital in Lynn, following a lengthy illness. She was the wife of Carl Whitney, and the daughter of the late Donald and Margaret (Buckley) Scanlon.

Born on Dec. 16, 1948, in Lynn, she has lived in Lynn all her life. She graduated from Lynn English High School, Class of 1967, and attended North Shore Community College. Julie worked for 24 years for the City of Lynn as a special needs teacher’s aid. A generous and kind person, the most important part of Julie’s life was the time she spent with the family and friends that she loved.  

Besides her loving husband Carl, of 48 years, she is survived by her siblings Donald Scanlon and his wife Susan of Lynn, Elizabeth Saghir and her husband Abdelhakim of Lynn, Mary Jane Grace of Lynn and Christopher Scanlon of Virginia Beach, Va., her grandchildren, Cody, Owen, Autumn and Samantha, as well as many nieces and nephews. She was the mother of the late Jason Whitney, who died Oct. 26, 2016.

Service information: A funeral service will be held in the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Rt. 129) Lynn, on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. Visitation with Julie’s family will be from 12–1:30 p.m. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Massachusetts General Hospital Development, 125 Nashua St., Boston, MA 02114. Directions and guestbook at Solimine.com.

Condo sales sail in Lynn

ITEM GRAPHIC
This graphic shows the increase in North Shore condominium sales from 2015-2016. 

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Condominium sales in the city made the biggest splash on the North Shore last year as buyers sought alternatives to higher prices closer to Boston.

The number of condos sold in 2016 soared by a whopping 48 percent in Lynn to 225 units, up from 152 in 2015, according to The Warren Group, the Boston-based real estate tracking firm.

Perhaps the most attractive thing about Lynn condos was the low cost, say agents. The median price of a condo last year was $180,000, up less than 1 percent from $178,500 in 2015.

In contrast, buyers faced sticker shock in competing cities that are out of reach for many potential buyers. In Chelsea, the median was $317,000, East Boston reached $416,000, Somerville was $580,000 and South Boston topped out at $631,000.

“Buyers are choosing Lynn because it’s more affordable,” said Michael Connor, owner-manager at Connor Real Estate in Lynn. “There’s great value for your money here compared to other cities.”

Colleen Toner, broker-owner of Toner Real Estate in Lynn, said the soaring cost of apartments in Lynn is driving condo sales. A tenant paying $1,500 in rent would pay less than $1,200 per month for a $200,000 condo with 5 percent down.

The other factor that drove sales last year was low interest rates, Toner said.

The average mortgage interest rate in 2016 was 3.65 percent. That’s down from 4.17 percent in 2014, according to Freddie Mac, the federal agency that provides mortgage capital to lenders.

Revere was the only other North Shore city to demonstrate a strong sales condo market as 204 units sold last year compared to 156 in 2015, a 31 percent hike. While sales increased, median prices fell by 4.4 percent to $267,200 last year, down from $279,500 in 2015.

Four communities, including Peabody, Swampscott, Lynnfield and Marblehead, saw sales fall but prices rise.

In Peabody, 154 units sold in 2016, down more than 9 percent from 2015 levels when sales reached 170. But the median price rose to $267,750 last year, up from $254,500 in 2015, a 5.2 percent hike.

Sales of condos in Swampscott slipped to 62 last year from 69 in 2015, a 10 percent drop, as median prices increased by 4 percent to $255,000 last year, up from $244,900 in 2015.

Lynnfield condo sales fell by 30 percent with 14 units sold last year, down from 20 in 2015. But the median price increased by 60 percent to $709,900, up from $440,000 in 2015.

In Marblehead, 52 condos sold last year, down from 57 in 2015, a nearly 9 percent dip while median prices rose to $350,750, a 14 percent increase over the 2015 level of $307,500.

Sales were flat in Nahant, which has a small condo market. Just six units sold last year, the same as in 2015. But median prices showed the biggest increase on the North Shore and reached $370,000 last year, up from $209,300, a 77 percent jump.  

Only Saugus experienced fewer sales and a drop in the median price. A total of 54 condos sold last year, down from 56 in 2015 while the median fell to $286,000 last year from $323,750 in 2015, a nearly 12 percent dip.

Saugus staking out a Hilltop vision


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Baker fundraiser tops the menu at Porthole

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
Gov. Charlie Baker is interviewed at the entrance to the Porthole Restaurant.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — The 2018 governor’s race is 20 months away and Gov. Charlie Baker hasn’t even said if he will seek a second term.

But that didn’t stop the popular Republican from holding a fundraiser at the Porthole Restaurant Tuesday night with a few dozen supporters including fellow GOP Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy.

“I support the governor,” said Kennedy. “I endorsed him the first time around and I think he’s done a good job for the commonwealth keeping an eye on the finances. I support him for reelection.”

The Item was invited to the event by the Mass GOP. But the party’s finance consultant stopped a reporter at the door saying it was private. Participants paid $250, $500 or $1,000 to chat with the governor and enjoy appetizers.

Saugus staking out a Hilltop vision

“This is in my backyard,” Baker said before going in, referencing his Swampscott address. “There will be people in there that I’ve known a lot longer than just my life in politics, so we will spend some time talking about the commonwealth, the success we’ve had improving the economy and some of the initiatives we’ve been pursuing on the opioid epidemic.”

Baker declined to say whether he is planning to run for reelection.

“Karyn (Lt. Gov. Polito) and I have talked about having this conversation at some point this year, but we haven’t had it yet,” he said. “There’s enough stuff … that we have to follow through on, like dealing with the MBTA or the opioid epidemic. We’ve made lots of progress on the Department of Children & Families and we have tons of work to do there. And then there’s a question of what would we want a second term to be about.  We were clear when we got into this … that we wanted to focus on strong communities, a strong economy and strong schools, and bring that fix-it mentality to state government. For the most part we’ve been reasonably successful.”

But not everyone agrees. So far, at least two Democrats have expressed interest in the governor’s job.

Jay Gonzalez, the former budget chief for former Democratic Gov. Deval Patrick, has said he plans to challenge the popular incumbent.

He said the Bay State needs a governor who will stand up to Republican President Donald Trump and defend the state’s values. He said the governor too often sits on the political sidelines.

“There are too many people in our state, families, working families, who are still struggling to get ahead,” Gonzalez told WBZ. “There are too many people who need a governor who’s going to stand up and make sure they know that every single person in the state is included and is welcome and that the governor’s going to be there to fight for them. Right now I don’t think we have a governor that’s doing that.”

The other potential challenger is Newton Mayor Setti Warren. In a recent interview with The Item, the Democrat said he will back a tax on millionaires to help pay for needed school, transit and housing initiatives. He said fellow Democrats are too timid to call for more taxes.

“We have economic growth, but people are struggling,” he said. “There is a case to be made that we can do better.”

If he runs, Setti said his focus would be on on improving schools, housing and transportation with cash from a new 4 percent tax on residents whose income exceeds $1 million. The question on whether to impose the tax is expected to be on the November ballot.

The other person being talked about is Attorney General Maura Healey. The Democrat trounced her Republican opponent John Miller in 2014 with nearly 62 percent of the vote. But on Tuesday she tried to squash persistent chatter that she may run for governor next year, saying that the role of attorney general has never been more important.

“I’m running for reelection,” Healey said on WGBH’s Boston Public Radio on Tuesday. “It’s never been as important as it is now to do my job and do my job well. Certainly we have our hands full, so that’s what I’m focused on.”

Whoever takes on Baker, it won’t be easy. In a recent survey by WBUR, Baker was more popular than liberal Democrat Sen. Elizabeth Warren. Only 44 percent said Warren deserves reelection while 51 percent view her favorably.

In contrast, Baker’s favorability rating is 59 percent — 8 points better than Warren. Even more striking is that only 29 percent of poll respondents think someone else should get a chance at the governor’s office, the survey said.

If he does decide to run, Baker has amassed a $4.7 million war chest, according to his most recent report with the Massachusetts Office of Campaign and Political Finance. That doesn’t include his take on the Porthole fundraiser.

James Cowdell, executive director of the Lynn Economic Development and Industrial Corp., the city’s development bank, who attended the event, praised Baker for creating the Lynn Economic Advancement and Development (LEAD) team with the mayor whose mission is to cut through the bureaucracy and jumpstart construction on the Lynnway.

“We have major projects in the pipeline. The governor lives next door to us in Swampscott, and we are hoping for continued good things in Lynn,” he said.

Material from the Associated Press and State House News was used in this report.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Lynn man shares night photography

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JAMES NALESNIK
“I went out last night to take a few pictures and I would like to share them,” Nalesnik wrote in a message to The Item.

LYNN James Nalesnik is happy with a small collection of photos he took in the city Tuesday night, and wants to share them.

“One hour of shooting around Lynn … this is my first time doing night photography with a DSLR Canon Rebel T6i,” he wrote Wednesday in a Facebook message to The Item.

Blood-covered man faces attempted murder

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN — Joshua Smith, 22, was arrested on Sunday after allegedly stabbing an 18-year-old Lynn man multiple times throughout his face and body.

Smith, also from Lynn, is charged with attempted murder, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and mayhem.

Police responded to a report of a stabbing on Autumn Street shortly before 6 p.m. on Sunday. Officers found the victim with multiple stab wounds throughout his face and body, with some bleeding profusely, but the victim was conscious and alert, Lynn Police Lt. Rick Donnelly said.

The victim was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital with life-threatening injuries, but was later reported to be in stable condition, Donnelly said.

Police got Smith’s name as a suspect through witnesses who had seen the incident. Officers then received a call for another person stabbed at 30 Harwood St. When police arrived, they saw a large amount of blood on the sidewalk and a snowbank. Blood droplets in the front hallway led up to an apartment door, Donnelly said.

Officers knocked on the door and after someone opened it, they saw the suspect in the house covered in blood. Donnelly said Smith had some minor cuts, but the blood wasn’t his.

Donnelly said the victim is going to be left with permanent scars and marks to his face from the knife slashes. He said a mayhem charge stems from when someone is seriously maimed or disfigured.

Authorities: 2nd murder suspect still out there


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley.

Police log: 2-22-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to the Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Matthew Elwell, of 136 Western Ave., was arrested on warrant charges of shoplifting by asportation and assault with a dangerous weapon at 9:24 a.m. Tuesday.

Ivan Gonzalez-Rodriguez, of 65 Whiting St., was arrested on warrant charges of operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and passing violation at 5:17 p.m. Monday.

James Legault, of 540 Chestnut St., was arrested on a warrant charge of larceny at 7:52 p.m. Monday.

Dale Lundquist, of 101 Lynnway, was arrested on a warrant at 7:40 p.m. Monday.

Rebecca Morris, of 167 North Common St., was arrested on warrant charges of two counts of operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license, disguise to obstruct justice, Class B drug possession, Class E drug possession and forging/misusing an RMV document at 6:36 p.m. Monday.

Fernando Murga, 32, was arrested and charged with urinating in public at 5:52 p.m. Monday.

Orlando Vales, 30, of 77 Marion St., was arrested and charged with operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license at 1:14 p.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:50 p.m. Monday at 322 Essex St.; at 9:12 a.m. Tuesday at Hanover and Washington streets; at 10:07 a.m. Tuesday on Harding Street; at 10:24 a.m. Tuesday at 67 Tudor St.; at 11:09 a.m. Tuesday at 269 Union St.; at 11:23 a.m. Tuesday on Silsbee Street.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 1:41 a.m. Tuesday at Boston and Federal streets.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 4:24 a.m. Tuesday at 618 Boston St.; at 7:56 a.m. Tuesday at 40 Broad St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 2:56 p.m. Monday at 285 Lynn Shore Drive; at 4:48 p.m. Monday at 780 Lynnway; at 5:48 p.m. Monday at 106 Curwin Circle; at 6:11 p.m. Monday at 48 Newhall St.; at 6:25 p.m. Monday at 63 Curwin Circle; at 6:29 p.m. Monday at 50 Newhall St.; at 2:38 a.m. Tuesday at 12 Rockmere Gardens; at 11:33 a.m. Tuesday at Boston and Washington streets; at 12:20 p.m. Tuesday at 422 Walnut St.; at 12:26 p.m. Tuesday at 80 Sagamore St.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 3:31 p.m. Monday on Western Avenue; at 6:20 p.m. Monday on Chestnut Street; at 8:08 p.m. Monday on Eastern Avenue; at 9:39 p.m. Monday on Spring Street.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 4:29 p.m. Monday at 9 Broad St.; at 8:03 p.m. Monday at 180 Commercial St.; at 8:18 p.m. Monday at 30 Boston St.

Police log: 2-21-2017


LYNNFIELD

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 12:27 p.m. Thursday at Whole Foods Market at 100 Market St.; at 1:44 p.m. Thursday at 180 Salem St.; at 7:39 a.m. Friday at 1 Hutchins Circle and 529 Main St.; at 3:21 p.m. Friday at Kings Entertainment at 510 Market St.; at 8:47 p.m. Friday on Market Street; at 10:38 p.m. Saturday at 65 Brook Drive and 326 S Broadway; at 6:38 p.m. Monday at Bali-Hai Restaurant at 93 Moulton Drive.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 8:48 p.m. Friday at 730 Market St.


MARBLEHEAD

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 10:47 a.m. Monday at Bessom and Pleasant streets; at 4:26 p.m. Monday at Pleasant and Spring streets.


PEABODY

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 3:23 p.m. Monday at 2 Prospect St. and 363 Lowell St.; at 4:17 p.m. Monday at 8 Pine St.; at 5:54 p.m. Monday on Lowell Street; at 10:23 a.m. Tuesday at 6 Essex Center Drive; at 10:24 a.m. Tuesday at 15 Peabody Road and 0 Clark Road; at 11:35 a.m. Tuesday at Perfecto’s Cafe at 515 Lowell St.; at 12:07 p.m. Tuesday at TD Bank at 31 Cross St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 2:26 p.m. Monday at 6 Spring St. A woman reported the house was broken into. Heaters were stolen, but no one was living in the house.

Complaints

A caller reported a neighbor putting snow in the street at 2:02 p.m. Monday at 17 Linden Road. Police had the man remove the debris from the road.

A report of suspicious activity at 11:19 p.m. Monday on Felton Street. More than 15 callers reported loud explosions in the area of Brooksby Farm. Police reported all was in order after an area check and that all the houses had power.

A report of a disturbance at 12:03 p.m. Tuesday at Today’s Insurance at 66 Main St.  


REVERE

Arrests

Kathleen K. Baltzer, 46, of 120 Winthrop Ave., was arrested and charged with unregistered motor vehicle, operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended registration, habitual traffic offender and on warrants at 5:38 p.m. Saturday.

Andre F. Peixoto, 31, of 234 Highland St., New Bedford, was arrested and charged with disorderly person and disturbing the peace at 3:19 a.m. Sunday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 7:33 a.m. Friday on North Shore Road; at 11:47 a.m. Friday at Sunoco Gas Station on Broadway; at 6:41 p.m. Friday at Sargent Street and Jefferson Drive; at 10:33 p.m. Friday at Squire Road and Mccoba Street; at 2:06 p.m. Saturday on Squire Road; at 5:23 p.m. Saturday on Copeland Circle; at 6:48 p.m. Saturday at Hampton Inn on Lee Burbank Highway; at 7:24 p.m. Saturday on Ocean Avenue; at 12:33 a.m. Sunday at Wonderland Entertainment at North Shore Road and Shawmut Street; at 2 a.m. Sunday at Wonderland Entertainment on North Shore Road; at 9:56 a.m. Sunday on Lucia Avenue; at 12:03 p.m. Sunday at Shaw’s Supermarket on Revere Beach Parkway; at 12:42 p.m. Sunday on S Furness Street; at 2:09 p.m. Sunday at Harley Davidson on Squire Road; at 3:03 p.m. Sunday at Market Basket on Squire Road; at 8:34 p.m. Sunday on Carey Circle; at 5:34 p.m. Monday on Highland Street.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 8:27 p.m. Friday on Charger Street; at 1:14 p.m. Saturday on Eliot Road; at 3:16 p.m. Sunday at Market Basket on Squire Road.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident with personal injury at 10:07 p.m. Sunday at Blanchards Liquors on American Legion Highway.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 2:01 p.m. Friday on Dehon Street; at 8:40 p.m. Friday at Revere Housing Authority on Hutchinson Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 4:34 a.m. Friday on Emmet Terrace; at 11:23 a.m. Friday on Fernwood Avenue; at 4:11 p.m. Friday on South Avenue; at 4:39 p.m. Friday at Cosmo Pools on Washington Avenue; at 3:04 a.m. Saturday on Tuscano Avenue; at 10:24 a.m. Saturday on Winthrop Avenue; at 1:48 p.m. Saturday on Malden Street; at 4:23 p.m. Saturday on Malden Street. Sherri L. Marano, 45, of 925 Revere Beach Parkway, was summoned for vandalizing property; at 8:10 p.m. Saturday on Revere Beach Parkway; at 9:50 p.m. Saturday at Planet Fitness on Charger Street; at 9:57 p.m. Saturday on Olive Street; at 10:45 p.m. Saturday on Shirley Avenue; at 11:46 p.m. Saturday on Garfield Avenue; at 12:08 a.m. Sunday on Beach Street; at 12:19 a.m. Sunday at Carlyle House Condominiums on Ward Street; at 12:33 a.m. Sunday on Wave Avenue; at 1:06 a.m. Sunday on Beach Street; at 2:45 a.m. Sunday on Revere Beach Parkway; at 3:08 a.m. Sunday on Reservoir Avenue; at 3:12 p.m. Sunday on Bellingham Avenue; at 4:36 p.m. Sunday on Park Avenue; at 6:55 p.m. Sunday on Newbury Street; at 11:22 p.m. Sunday on Standish Road; at 2:45 a.m. Monday on Agawam Street; at 3:36 a.m. Monday on Ocean Avenue; at 8:57 a.m. Monday on Carleton Street; at 10:19 p.m. Monday on Walnut Avenue.

Overdose

A report of a possible overdose at 3:39 p.m. Friday on Revere Beach Boulevard.

Theft

A report of a larceny/forgery/fraud at 3:47 p.m. Friday at Target on Furlong Drive; at 10:23 a.m. Saturday at New Revere Police Station on Revere Street; at 3:48 p.m. Sunday at Revere Housing Authority on Rose Street.

A report of a larceny at 9:03 a.m. Monday on Campbell Avenue.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 7:06 a.m. Friday on Jones Road; at 2:55 p.m. Friday on Bellingham Avenue.


SAUGUS

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 1:40 p.m. Saturday at 240 Lincoln Ave. and 7 Bristow St.; at 2:08 p.m. Saturday at Lynn Fells Parkway and Forest Street; at 10:04 a.m. Monday on Nickole Circle.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 4:21 p.m. Saturday at 259 Essex St.; at 4:34 p.m. Monday at Central and Elm streets.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 1:06 p.m. Sunday on Essex Street. One person was taken to Melrose Wakefield Hospital; at 2:36 p.m. Monday at Sports World at 87 Broadway.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 4:09 p.m. Sunday at Kelly’s Roast Beef at 595 Broadway; at 4:15 p.m. Sunday at Target at 400 Lynn Fells Parkway; at 11:29 a.m. Monday at 30 Spencer Ave.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 4:44 p.m. Friday at Square One Mall at 1201 Broadway. Mall Security reported a customer got into an altercation with an employee in the food court and smashed the tip jar; at 7:50 p.m. Saturday at Kentucky Fried Chicken at 421 Broadway; at 11:20 p.m. Sunday at Extra Space Storage at 640 Broadway.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 2:21 p.m. Friday at New York and Company at 1201 Broadway. A loss prevention manager reported there had been 11 total fraudulent returns totaling more than $4,000 and identified a suspect; at 3:04 p.m. Saturday at 21 Newhall Ave. A caller reported a PCA worker had stolen jewelry from the apartment; at 2:45 p.m. Sunday at Victoria’s Secret at 1277 Broadway. A manager reported a past theft of $700; at 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Macy’s/Square One Mall at 1201 Broadway. A caller reported her credit cards were stolen from her wallet while she was in the store.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 8:12 a.m. Friday at 66 Denver St. A caller reported his tires were slashed on his vehicle.


SWAMPSCOTT

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 4:07 p.m. Monday at 11 Plymouth Ave.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 4:18 p.m. Monday at Blaney Street and Thorndike Terrace.

Judith DeRoo, 74

SAUGUS — Judith (Buchonis) DeRoo, age 74 years, of Saugus, passed away on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, at her home, surrounded by her loving family, after a lengthy illness. She was the wife of Gary DeRoo, and the daughter of the late Peter G. and Edith M. (Cross) Buchonis.

Born on Oct. 5, 1942 in Lynn, she lived in Lynn for many years before moving to Saugus 28 years ago. She was a graduate of Lynn English High School and worked as a prep to braze technician at General Electric until her retirement.

Judith enjoyed her church, spending time with her family, especially her grandchildren and the time she spent at their sporting events. She loved her friends and was a fan of the North Shore Navigators, enjoying the games at Fraser field in Lynn.

Besides her loving husband Gary of 30 years, she is survived by her son, David Harder of Saugus; her daughter, Deborah Harder of Lynn; her two grandchildren, Justin Devaney of Lynn and Jennifer Testa of Lee, N.H.; and her two great grandchildren, Logan Rose and Austin Allison. She was the sister of the late Richard G. Buchonis.

Service information: Her funeral will be held from the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Route 129), Lynn, on Friday at 9:30 a.m., followed by a funeral Mass at St. Mary’s Church, Lynn, at 10:30 a.m. Interment will be in Swampscott Cemetery. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. Visiting hours will be Thursday from 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 30 Speen St., Framingham, MA 01701. Directions and guest book at Solimine.com.

 

Olaf A. Olsson Jr., 93

BEVERLY — Olaf Arlan Olsson Jr., age 93, of Beverly, formerly of Lynn and Nahant, died peacefully at his home in Beverly on Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017. He was the loving husband of the late Jean D. (Cammett) Olsson, with whom he shared 63 years of marriage.

A World War II veteran, he served as a sergeant in the U.S. Army 86th Infantry 10th Mountain Division in Italy and participated in the Po Valley and North Apennines offensives. He was awarded a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star medal for valor.

“Olie” worked as a maintenance supervisor for 33 years at Amicon Corp. He was a member of the Mount Carmel Masonic Lodge and had previously served as a deacon at Nahant Village Church. He was a former president of the Lynn English Alumni Association and was also a member of the 10th Mountain Division Alumni Association. In his later years, he thrived as an active resident of the Oceanview Assisted Living Facility, where he was the initiator and leader of the weekly current event discussions.  

He is survived by two daughters, Nancy Linscott of Beverly and Linnea Olsson and her partner Elizabeth Dickinson of Arlington; one son, Charles Olsson and his wife Jean of Marshfield; four grandchildren, Christina Craig and her husband Kevin, Andrew Linscott and his wife Robin Bartlett, Mark Linscott and his wife Robyn and Cara Olsson; in addition to four great grandchildren. He also leaves several nieces and a nephew, as well as his two close friends from Oceanview, Peter Stevens and Janice O’Brien.

Service information: Memorial funeral services will be held on Saturday at 11 a.m. in the Nahant Village Church. Memorial visiting hours will be held on Friday from 4-8 p.m. in the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 67 Ocean St. (Route 1A), Lynn. Donations in his memory may be made to Honor Flight New England, P.O. Box 16287, Hooksett, NH 03106 www.honorflightnewengland.org, or Wounded Warriors Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka KS 66675. www.woundedwarriorproject.org. Directions and guestbook at Solimine.com.

Ronald F. Baker, 50

LYNN — Ronald F. Baker, age 50 years, of Lynn, died unexpectedly Saturday at Union Hospital, after being stricken at home. He was the husband of Colleen L. (Kane) Baker, with whom he shared 18 years of marriage.

Born in Malden, he is the son of James F. Baker of Webster and the late Theresa (Wisdom) Baker. He attended schools in Burlington and graduated from Shawsheen Technical High School in Billerica, Class of 1984.

Ron was employed as an assistant vice president, business consultant at the Bank of America in Boston. He was a member of Wakefield Lynnfield United Methodist Church in Wakefield. Ron enjoyed fresh water fishing, running, watching his children play sports and spending time with his family.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by two sons, Kevin and Jonathan Baker; a daughter, Maegan Baker, all of Lynn; a brother, James and his wife Cheryl Baker of Billerica; a sister, Laurene and her wife Sally Baker-Quick of Methuen; his father and mother-in-law, James and Kathy Kane of Lynn; a brother-in-law, James Kane Jr. of Salem, and many nieces and nephews.

Service information: Funeral services will be held at PARKER Funeral Home, 35 Franklin St., Lynn, on Friday, Feb. 24 at 10 a.m., to which relatives and friends are invited to attend. Burial will follow in Pine Grove Cemetery. Visiting hours are on Thursday, Feb. 23, from 4-8 p.m. Please make memorial donations in Ron’s memory to The Baker Children’s Educational Fund c/o Colleen Baker, 15 Addison Ave., Lynn, MA 01902. Guest book is available at Parkermemorialfuneralhome.com.

Frederick L. Gaudet, 79

PEABODY — Mr. Frederick L. Gaudet, 79 years, of Peabody, and formerly of Lynn and Woburn, died Thursday in a local nursing home after a long illness.

He was born in Cambridge, the son of the late William and Dorothy (Gunn) Gaudet. Though he was raised and educated in Billerica, he lived in Woburn and Lynn for most of his adult life.

Mr. Gaudet was employed as a sheet metal worker in the heating, ventilation and air conditioning field. He enjoyed a quiet retirement with friends and family and occasional trips to Foxwoods and playing Keno.

He is survived by his daughter, Christine Gaudet of Lynn; his longtime cherished friend, Jacqueline (Costello) Day of Lynn; and his brother, George “Ed” Gaudet of Burlington. He also leaves behind numerous nieces and nephews. He is the brother of the late William Gaudet, Ann Conlon and Dorothy McIntosh.

Service information: His funeral will be held on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017 with graveside services at 11 a.m. in the Fox Hill Cemetery, 130 Andover Road, Billerica. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. Visiting hours are on Friday, Feb. 24, 2017 from 5-9 p.m. at the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Route 129), Lynn. Donations may be made to the Compassionate Care Hospice, 800 West Cummings Park, Suite 3400, Woburn, MA 01801. Directions and guestbook at Solimine.com.

Peabody’s Buonopane enjoys baseball in the sun

COURTESY PHOTO BY ANDY MENG/STAGESHOT PHOTOGRAPHY
Tom Buonopane, a Peabody native and St. John’s Prep alum, is off to a strong start at Eckerd this season. 

By JOSHUA KUMMINS

While New Englanders were forced to shovel snow several times in recent weeks, Peabody native Tom Buonopane is happy to have had nothing to do with that.

At Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Fla., and elsewhere around the powerful Division II Sunshine State Conference (SSC), there are few days off from baseball. And, the junior center fielder ― who attended St. John’s Prep and played his first college season at the University of Rhode Island ― isn’t complaining.

“It’s a blessing to be down here playing every single day,” Buonopane said. “At URI, we were shoveling snow off the field to get our first game in, but here we’ve practiced every single day and throughout the fall and winter.

“Just playing the game you love every single day with the brothers next to you is really fun.”

Buonopane’s second season as a Triton is off to a great start. He’s gone 11-for-33 through the first nine games with six runs scored and five RBI.

Eckerd is just 3-6 on the year, but Buonopane has hit safely in all but one game thus far, has already managed three multi-hit efforts and has driven in four runs over the last three outings, including one in an 8-5 win over Ave Maria last Wednesday.

As SSC play does not begin until a three-game series against reigning national champion Nova Southeastern over the weekend, this time of year is just about getting better.

“Each and every day, we get our individual drills in and really work on our routes to baseballs and approach at the plate,” said Buonopane. “So far, I feel like I’ve been getting better even in just the two weeks we’ve been playing. I’m feeling good and I have a positive outlook on the rest of the season.”

Buonopane, who hit .308 with three home runs and 12 RBI in 38 games last season, is one of just 10 players on Eckerd’s roster with at least junior status.

As an everyday player and now the Tritons’ starter in center field, developing a presence of leadership has been just as important as Buonopane’s positive start to the season statistically.

“We’re a pretty young team and still trying to find ourselves, so Tom has provided leadership for our team being an upperclassmen and someone who’s played every day,” Tritons head coach Josh Beauregard said. “His play so far has been really good, mixing him between the leadoff spot and the five hole to better utilize his skill set.”

Buonopane is one of four Massachusetts natives and six total New Englanders on the Eckerd roster. Also among the Tritons’ other locals is left-handed pitcher Cam Lanzilli of Stoneham, a UMass Lowell transfer who spent this past summer in Lynn with the Futures Collegiate League’s North Shore Navigators.

“Just having some guys from up north who know what I go through to try to grind and play the game we play, playing inside and hitting in the cages instead of out in the sun, it feels good,” Buonopane said. “I’m a long way from home, but having a taste of it makes you feel more comfortable because they know how much harder you have to work to get here.”

Beauregard notes that New Englanders can have an added “projectability” because of the forced break from baseball during the winter. Often, the players he recruits here are multi-sport athletes.

Still, Beauregard ― as a New Englander himself ― knows the baseball talent and high-caliber programs in this region, especially at the D-II level with the likes of Franklin Pierce and Southern New Hampshire in the Northeast-10 Conference.

“The main reason I came down to Florida is that I was tired of shoveling,” said Beauregard, who hails from Keene, N.H. “I love the mindset, the blue-collar atmosphere up there. You’re just taught to work hard and get your job done, and that’s the attitude we have too.”

Another selling point? An on-campus beach.

“I came down here at the end of my sophomore year looking for a new place to play down here,” Buonopane said. “A senior captain that year, Jimmy Gutowski took me down to the beach first, and I was sold.

“I was with my father and I told him, ‘Dad, we’ve got to make this happen.’”

Mission accomplished.

 

Names and notes

  • Lynn’s Stephen Basden was one of four Endicott College men’s basketball players in double figures Saturday in an 84-72 win over Western New England, scoring 13 points while also recording six rebounds, three assists and two steals.
  • Lynnfield’s John Festa recorded his second assist and fifth point of the season in the Amherst College men’s hockey team’s 4-1 win over Middlebury on Saturday.
  • At Saturday’s NCAA Division III New England Championships in Medford, St. Mary’s grad Andrew DiMaiti became the fourth consecutive Tufts runner to win the 600-meter title with a 1:21.25 time. The Medford native also helped the Jumbos’ 4×400-meter relay team finish fourth. Peabody native Marcus Vieira of Worcester State placed fourth in the weight throw with a distance of 17.07 meters, while Lynn’s Jalil Gibson finished 11th in the 60-meter dash, finishing in 7.16 seconds.
  • Bates College swimming captain Sara Daher of Marblehead earned five All-NESCAC honors after helping the Bobcats place in the 200-yard freestyle relay, 400 free relay, 800 free relay and 400 medley relay, while nabbing second in the 200-yard individual medley at last week’s conference championship meet.
  • Lynn’s Ashelyne Babb was the Utica College women’s basketball team’s second-leading scorer this season, averaging 12.6 points and 3.9 assists per game after a nine-point effort in Saturday’s season-ending, 56-44 win over Elmira. Her 70 steals led the Empire 8 Conference.
  • Lynn’s Cam O’Neill went 1-for-4 with a two-run single in the Holy Cross baseball team’s Sunday season opener, a 3-2 loss to Central Connecticut State.
  • Saugus’ Peter Bocchino recorded his first three hits of the season this weekend for the Bentley University baseball team, which lost twice to Rollins and once to Southern Connecticut State. He went 2-for-4 with a triple on Saturday against SCSU and drove in a run in a 7-6 setback to Rollins the following day.

Lynn’s Echevarria, Peabody’s Bettencourt earn CCC Honors

FILE PHOTO
Lynn native Marcos Echevarria named the 2016-2017 Commonwealth Coast Conference Player of the Year earlier this week. 

By KATIE MORRISON

Lynn native Marcos Echevarria was named the 2016-17 Commonwealth Coast Conference Player of the Year Monday thanks to his play with the Nichols College mens basketball team.

Echevarria finished his sophomore season as the CCC’s leading scorer, and his 23.4 points per game average makes him one of the top-10 scorers in all of Division III basketball. He hit 115 three-pointers, which leads the nation in all divisions.

He ranks second in the CCC in free-throw percentage, hitting 88 percent from the stripe. He was also the conference leader in steals with 57, averaging 2.3 steals per game, and was second in assists with 107 (4.3 assists per game). Echevarria became the 28th player in Nichols history to score his 1000th point, a mark he reached last month.

Echevarria scored 19 points and collected six assists, four steals and three rebounds in the Bisons’ 86-69 win over the University of New England to end the regular season Saturday. Echevarria led all scorers with nine first-half points. The Bisons finished 20-5 overall and 15-3 in the conference to earn a share of the CCC title.

Echevarria was named the CCC Player of the Week on two occasions this year and was the USBWA Division III National Player of the Week for the week ending Jan. 29.

Also being recognized by the CCC is Endicott men’s basketball head coach Kevin Bettencourt of Peabody.
In his third season at the helm of the Gulls’ squad, Bettencourt led his team to a 20-5 overall (15-3 CCC) record and earned a share of the CCC Regular-Season Championship. Endicott heads into the conference tournament as the league’s second-highest scoring offense (80.1 ppg), while allowing the league’s second-lowest point total on defense (68.5). Earlier this year, the Gulls received some national recognition as they entered the D3hoops.com Top-25, peaking at No. 20. Bettencourt will be looking for his third straight CCC title since taking over in 2014-15.
Also recognized were Salve Regina’s Nicholas Bates, of Danvers, who made the conference second team, and his teammate Rodney Morton, of Malden, was named to the third team.

Mayor weighs custodian transfer

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy will take the rest of the week to decide whether to transfer management of the school’s maintenance staff from City Hall to the school department.

In a drama that unfolded last week, the School Committee rejected the mayor’s request to move accountability of the school custodians from the Inspectional Services Department (ISD) to the schools by a 6-1 vote. Only the mayor, chairwoman of the committee, voted for it.

The change, which requires approval from the mayor, City Council and the Legislature, was Kennedy’s idea as a way to capture $1 million in additional school spending and avoid a state penalty. But the mayor said she needs to review the Home Rule Petition in its entirety before she makes a decision.

“I plan to take most, if not all of this week, to read through the complicated nine-page document,” she said. “I am fully committed to the move, but I want to make sure nothing has been inserted to the home rule petition before I sign it.”

The draft of the change was straightforward, the mayor said, as simple as shifting the management to the schools. But there are other questions as to who will do the hiring, scheduling and disciplining, she said.

“The devil is in the details,” she said. “I’ve heard the School Committee making comments about hiring as many as seven new people and I need to read the amendments to see how they got that number.”

A review of the document found two positions created under the new ordinance, a supervisor of school custodian and ground services and an assistant.

“My intention is to get the custodians over to the school side so there’s a net zero impact on the budgeting and not spend another dime to do the same job ISD has been doing for years,” she said.

There has been some talk by School Committee members to end the practice of privatizing afternoon janitor services that cost the city $1.5 million. If schools hire their own workers, the cost would soar to $2.8 million in salary and benefits for 40 custodians.

“I am a member of the School Committee as well, and I don’t want to see teachers laid off in order to make room for 40 new custodians.” Kennedy said. “That would be a bad move financially, I want to provide direct services to kids.”

The move was approved by the City Council last week. If the mayor fails to sign it, she could send it back to the council for amendments. While the School Committee would be asked to reconsider any changes, officially they do not have a say in the move. They can only recommend to the Lynn delegation on Beacon Hill not to support the change.

Showdown over Lynn school custodians


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

English High among life sciences grants recipients

LYNN — English High School is getting $55,000 to spur training in life sciences studies, announced Gov. Charlie Baker.

The money will help pay for programs to increase students’ science literacy, laboratory skill development, applications of technology and interest in science-related careers, according to the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center (MLSC).

The awards are part of a statewide grant round that is delivering a total of $39 million in MLSC capital grants to 14 research and educational institutions, and 49 middle and high schools.

“Our administration is proud of Massachusetts’ global leadership in the life sciences, and we are committed to advancing that standing training the next generation of entrepreneurs, and connecting residents across the state to careers,” said Baker.

English will also use the money for programs offering training in biotechnology laboratory skills to ninth grade students, including new biotechnology techniques in Introduction to Biotechnology, Honors Biotechnology, Honors Biology and AP Biology curriculums for 11th and 12th grade students.

Baker announced the grants last Thursday during an event at the Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute.

Peabody votes for 25 mph speed limit

“Massachusetts is building the nation’s most competitive economy by investing in workforce development and in the infrastructure of innovation,” said state Housing and Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash. “By building a platform for marine genomics research in Gloucester, and improving the quality of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education for students in Gloucester, Lynn and Salem, these awards will help make the North Shore a more dynamic place to live and work, and they will equip local residents with the skills needed to retain Massachusetts’ title as the most innovative state in the nation.”

Peabody votes for 25 mph speed limit

By LEAH DEARBORN

PEABODY — City Council is trying to make the roads safer by reducing the speed limit.

The council voted 5-0 at a legal affairs committee meeting Feb. 16 to amend the city’s default speed limit to 25 miles per hour. Previously, every street without a sign had a speed limit of 30 mph.

Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt Jr. characterized the change in speed as “simple and straightforward.

“There’s just too many cars going too fast on our streets,” he said.

Christopher Ryder, chief of the mayor’s staff, said residents can expect the speed limit change to go into effect sometime in the next few weeks.

Ryder said the city will advertise the change, possibly through the use of the community communication alert network.

A number of towns and cities, including Boston, have changed their default speed limits after Gov. Charlie Baker signed the Municipal Modernization Bill last year.

Before signing the bill, all speed limit changes had to be initiated through a traffic study, followed by a presentation to the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), said Bettencourt.

The mayor said the changes won’t apply to highways or roads with existing signs over 30 mph. He named Lowell, Lynnfield, Lynn and Pulaski Streets as examples.

Ward 1 Councilor Jon Turco inquired about Bartholomew Street, which has multiple speed zones.

Bettencourt said he would recommend the overall speed limit of Bartholomew Street be reduced to 25 mph.

“I have three kids, it’s certainly a concern of mine,” said Bettencourt, who emphasized that the change will target densely populated side streets.

“That’s a no-brainer. I like that idea,” said Ward 3 Councilor James Moutsoulas. “Right now, you just made that process a lot easier.”

The city will be able to increase speed limits if they need to adjust the 25 mph limit in some areas, but that process will still involve going through MassDOT.


Leah Dearborn can be reached at ldearborn@itemlive.com.

Police log: 2-21-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to the Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Raymond Bryant was arrested on warrant charges of receiving stolen property, breaking and entering daytime for a felony and breaking and entering nighttime for a felony at 3:42 p.m. Sunday.

Jennifer Echeverria, 25, of 65 Elm St., was arrested and charged with OUI liquor and leaving the scene of property damage at 4:27 a.m. Monday.

Stephen Fobert, 41, of 15 Broad St., Peabody, was arrested and charged with OUI liquor second offense, OUI drugs second offense and Class A drug possession subsequent offense at 7:40 p.m. Sunday.

Jorge Juarez, 22, of 32 Moulton St., was arrested and charged with leaving the scene of property damage, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, marked lanes violation, negligent operation of a motor vehicle and OUI liquor at 12:38 a.m. Monday.

Diego Mejia, of 61 Bloomingdale St., Chelsea, was arrested on warrant charges of three counts of unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, Class A drug possession, crosswalk violation, breaking and entering daytime for a felony, larceny by check, forgery of a check and uttering a false check at 8:47 a.m. Monday.

Tatiana Pena, 26, of 15 Lyman St., was arrested and charged with shoplifting by concealing merchandise at 3:12 p.m. Monday.

Joshua Smith, 22, of 32 Howard St., was arrested and charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, attempted murder and mayhem at 6:41 p.m. Sunday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 12:05 p.m. Sunday at 145 N Common St.; at 6:46 p.m. Sunday at 136 Myrtle St.; at 1:22 a.m. Monday at 501 Washington St.; at 3:59 a.m. Monday at 94 Hanover St.; at 7:31 a.m. Monday at 927 Western Ave.; at 10:28 a.m. Monday at Federal and Marion streets; at 1:35 p.m. Monday at Chatham and Marianna streets; at 2:30 p.m. Monda at 50 Boston St.; at 2:33 p.m. Monday at Lynn City Hall at 3 City Hall Square.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 3:49 p.m. Sunday at 43 Rockaway St.; at 11:11 a.m. Monday at Boston and Federal streets.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 6:11 p.m. Sunday at 147 Myrtle St.; at 12:06 p.m. Monday at 58 Parkland Ave.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 5:59 p.m. Sunday on Howard Street.

A report of an assault and battery at 12:37 a.m. Monday at Essex and Washington streets.

A report of an assault and battery with a dangerous weapon at 7:27 a.m. Monday on Boston Street.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle breaking and entering at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at 50 Adams St.

A report of a breaking and entering at 7:21 p.m. Sunday at 31 Broad St.; at 1:54 p.m. Monday at 16 Surfside Road.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 11:04 a.m. Sunday at 42 Market St.; at 12:51 p.m. Sunday at 26 Essex Circle; at 1:11 p.m. Sunday at 20 Essex Circle; at 1:49 p.m. Sunday at 242 Chestnut St.; at 5:52 p.m. Sunday at 26 Autumn St.; at 6:47 p.m. Sunday on Essex Circle; at 7:09 p.m. Sunday at 33 Newcastle St.; at 12:21 a.m. Monday at Club Euphoria on Union Street; at 2:25 a.m. Monday at 66 Commercial St.; at 3:50 a.m. Monday at 83 Franklin St.; at 8:59 a.m. Monday at 1 Freeman Square; at 2:56 p.m. Monday at 285 Lynn Shore Drive.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 3:46 p.m. Sunday at 590 Washington St.

Theft

A report of a robbery at 7:31 p.m. Sunday at 3 Kingsley Terrace.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 2:54 p.m. Sunday at 9 Kingswood Lane; at 8:03 a.m. Monday at 69 Gardiner St.; at 2:10 p.m. Monday at Richdale at 149 Walnut St.

Police log: 2-20-2017


MARBLEHEAD

Complaints

A caller reported kids throwing snowballs at cars from the cliff at 7:57 p.m. Sunday on Pleasant Street.


NAHANT

Arrests

Pamela E. Sprenger, 57, of 38 Irving Way, was arrested and charged with marked lanes violation, OUI drugs second offense and negligent operation of a motor vehicle at 3:35 a.m. Sunday.


PEABODY

Arrests

Michael C. Hebb, 45, of 84 Aborn St., Apt. 1201, was arrested on a warrant charge of murder at 10:41 a.m. Monday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 8:08 p.m. Sunday at 5 Granite Road.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 8:12 a.m. Monday at 629 Lowell St. and 156 Goodale St.; at 8:39 a.m. Monday at 20 Webster St. A van on its roof was reported; at 11:11 a.m. Monday at Brothers Deli at 11 Main St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 6:22 p.m. Sunday at Metro Cleaners at 43 Foster St.; at 9:41 p.m. Sunday at 28 Washington St.; at 3:07 a.m. Monday at Bella Rose Consulting at 71 Northend St.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 2:20 p.m. Sunday at 1 Ian Circle. Two cars were reportedly keyed.


SWAMPSCOTT

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 9:52 a.m. Sunday on New Ocean Street.

Living large and little in Lynn

PHOTO BY BOB ROCHE
Above, a large house sits on Lynn Shore Drive. Right, a little house on Glenwood Road.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN Are you in the “bigger is better” camp or are you more comfortable with “less is more?”

The Item searched city records and found the city’s smallest and largest single-family homes.

If you prefer a mansion, the 9,242-square-foot white Colonial overlooking the ocean at 55 Lynn Shore Drive is perfect.

Built in 1900 as a grand waterfront home, it later became a convent for the Little Sisters of the Poor. Until a few years ago, it housed Catholic Charities. The Boston Archdiocese’s social service agency used the three floors to fulfill its mission offering social service programs for people of all races, religions and ages.

In 2013, Giorgio Dicostanzo, a general contractor, bought the 24-room house for $590,000, according to city records, with plans to restore it to its original glory. The house features 18 bedrooms, 4 full and 7 half-baths on a 22,922-square-foot lot. Its assessed value is $786,600.

Four miles away, on the Peabody border, the two-room bungalow at 21 Glenwood Road offers just one bedroom and one bath. At 384 square feet, the gray shingled home could fit into the living room of the Lynn Shore palace.

Assessed at $176,700, it was purchased in 1980 by Philippe and Deborah Lambert for an undisclosed nominal price, according to the Southern Essex Registry of Deeds.

David Hughes, broker-owner of Century 21 Hughes, said anyone looking for very small or very large homes are niche buyers with very specific requirements.

The average home is 1,500 square feet, he said. If buyers want smaller, they typically choose a 1,000-square-foot ​house. For bigger residences, they top out at 3,000 square feet.

“It takes a special buyer for a house as large as the one on Lynn Shore Drive,” he said. “The buyer of a very small home, like the one on Glenwood, is a lifestyle choice where they don’t want to have a big mortgage on a bigger house.”

Eileen Spencer, an agent at Annmarie Jonah Realtors, said the majority of people seeking homes in Lynn are first time home buyers and are not looking for houses in extreme sizes. Typically, these buyers are seeking three bedrooms, 1.5 baths in a 1,500-square-foot home. Buyers who are trading up prefer something a little larger at about 2,500 square feet, she said.

“There’s been a lot of attention paid to these tiny homes on television shows,” she said. “But those are not popular in this part of the country, certainly not in Lynn.”

Despite its  “bigger is better” reputation and seemingly endless supply of McMansions, the U.S. does not have the largest average house size, according to Love Abode. That honor goes to Australia where the average house is 2,500, the U.S. is second at about 2,100 square feet while China has the smallest, at just 500 square feet.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Lynn shows solidarity when tragedy strikes

ITEM PHOTO BY KATIE MORRISON
Lynn English coach Steve Stranahan talks to his team during a timeout.

By STEVE KRAUSE

LYNNSteve Stranahan remembers being at Curry College and giving classmate Kevin Moran a hard time about being from Lynn.

That’s because all Stranahan, who grew up in Abington, knew about the city was what he’d read in the newspapers or heard from other people.

But after he got married, he relocated to Lynn. Now, he said, he couldn’t be prouder to live here.

Last year was an eye-opening experience for Stranahan. His best friend, English boys basketball coach Mike Carr, was stricken in March and was near death in April. He rallied, but medical bills were astronomical. So, a benefit was planned for Carr at the Hibernian Hall on Federal Street in July.

“Usually, you hear of something like this, and a lot of people come up to you and ask what they can do to help,” Stranahan said, “and that’s as far as it goes.

“But the response to this was just overwhelming,” he said. “It was incredible to me, the amount of people — and the wide scope of people — who came to me because they knew our relationship. It helped.

“Everybody came together,” he said. “We set up several meetings. They were widely attended. I was really moved.”

Carr, for whom Stranahan served as an assistant, was able to coach through the holidays, but his health declined after that. He went into the hospital on Martin Luther King day in January and died Jan. 27. Again, Stranahan saw the generosity and spirit of Lynners — this time in the enormous tribute the city paid to his friend, both in the overflow crowds at the wake the following Wednesday and at the funeral the next day.

“It makes me happy that I moved, and I’m proud to be a part of it,” said Stranahan. “And people who aren’t from here won’t see that, and won’t understand it.”

To say Lynn is a diverse city is putting it mildly. Contained within its seven wards and 28 precincts are both upscale enclaves, working-class neighborhoods and probably everything in between. Yet there is a commonality about being from the city that seems to transcend labels. And this shines through the most in the toughest of times.

“There’s no other community that comes together the way they do Lynn,” said St. Mary’s football coach Matt Durgin.

Last month, one day after Carr succumbed to cancer, Durgin’s sister, Michele, died in an automobile accident in Marblehead. The Durgin family went through a horrible ordeal, but didn’t go through it alone.

“The city came together in a big way,” said Durgin. “Michele loved the city of Lynn, as I do. I couldn’t live anywhere else. In a tragic situation, the support from the people in the city brought a lot of comfort to our family.”

Michele Durgin’s wake, which was supposed to last at Solimine Funeral Home on Broadway from 4 to 8 p.m. did not end until 10:20. As Matt Durgin noted, people from St. Mary’s — where Michele taught for 21 years — paid their respects, but so did coaches, educators from the Lynn school system, and, most of all, former students whom she influenced positively.

“Lynn,” said former Lynn Vocational Technical Institute director Bart Conlon “is amazing in that way.

“And not just the people who live here now, either,” he said. “There are so many people who have moved away, and when tragedy happens, they all come back.”

Conlon said that when his son, Michael, died in 1996 in an auto accident, with their daughter Michelle in the car, he and his wife, Diane, had to go to New Hampshire, where the accident occurred. By the time they got back home, it was close to 10 p.m.

“The house was filled,” Conlon said. “It was an eye-opener. People were helpful in so many ways.”

Michelle Conlon died of cancer in 2011, and again, the family was as overwhelmed by the support the people in the city provided as it was overcome by grief.

“People I hardly knew came, just to say hello, to pay their respects,” Conlon said. “They waited outside in the lines … it made you feel good that they cared enough about you and your family.”

Lynn ponders tax hike for two new schools

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Supporters are lining up on each side of what could be an expensive fight to approve a tax hike for two new schools.

So the state Office of Campaign and Political Finance (OCPF) is hosting a seminar this week on how the campaign finance law impacts ballot questions.

A special election will be held March 14 asking homeowners to pay an estimated $75 million, or $200 annually for the next 25 years on their tax bills for a pair of schools that would serve students in the Pickering Middle School district and West Lynn.

“We’re holding a workshop in Lynn because we have a sense that residents are very interested based on the calls we’ve received asking about the rules,” said Jason Tait, OCPF spokesman.

The one-hour session will be Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Room at the Lynn Police Station. Residents on both sides of the issue are invited.

If approved, a 652-student school would be built near Breeds Pond Reservoir off Parkland Avenue and a second facility to serve 1,008 students would be constructed on McManus Field on Commercial Street. Likely to be in favor of the ballot question are the city’s elected officials and the Lynn Teachers Union. In addition, parents whose children attend the so-called feeder schools can be counted on for support, say political observers.

Pickering families who send their children to the Aborn, Shoemaker, Lynn Woods and Sisson elementary schools are likely to back the question while parents of children who attend Cobbet, Connery and Washington STEM elementary schools from West Lynn are expected to back a new school on their side of the city.                                              

Opposition has emerged from Pine Hill residents who are against building the new middle school near Breeds Pond Reservoir. They have organized Protect Our Reservoir – Preserve Pine Grove Community Group. They argue the land the city plans to use to build the school was intended for use as a cemetery. They say the city should find an alternative site and have threatened a lawsuit.

Tait said the seminar will be taught in two sections. One will focus on ballot question committees, the organizations that raise and spend money to support or oppose the question. The second part will review the ground rules for public employees, the use of public buildings and taxpayer funds.  

“We stress that public employees are prohibited from raising money for ballot questions,” Tait said. “Firefighters and  teachers, for example, are prohibited and no tax money can be used to pay for the campaign.”

Elected officials are free to solicit funds for the cause and they often promote fundraising for ballot questions, he said.  

The vote represents the first time Lynn residents have been asked to approve a tax hike in the city’s history.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Police log: 2-20-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to the Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Benjamin Bowden, of 116 New Park St., was arrested on a warrant at 8:48 a.m. Saturday.

Edin DeLeon, of 174 Broadway, was arrested and charged with property destruction and on a warrant at 7:29 p.m. Saturday.

Christian Kendal, of 37 Adams St., was arrested on a warrant at 12:16 a.m. on Saturday.

Joseph LeClerc of Gloucester was arrested on a warrant at 12:49 a.m. on Saturday.

Chelcie McDade, of 90 Aborn St., Peabody, was arrested on a warrant at 10:10 a.m. on Friday.

Bonnie Montanez, of Lowell, was arrested on a warrant at 4:36 p.m. on Saturday.

David Pezzulo, 59, of 11 Brook St., Salem, was arrested and charged with receiving a stolen motor vehicle at 11:17 a.m. on Sunday.

Gary Platt, of 175 Fayette St., was arrested on a warrant at 10:31 a.m. on Sunday.

Joseph Stapf, of Litchfield, was arrested on a warrant at 2:46 a.m. on Saturday.

Joseph Vincent, 27, of Gloucester was arrested and charged with Class E drug possession at 12:47 a.m. on Saturday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit-and-run at 22 Barrett St. on Friday at 3:32 a.m.; a report of an accident at Stanwood Street and Western Avenue on Friday at 7:47 a.m.; at Newhall and Sagamore streets on Friday at 7:58 a.m.; at 25 Pleasant St. on Friday at 8:21 a.m.; at Broad and Washington streets on Friday at 11:07 a.m.; at Eastern Avenue and Ocean Street on Friday at 11:24 a.m.; at Boston and Moulton streets on Friday at 11:32 a.m.; at Liberty and Washington streets on Friday at 11:40 a.m.; at 48 Hillside Ave. on Friday at 11:49 a.m.; at 79 North Common St. on Friday at 2:42 p.m.; with injury at 150 Essex St. on Friday at 5:29 p.m.; at 35 Washington St. on Friday at 6:09 p.m.; at 126 Hamilton Ave. on Friday at 6:49 p.m.; at Maple Street and Western Avenue on Saturday at 12:14 p.m.; at 9 Union St. on Saturday at 12:32 p.m.; at 969 Western Ave. on Saturday at 12:33 p.m.; at 234 Lynnfield St. on Saturday at 1:10 p.m.; hit-and-run reported at Chatham Street and Williams Avenue on Saturday at 7:02 p.m.; at Chestnut Street and Chestnut Terrace on Saturday at 8:42 p.m.; with injury at Bennett and Orchard streets on Saturday at 9:59 p.m.; a hit-and-run at 123 Hamilton Avenue on Sunday at 6:49 a.m.; at 32 Chestnut St. on Sunday at 8:03 a.m.; at Maple Street and Western Avenue on Sunday at 10:40 a.m.

Assaults

A report of an assault and battery at 300 Washington St. on Friday at 5:04 p.m.

Complaints

A disturbance was reported at Commercial and Summer streets on Friday at 1:11 a.m.

A disturbance was reported at 9 Surfside Road on Friday at 2:25 a.m.

A disturbance was reported at 80 Sagamore St. on Friday at 12:01 p.m.

A missing person report was filed from 9 Devlin Way on Friday at 1:31 p.m.

A disturbance was reported at 14 Rock Avenue on Friday at 3:45 p.m.

A disturbance was reported at 501 Washington St. on Friday at 4:13 p.m.

A noise complaint was reported at 42 Rockingham St. on Saturday at 12:25 a.m.

A noise complaint was reported at 32 Nelson St. on Saturday at 12:33 a.m.

A report of an uninvited guest was lodged at 116 New Park St. on Saturday at 8:12 a.m.

A report of an uninvited guest was lodged at 174 Broadway on Saturday at 6:47 p.m.

A noise complaint was reported at 224A Washington St. on Saturday at 10:01 p.m.

Theft

A larceny was reported at 95 Tremont St. on Friday at 10:37 a.m.; at 96 Laurel St. on Friday at 8:11 p.m.; at 138 South Common St. on Saturday at 3:11 p.m.; a motor vehicle theft was reported on Cypress Place on Saturday at 9:31 p.m. and a motor vehicle theft was reported at 111 Munroe St. on Sunday at 12:10 a.m.

Vandalism

Vandalism was reported at 103 Broad St. on Friday at 9:05 p.m.

MARBLEHEAD

Complaints

Police responded to a report of an underage party on Ware Lane at 7:41 p.m. on Friday.

PEABODY

Arrests

Jeffrey Lopez, 27, of 119 Lewis St., Lynn, was arrested and charged with operating after license revoked at 4:29 p.m. on Friday.

Lynda Esquilin, 26 of 119 Lewis St., Lynn, was arrested on a warrant at 4:29 p.m. on Friday.

Jody Crockett, 46, of Wakefield, was arrested and charged with operating after suspension at 5:07 p.m. on Saturday.

Ujwal Dhungel, 31, of Arlington, was arrested and charged with shoplifting over $100 at 5:40 p.m. on Saturday.

Carlos Bastos, 41, of Everett, was arrested and charged with unlicensed motor vehicle operation at 9:56 p.m. on Saturday.

Accidents

A hit-and-run was reported at 210 Andover St. at 6:02 p.m. on Friday; a police officer reported minor damage to a cruiser at 637 Lowell St. at 9:19 a.m. on Saturday; hit-and-run at 310 Lowell St. at 9:50 a.m. on Saturday; hit-and-run at 210 Andover St. at 10:21 a.m. on Saturday; hit-and-run at 373 Lowell St. at 7:39 p.m. on Saturday; at 163 Washington St. at 11:36 a.m. on Sunday.

Complaints

A citation was issued to a Fountain Street resident for one unvaccinated and two unlicensed dogs at 2:07 p.m. on Saturday.

A homeowner requested animal control remove a raccoon at 234 Lynn St. at 12:20 p.m. on Saturday.

Police responded to a loud music report at 49 Pierpont St. at 12:05 p.m. on Sunday.

St. Mary’s girls win first Classic game

PHOTO BY BOB ROCHE
Olivia Nazaire drives past Coyle-Cassidy’s Jenna Piatelli for a basket during Sunday’s Spartan Classic.

By SCOT COOPER

LYNN —  If you’re going to host a tournament you might as well win it.

Junior Olivia Nazaire made sure her St. Mary’s Spartans reached the finals of the Spartan Classic, pushing her team past Coyle-Cassidy Sunday night 46-35.

Spartans coach Jeff Newhall said that Nazaire’s 23 points were big for his team, but a lot of other players contributed too.

“It’s our tournament, we’re very proud of it, and we’re certainly in it to win it,” Newhall said. “Olivia did a great job, our whole forward line did a great job on their bigs, getting them all to foul out by the fourth quarter.”

“Coyle-Cassidy (15-3) has an excellent team, they have two losses to Bishop Feehan, a top team in the state, so to beat them is a nice accomplishment for our team,” Newhall said. “And it was a team effort tonight certainly.”

Newhall said that after a tough game with Bishop Fenwick Friday, it was good to get a boost of energy by scoring first against the Warriors. Nazaire made a free throw and a bucket, and the Spartans were ahead early on, 4-3.

The Warriors battled back and took a 9-8 lead behind buckets by their high scorer, sophomore Rachael Johnson. St. Mary’s was cold to start the second quarter, but eventually heated up to take a 21-15 lead into the locker room at halftime. Amanda Idusuyi helped push St. Mary’s back on top with five points in the second quarter to go with Nazaire’s offense.

Coyle-Cassidy wouldn’t go away in the third quarter and Johnson had help from Kaylee Haynes, and the Warriors climbed all the way back to take a two-point lead after three quarters, 30-28.

Nazaire came right out fast in the fourth, scoring six straight points to put her team on top for good, 34-30, with 7:20 left in the fourth quarter. The junior from Peabody said that her team had to put the hammer down once they got the lead back in the fourth quarter.

“We told everyone to push it and keep pushing it and pushing it in the fourth quarter,” Nazaire said. “Once we got the lead we wanted to just keep pushing them back, and we did because so many girls on the team did a great job for us.”

Coyle-Cassidy got as close as 42-35 on a three pointer by Abbie Kurtzer, but Mia Nowicki and Nazaire sank free throws to ice the 11-point win.

Warriors’ coach Michael O’Brien said it was tough to keep up with the Spartans after all his bigs fouled out by the fourth quarter.

“We’re a young tram, no seniors, we got into foul trouble, we lost some key players and couldn’t recover,” O’Brien said. “We played hard, St. Mary’s is a very good team, we’re 15-3 and we’ll take where we are now and go forward from there.”

The Spartans will be looking for a fifth straight Spartan Classic title Monday night at 7 p.m. against Rockland. The Bulldogs beat Latin Academy to earn a spot in the title game with St. Mary’s.

Nazaire led all scorers with 23 points; Johnson was high scorer for the Warriors with 15. For the winners, Temi Felayi chipped in with eight points, Mia Nowicki had 5, Idusuyi had five, Gabriela Torres had three and Ashley Sullivan hit a free throw.

Before the game seniors Mia Nowicki, Idusuyi Felayi and their parents were honored on Senior Night.

 

Gertraude Hill, 72

LYNN — Gertraude “Trudy” (Piesker) Hill, age 72, of Lynn, died Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, at a local nursing home, following a lengthy illness. She was the wife of David G. Hill, and the daughter of the late Rudolf and Liesel (Herzog) Piesker. Born in Cottbus, East Germany, Trudy was raised in Homberg, Efze, West Germany. She was educated in early childhood education and nursing in Frankford and Fritzlar, Germany. She worked as a faculty assistant for Harvard Business School for many years and as a soloist and choir director at Holy Family Church in Lynn for 16 years as well as St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Nahant from 1994-2012. Trudy loved music and singing. She was philanthropic and generous to charities. Also Trudy Hill was well known in the North Shore and Greater Boston musical community. Ms. Hill began her musical career in Germany where she performed in operas and oratorios. Her most beloved musical experience was with the Paul Madore Chorale as a soprano Soloist,

She was coached by Allan Rogers and Paul Madore in her subsequent years. She teamed up with her best friend, Mary Pelletier, to arrange the Summer Singing, giving local artists a chance to be known in the musical community and to create an awareness to the continuance of the Performing Arts. As part of her musical experience she teamed up with Maria Dè Stefano, the ultimate alto, and a life-long team they formed. Don Wilkerson, whose voice Trudy loved, was her musical partner for many years and a lifelong friendship developed.

The Northshore Philharmonic, Symphony by the Sea, Cape Ann Chamber Orchestra, the Brookline Symphony, the Melrose Symphony, the Arlington Belmont Chorale, the Bedford Chorale and the Concert Singers of Greater Lynn all gave richness to her musical life. It was at the core of her existence with her husband David, she enjoyed extensive traveling.

Besides her loving husband David of almost 30 years, she is survived by her four children Caroline Hill of Biddeford, Maine, Julie Hope and her husband Zachary of Lynn, Daniel Hill and his partner Jennifer Swafford of Lynn and Ryan Hill of Lynn, her three grandchildren, Kelsey Kamerick, Christina Hope and Nathan Hill, and her sister Anneliese Collins of Newport News, Va. She also leaves her two nieces Vicky and Karen Collins, her brother-in-law David Butler and his wife Miriam of Boxford, her sister-in-law Joan Hutchinson and her husband Jeff of Middletown, N.Y. and a dear, longtime friend, Mary Pelletier of Salem. Another dear friend was June Robinson, a member of Our Lady of the Assumption Choir, who was a spiritual supporter as well as a musical partner. She was preceded in death by her brother-in-law Charles Collins.

Service information: Her funeral will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, from the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Rt. 129) Lynn at 9 a.m., followed by a funeral Mass at Our Lady of the Assumption Church, Lynnfield at 10 a.m. Interment will be in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Lynn. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. Visiting hours will be Tuesday from 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 480 Pleasant St., Watertown, MA 02472. Directions and guestbook at Solimine.com.

Robert P. Doyle, 70

LYNN — Robert P. Doyle, age 70, of Lynn, died Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, at Beverly Hospital, after being stricken suddenly. He was the husband of the late Rosalie (Campbell) Doyle, the father of the late John R. Doyle, and the son of the late Patrick “Paddy” and Freda (Greenhow) Doyle.

Born in Deptford, Sunderland, England, he has lived in Lynn for 45 years. He was educated in Sunderland schools, and was the owner and operator of R.P. Doyle and Sons, working in tiling and plastering in the Lynn area for many years. The last eight years Robert was working at Hannah Village in Beverly in maintenance. In his younger years, he was a member of England’s Merchant Marines. He enjoyed bowling, and watching and playing soccer, as well as his work.

He is survived by his son Patrick A. Doyle and his wife Kristine (Magner) Doyle of Lynn, his grandson John Doyle, his brothers, Paddy Doyle and his wife Suzanne of Sunderland, Martin Doyle and his wife Iris of Sunderland, Kevin Doyle and his wife Angela of Sunderland and Fred Doyle and his wife Diane of Sunderland, his sister Freda Hackett and her husband Ray of Sunderland, several nieces and nephews and a brother-in-law John Campbell of Lynn.

Service information: His funeral will be held on Thursday in the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Rt. 129) Lynn at 10 a.m. Visiting hours will be Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited. Interment in Pine Grove Cemetery, Lynn, will be at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Massachusetts Organ Bank, 60 1st Ave., Waltham, MA 02451. Directions and guestbook Solimine.com.

Pasquina Biasetti

LYNN — Pasquina “Pat” Biasetti, of Lynn, died Saturday Feb. 18, 2017, at Beverly Hospital, surrounded by her loving family.

A lifelong resident of Lynn, Pat was the daughter of the late Achille and Florence (DiJustino) Biasetti. She attended Lynn Schools and was a graduate of Lynn English High School.

She is survived by many loving nieces, nephews, grandnieces, grandnephews, and great-grandnieces, and great-grandnephews. She was the sister of the late Antonio and Enrico Biasetti.

Service information: At her request, funeral services under the direction of the SOLIMINE Funeral Home 426 Broadway (Rt. 129), Lynn, are private. In lieu of flowers please make a donation in her memory to a charity of your choice. Guestbook at Solimine.com.

Linda M. McCormick, 65

LYNN — Linda M. McCormick, 65, of Lynn, died Feb. 17, 2017, after many months of illness. She was the mother of Tracy Brown of Lynn and her husband Roberto of Lawrence, Joshua Meldrum and his wife Amber of Olivebridge, N.Y., and Kevin Meldrum and his wife Elizabeth of Sterling, Mass.

Service information: A memorial service will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday, March 17, 2017, at SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Rt. 129) Lynn. Visiting hours will follow the service from 4-8 p.m. For complete obituary and online guestbook please visit Solimine.com.

Man leads police on North Shore chase

SAUGUS—A Newburyport man was arrested after leading police on a chase through three towns on Saturday afternoon, while hitting several parked cars in the process.

Shortly before 2 p.m., State Police stopped Stephen Staffiery, 48, the driver of a 1998 Infinity QX4, on the Lynnway for motor vehicle violations. During the traffic stop, Staffiery ran away, before eventually getting back into his vehicle and taking off, state police said.

Transit Police attempted to pull over the vehicle on Route 1A in Revere, but Staffiery didn’t stop. The Infinity made its way onto Revere Street, and while continuing to evade police, Staffiery struck one vehicle, before fleeing onto Route 60 westbound, where he struck two more cars. The crashes didn’t result in any injuries, state police said.

The chase continued, as the Infinity entered Copeland Circle, at the intersection of Route 1. Staffiery left the highway at the Salem Street area in North Revere, and fled into a Saugus residential area. He pulled over on Dale Street in Saugus and ran away through backyards, state police said.

Transit, Revere and Saugus police ran after Staffiery, and after a brief struggle, he was arrested on 16 charges.

  • Equipment violation
  • Attaching plates
  • Unregistered motor vehicle
  • Uninsured motor vehicle
  • Failure to stop for police
  • Operating on a suspended/revoked license
  • Speeding
  • Disorderly conduct
  • Negligent operation of a motor vehicle
  • Leaving the scene of a property damage crash
  • Resisting arrest
  • Receiving stolen property
  • OUI drugs
  • Heroin possession
  • Possession of a burglarious instrument
  • Fugitive from justice warrant out of New Hampshire

Staffiery is scheduled to be arraigned in Lynn District Court on Tuesday.

Scott H. Robertson, 46

SOMERSWORTH, N.H. — Scott Howard Robertson, age 46, of Somersworth, N.H., formerly of Plymouth, died suddenly at Wentworth Douglass Hospital, Dover, N.H., on Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017.

Born in Lynn, Scott was the son of Betty Jane Curran of Peoria, Ariz., and George R. Robertson and his wife Barbara of Stoneham. He was raised in Swampscott and was a graduate of Swampscott High School. Prior to moving to Somersworth seven years ago, he had lived in Plymouth with his family for many years.

Scott had worked as a painter for C&R Painting in Somersworth. He was an avid fisherman and enjoyed spending time with his children.

In addition to his parents, he is survived by his children, Lillian and Boston Robertson of Plymouth; his brother, Glenn T. Robertson of Lynn; his former wife, Erin Robertson of Plymouth; his partner, Krista Brown and her family, of Somersworth, and many nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles.

Service information: A memorial service will be held on Monday at 7 p.m. in the SOLIMINE Funeral Home, 426 Broadway (Route 129), Lynn. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend. Memorial visitation Monday from 4-7 p.m. Directions and guestbook at www.solimine.com.

 

CFO accuses school committee of ‘fuzzy math’

By THOMAS GRILLO and BRIDGET TURCOTTE 

LYNN  — One day after the School Committee overwhelmingly rejected a move to transfer management of the school’s maintenance staff from Inspectional Services to the school department because of the costs, the city’s chief financial officer blasted the panel’s fuzzy math.

“There was a lot of bad information spewed by the School Committee Thursday night,” said Peter Caron. “If the schools take over custodial operations as they exist today, the only cost to them is $1 million in health insurance. All the other talk about it costing another million here and another million there is baloney.”

The controversy began last month when in an attempt to capture $1 million in additional school spending and avoid a state penalty, Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy engineered a plan to transfer supervision of school custodians from City Hall to the school department. Earlier this week, the city council voted unanimously for the change.

But in a 6-1 vote Thursday, the School Committee rejected the home rule petition that would make the transfer a reality. The panel asked the city’s Beacon Hill delegation to deep six the proposal when it reaches the State House. Only the mayor, chairman of the school committee, voted for the change.

“There are far too too many questions for us to support this change,” said Patricia Capano, a School Committee member. “We still don’t know what it will cost us, we want answers. Can we afford it without depleting our budget? It would be shortsighted.”

Showdown over Lynn school custodians

State Rep. Daniel Cahill (D-Lynn), who also serves as a City Councilor at-Large, supported the measure at the council meeting.

“I hopes the issues get resolved in a way that benefits everyone in the city,” he said.

State Rep. Brendan Crighton (D-Lynn) said he will wait to see the home rule petition arrives on Beacon Hill before he makes a decision on how to vote.

Sen. Thomas M. McGee (D-Lynn), through a spokeswoman, did not respond to an email seeking comment.

Michael Donovan, ISD director, said half of his $14 million budget pays the salaries for 57 custodians, a dozen maintenance workers as well as for supplies and maintenance.

Caron insists that portion of ISD’s budget, or $7 million, would go to the schools, and it will not cost the School Committee a dime more to do the same job.

Still, Capano said she has no idea what it costs for the afternoon shift of custodians that are privatized. She wanted to know how much it would be for the schools to hire their own custodial staff.

“We want to make an intelligent comparison if it would benefit the citizens of Lynn to have 40 new employees, but can we afford it?” she said.

Donovan said the cost of the private company for the p.m. shift is $1.5 million. But it would increase to $2.8 million in salary and benefits if the schools hire their own workers.

But Caron insists such an added expenditure is unnecessary.

“If they choose to fire the private company and hire new custodians, that’s on them,” he said. “But if they continue to use the private afternoon service, I would take the cash out of ISD’s budget and put it into the school budget. The net result is zero extra costs for the schools.”

Technically, the School Committee has no say in the transfer. They can only make a recommendation.

The mayor has until Thursday to decide whether to sign the home rule petition request and send it along to the State House.

Kennedy could not immediately be reached for comment.

Despite the custodian transfer, the city is still dealing with other school spending issues. Caron reported a clerical error that resulted in a significant underfunding to the schools of about $1.6 million.  He anticipates a similar shortfall next year.

The health insurance portion of the net school formula was miscalculated using a head-count method, he said which only includes individual health insurance plans, not the added costs of covering families.

“I’ve recommended to the mayor that the city seriously consider moving away from a self-insured plan to a premium-based plan,” he said. “We would know what the cost would be for each employee every year. We would know exactly how much money we would expect for insurance costs for the coming year.”

Of the $8.9 million in debt the city is committed to repaying in a four year period, Caron said. About $900,000 has been repaid, leaving two years to repay $8 million, he added.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.comBridget Turcotte can be reached at bturcotte@itemlive.com.

Police log: 2-18-2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Dario Mercedes, 59, of 7 Willow St. in Lynn was arrested on protective custody at 2:39 p.m. Thursday.

Octavio Sanabria was arrested on a warrant charge of parole or probation violation at 4:17 p.m. Thursday.

Donnell Skeen, 35, of 170 S. Common St. was arrested on a warrant charge of Class B drug distribution at 7:00 p.m. He was charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, a straight warrant and an unregistered motor vehicle.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 7:55 a.m. Thursday at 64 Gardiner St.; at 8:07 a.m. Thursday at Goodridge Street; at 8:50 a.m. Thursday at 175 Walnut St.; at 10:32 a.m. Thursday at 52 Franklin St.; at 10:59 a.m. Thursday at 59 N. Franklin St.; at 1:51 p.m. Thursday at Eastern and Glenwood Street; at 2:42 p.m. Thursday at 77 New Park St.; at 4:22 p.m. Thursday at 8 S. Common St.; at 6:22 p.m. Thursday at 86 Boston St.; at 7:47 a.m. Friday at Stanwood Street and Western Ave.; at 7:58 a.m. Friday at Newhall and Sagamore streets; at 8:21 a.m.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with a personal injury at 7:28 a.m. Thursday at Boston and Cedar streets.

A report of police motor vehicle accident at 11:15 a.m. Thursday at Hamilton and Lawton avenues.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run at 8:35 p.m. Thursday at 15 Pond St.; at 3:32 a.m. Friday at 22 Barrett St. #3; at 6:30 a.m. Friday at 622 Eastern Ave.

Breaking and Entering

A report of breaking and entering at 1:31 a.m. at 10 Grover St. Thursday.

A report of past breaking and entering of a motor vehicle at 5:38 p.m. at 17 W. Baltimore St. #3; at 6:57 p.m. at 186 Market St.; at 11:31 p.m. at 50 Boston St.  

Complaints

A report of an unwanted guest at 14 a.m. at 2 Rogers Ave.

A report of a disturbance at 133 Chestnut St. #2R at 1:28 a.m. Thursday; at 7:39 a.m. at 9 S. Elm St. Thursday; at 1:48 Thursday at 34 Hood St.; at 2:02 p.m. at 378 Chestnut St. #1;  at 2:15 p.m. Thursday at 39 Buffum St.; at 3:21 p.m. Thursday 36 Flint St.; at 3:36 p.m. Thursday at 50 Central Ave.; at 3:48 p.m. Thursday at 20 Wheeler St.; at 5:26 p.m. Thursday at 126 Union St. #17; at 6:09 p.m. Thursday at 366 Western Ave. #3; at 6:27 p.m. Thursday at 50 Central Ave.; at 8:28 p.m. Thursday at 10 High Rock St.; at 11:58 Thursday at 501 Washington St. #311; at 1:11 a.m. Friday at Commercial and Summer streets; at 2:25 a.m. Friday at 9 Surfside Road.

Theft

A report of a scam at 2:06 p.m. Thursday at 9 Surfside Road #9.

A report of a motor vehicle theft at 2:49 p.m. at 725 Western Ave.

A report of larceny at 3:29 p.m. at 60 Granite St.

Police log: 2-17-2017


PEABODY

Arrests

Jason M. Modugno, 43, of 117 Elliot St. #1 in Beverly was arrested at 3:42 p.m. Thursday for concealing over $100 worth of shoplifted merchandise.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 6:25 a.m. Thursday at 201S Andover St.; at 11:50 Thursday at 2 Johnson Ave. and 82 Lynnfield St.; at 12:59 a.m. Thursday Sewall Street; at 2:42 p.m. Thursday at 83 Margin St.; at 3:42 p.m. Thursday at 309 Lowell St. and 2 Northshore Road; at 11:40 p.m. Thursday at Centennial Drive.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with injuries at 7:05 a.m. Thursday at 52 Warren and 70 Endicott streets.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a past breaking and entering at 8:33 p.m. Thursday at 6 Dearborn Road.


REVERE

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 8:18 a.m. at Goldie Street; at 10:31 a.m. Thursday at Squire Road; at 11:36 a.m. at Broadway.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run at 2:58 p.m. Thursday at Sigourney Street and Squire Road.

Assault

A report of an assault at 8:31 a.m. Thursday at Thurlow Ave.

Breaking and Entering

A report of an attempted breaking and entering at 10:36 p.m. Thursday at Shirley Ave.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 1:24 a.m. Thursday at Ocean Ave.; at 11:38 a.m. Thursday at Sears Street; at 3:50 p.m. Thursday at Reservoir Ave.; at 6:38 p.m. Thursday at Campbell Ave.

A report of a complaint at 8:40 a.m. Thursday at Bell Circle; at 10:35 a.m. Thursday at Squire Road; at 5:57 p.m. Thursday at Revere Street; at 7:40 p.m. Thursday at Lee Burbank Highway.

Theft

A report of larceny, forgery or fraud at 1:33 p.m. Thursday at Gelndale Street.

A report of larceny at 7:58 p.m. Thursday at Garfield Ave.


SAUGUS

Accidents

A report by a walk-in of a past motor vehicle accident at 4:01 p.m. Thursday.

Complaints

A report of large pothole at 2:38 p.m. Thursday at 213 Walnut St. Department of public works will put a barrel over the hole.

Theft

A report of shoplifting at 4:46 p.m. Thursday at 1201 Broadway. An employee reported roughly $4,000 in merchandise was stolen.