Lynn Memorial Auditorium

Darlene Love at the Lynn Auditorium

Sponsored by the Lynn Memorial Auditorium

May 6, 2017

DOORS 5:30 PM | SHOW 7:00 PM

Come see Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and Oscar winner Darlene Love at the beautiful Lynn Auditorium on May 6.  Darlene continues to captivate audiences worldwide with hits like He’s A Rebel, The Boy I’m Gonna Marry, Wait ‘Til My Bobby Gets Home, He’s Sure the Boy I Love, and Christmas Baby Please Come Home.

Rolling Stone Magazine proclaimed Darlene Love to be “one of the greatest singers of all time,” and that certainly rings true, but perhaps Paul Shaffer says it even more concisely: “Darlene Love is Rock ‘n’ Roll!”

lynnauditorium.com

For Tickets | 781-599-SHOW or come to Lynn Auditorium Box Office during normal business hours. Tickets also available at TicketMaster.

The Classic Rock Show hits Lynn this Spring

Sponsored by the Lynn Memorial Auditorium

The Classic Rock Show’ hits North America for the first time in Spring 2017 to deliver  a brand new show, the ‘A-Z of Rock’.
Anthem after anthem, riff after riff, power chord after power chord – ‘The Classic Rock Show’ takes you on a musical journey through two and a half hours of foot-stomping fun, culminating in a show-stopping guitar duel that is definitely not to be missed.

Performing the greatest songs from right across the Alphabet of Rock, The Classic Rock Show’s world class band powers through Classic Rock’s finest moments, from AC/DC and Aerosmith to Eric Clapton, The Eagles, ELO, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Meatloaf and Queen to The WhoZeppelin, ZZ Top and everything in between, performed with note-for-note precision that truly brings the original iconic and era defining recordings back to life on stage, with a huge sound and light show to match plus much, much more!
A gem of a rock show – sore throat guaranteed!

March 2, 2017

DOORS 6:30 PM | SHOW 8:00 PM

http://www.lynnauditorium.com

Box office:  ‎ (781) 581-2971

For more information on the Classic Rock Show please visit their website, Facebook or You Tube Channel links below:

http://www.theclassicrockshow.com/
http://www.facebook.com/#!/tcrshow
http://www.youtube.com/user/ClassicRockShowUK

 

 

Lynn officials shop New York for a song

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — If Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy gets her wish, Barry Manilow, Huey Lewis and the News and a soul jam by the Chi-Lites, the Manhattans and the Stylistics will come to the Lynn Memorial Auditorium.   

Kennedy, James Marsh, the city’s community development director, and Henry Ryan, who helps book acts for the 2,200-seat hall, attended the Association of Performing Arts Presenters in New York last weekend. The goal was to meet with as many performers’ agents as possible.

“We went band shopping,” said Kennedy. “We’re looking for acts to bring to the Lynn Auditorium for this year and next. We would like to get away from doing just classic rock which has been our wheelhouse.”

Nahant links new look to old golf club

Their mission was to find country and other acts. While no deals have been signed yet, they are considering the Oak Ridge Boys and Hank Williams Jr. But they also talked with agents for indie-rockers Mumford & Sons and Death Cab for Cutie to see if there might be possibilities to break in some newer acts.

The trio joined more than 45,000 people from around the globe to access thousands of artists of all disciplines and genres.

Kennedy said when she was elected eight years ago, the city booked just three shows a year, acts such as Peter Paul & Mary and the Doodlebops, a children’s show, not major attractions.

“I am the mayor that took the auditorium to becoming a major regional venue,” she said. “I brought in air conditioning so we could sustain it and go year round with it, brought in a professional bartending and security service and signed a contract with Ticketmaster so we would have a bigger presence.”

The goal, she said, is not just to make money, it’s to bring people to Lynn.

“The income is secondary,” Kennedy said. “We want to attract people to eat at a downtown restaurant and have a drink after the show so people will get an improved perception of Lynn.”

She credited Jamie Marsh, who also books the acts, with being responsible for renovations to the auditorium. She said Henry Ryan, who had been working as a City Hall custodian, was put to work also booking acts because he had experience arranging shows in Argentina.

“It was a great 24 hours and we should see some great results,” Kennedy said.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

The Lynn Auditorium presents: Don White in Concert November 26

SPONSORED BY THE LYNN MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM.

2nd Annual Don White and Friends Concert

November 26th

DOORS 5:30 PM | SHOW 7:00 PM

http://www.lynnauditorium.com

Box office:  ‎ (781) 581-2971

Tickets are still available to see this local legend and company perform live!

Also, available through  Ticketmaster.

 

Were prog rock icons great? Yes!

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Jon Davison performs in Yes during the Yes – The Album Series concert at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium on Thursday.

BY BILL BROTHERTON

LYNN — The death of founding bassist Chris Squire last year means there are no original members in the current touring band of progressive rock titans Yes.

Jon Anderson seems content to work with Jean Luc Ponty and focus on the upcoming “An Evening of Yes Music & More” tour with Trevor Rabin and Rick Wakeman (at Boston’s Wang Theater on Oct. 19).

To further complicate matters, longtime drummer Alan White, who joined in 1972, is recuperating from recent back surgery and had to sit out Thursday night’s show at Lynn Memorial Auditorium.

Steve Howe, of YES, jams on the guitar during the YES - The Album Series concert at Lynn Memorial Auditorium on Thursday. shasak | Item Live

Steve Howe, of Yes, jams on the guitar during the Yes – The Album Series concert at Lynn Memorial Auditorium on Thursday.

So, how did the lineup of Steve Howe (guitars), Geoff Downes (keyboards), Billy Sherwood (bass), Jay Schellen (drums) and Jon Davison (vocals) fare? Pretty darn well, thank you very much.

But this was truly a show for Yes die-hards. Marginal fans who went expecting to hear “Owner of a Lonely Heart” — a turgid pile of you know what IMHO — and other radio-friendly tunes were probably ready to take poison about halfway through the close-to-25-minute set-ending “Ritual (Nous Sommes du Soleil).”

This was also the hardest rocking, aggressive-sounding Yes show I’ve seen in a long time. The band is on the road performing the 1980 album “Drama” in its entirety, sides 1 and 4 of 1973’s  bombastic, fantastic opus “Tales from Topographic Oceans” and a handful of greatest “hits.”

The stage was jam-packed with instruments and equipment. The space allotted for Downes’ keyboards was larger than my first apartment.

The six songs from the hard-rocking “Drama” kicked things off. Howe was on fire from the start, the menacing “Machine Messiah,” to the beautiful acoustic solo during “Leaves of Green.” He was a man possessed. He came to play, and drummer Schellen pushed him all night.

Vocalist Davison sounds so much like Anderson it’s eerie. He hits high notes that only dogs can hear; his tighty-whities must’ve been particularly tight. He shined on “Into the Lens” and fan favorites “I’ve Seen All Good People” and “Siberian Khatru,” which revved up the crowd even more before a 20-minute interval (that’s Brit-speak for intermission).

It’s a shame White missed the gig, because the ambitious “Topographic Oceans” was the first Yes album he played on. (Steven Wilson has remixed the double album; it will be released next month.) I always found the album indulgent and banal, but the crowd was jazzed and attentive and even rowdy during the long (20-minutes-plus) “The Revealing Science of God (Dance of the Dawn)” and especially the percussion freakout with synchronized lights and smoke in “Ritual.”

The encore (that’s Brit-speak for encore), a one-two punch of “Roundabout” and “Starship Trooper,” got the crowd clapping, standing and cheering.


Bill Brotherton can be reached at bbrotherton@itemlive.com

YES at Lynn Auditorium on August 4th

SPONSORED BY LYNN AUDITORIUM.

YES (the band) will be at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium on August 4th at 8 p.m.

This British rock sensation is on tour now!  

“The band’s current line-up consists of singer Jon Davison, guitarist Steve Howe, drummer Alan White, keyboardist Geoff Downes and bassist Billy Sherwood. YES alumni are Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman, Trevor Horn, Trevor Rabin, Tony Kaye, Peter Banks, Patrick Moraz, Benoit David, Oliver Wakeman, Igor Khoroshev and Tom Brislin.” (YES Official Facebook Page)

To get tickets, please contact:

Lynn City Hall, at Three City Hall Square, in room 311.

Box Office Line:  781-599-SHOW

Also available through Ticketmaster:  1- 800- 745-3000

http://www.ticketmaster.com

http://yesworld.com

 

 

“All fired up” in City Hall

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo light up the stage at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium on Thursday during the Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo: We Live For Love Tour.

BY STEVE KRAUSE

 LYNN — Pat Benatar is more than just someone who was manufactured by MTV, even if she owes much of her early fame to exposure on the cable station. Indeed, Benatar was the first female artist ever featured on the fledgling all-music-video channel in 1981, something she acknowledged proudly Thursday night at Lynn Memorial Auditorium when she launched her version of the Rascals’ song “You Better Run,” a tune she made her own, then and now.

Today, Benatar is 63, and her voice shows the strains from 37 years of singing pop hits. While her pipes may be mature, they were still up to the test.

From the opening “All Fired Up” to the closing “Heartbreaker,” she didn’t miss a note, and had a blast frolicking around the stage with her husband/guitarist Neil Giraldo, whom she married in 1983.

He wrote many of Benatar’s hits, including “We Belong,” a song he made sure had an iconic beginning that would be instantly recognized. As soon as he played the first notes, it was.

Benatar split time between the hits, or as she called them “the holy 14, the songs I have to play if I don’t want to get grief on Facebook,” and some lesser-known ones. Also included was a tribute to the late Prince, “When Doves Cry.”

Another highlight was “Hell is for Children,” which she wrote with her husband after seeing a TV special in a New York hotel room.

“I hope the day comes when we never have to do this song again,” she told the large crowd in the auditorium.

No Benatar show would be complete without “Hit Me With Your Best Shot,” “Love Is A Battlefield” and “Invincible.” They were performed with gusto, as were all the rest. Despite all the pounding she’s done to her voice, it’s clear Pat Benatar still has it.


Steve Krause can be reached at skrause@itemlive.com.

 

 

An Odyssey begun in Lynn

Bella diGrazia and Matt Demirs in their Lynn English 2014 senior prom photo.

BY DILLON DURST

LYNN — Bella diGrazia and Matt Demirs let it be known that they’re proud to be from Lynn.

The Lynn English High School graduates recently published articles on Odyssey, a content platform that discovers and shares millennial voices, about their North Shore home.

Demirs’ piece, “8 Reasons Why Lynn Massachusetts is Highly Underrated,” has been shared on Facebook more than 3,000 times, while diGrazia’s “Why Growing Up in Lynn Massachusetts Made Me Racially Colorblind” has more than 5,000 hits.

DiGrazia, a 20-year-old communications major at the University of Massachusetts Boston, said she felt inspired to write the article because of the recent racial animosity in America and she wanted her voice to be heard. She said the response has been amazing.

“People who are from Lynn and have been living here for 60 years were sharing their stories with me,” she said. “It’s sort of been a dream come true.”

In the story, diGrazia, who grew up on Beacon Hill Avenue, talks about being a second-grader at Hood Elementary School and being asked to write something she had in common with her classmates.

“While everyone seemed to be writing down the same basic ideas, such as parents, clothes, fingers, toes, etc .., I wrote down ‘We all have hearts,’” she said. “As the teacher read my answer aloud, she was blown away. All my classmates sitting next to me came up and hugged me.”

Her second grade teacher, Tammy Marini, left a comment on the online story, which said, “It was so special to read this article and know that my second grade class had some influence in how you see the world.”

On reconnecting with Marini after so many years, diGrazia said, “It meant the world.”

Demirs, 20, an English major at Lake Forest College in Illinois, said he was missing home when he wrote the article about Lynn being underrated. Living more than 16 hours from home, he said it was cool seeing so many people agree with his list of eight beautiful destinations in the city.

“When you’re gone for so long, you realize how much you miss home,” he said.

Demirs lists such places such as Lynn Beach, Lynn Memorial Auditorium and Wyoma Square as a few of the city’s most special sites. He thought it hit home for a lot of people, especially at a time when “a lot of bad things are happening,” he said.

Demirs doesn’t get home much these days, but when he does, he said his go-to spot in Lynn is Monte’s Restaurant.

“They have great pizza,” he said.


Dillon Durst can be reached at ddurst@itmelive.com.

Summer Happenings

Neil Giraldo and Pat Benatar perform at the Lynn Auditorium on July 28.

BY PARIS HEALEY

Pop music fans needn’t travel into Boston or make a road trip to Gillette Stadium, the Xfinity Center or Tanglewood to hear top-notch entertainment. Here are some of the summer’s hottest shows happening on the North Shore.

Lynn Memorial Auditorium (lynnauditorium.com)

Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo — Thursday, July 28

  • Rock legend and four-time Grammy Award winner Benatar joined by her longtime husband and lead guitarist Giraldo
  • TOP SONGS: “Hit Me with Your Best Shot,” “We Belong,” “Love Is a Battlefield,” “Invincible”
  • Tickets start at $37

Yes — Thursday, Aug. 4

  • English band that has seen success through its progressive, symphonic style of rock music
  • TOP SONGS: “Owner Of A Lonely Heart,” “Roundabout,” “And You and I”
  • Tickets start at $57

Neil Sedaka — Monday, Aug. 15

  • Iconic American pop singer, pianist, composer and record producer; has written more than 500 songs for himself and other artists
  • TOP SONGS: “Oh Carol,” “Breaking Up Is Hard To Do,” “Calendar Girl”
  • Tickets start at $45

Ted Nugent — Monday, Aug. 22

  • American rock and roller, songwriter and activist
  • “Cat Scratch Fever,” “Stormtroopin’,” “Stranglehold”
  • Tickets start at $37

The Cabot, Beverly (thecabot.org)

Chris Robinson Brotherhood — Saturday, July 30

  • American blues rock band starring founding member of the Black Crowes
  • TOP SONGS: “Rosalee,” “Badlands Here We Come,” “Tulsa Yesterday”
  • Tickets start at $19

Anders Osborne — Friday, Aug. 12

  • American rock, R&B and blues singer/songwriter
  • TOP SONGS: “Louisiana Gold,” “Favorite Son,” “Pleasing You”
  • Tickets start at $19

The Wailers — Friday, Aug. 19

  • Jamaican Reggae band formed by the late Bob Marley
  • TOP SONGS: “Get Up Stand Up,” “Could You Be Loved,” “Buffalo Soldier”
  • Tickets are $35

Roomful of Blues — Saturday, Aug. 20

  • American blues and swing band

James Montgomery — Saturday, Aug. 20

  • American blues musician and singer
  • Tickets start at $21.50

War — Saturday, Aug. 27

  • Classic American funk band
  • TOP SONGS: “Spill the Wine,” “Why Can’t We Be Friends?,” “The World Is a Ghetto”
  • Tickets start at $35

Starship — Sunday, Aug. 28

  • American rock band
  • TOP SONGS: “Jane,” “We Built This City,” “Sara”
  • Tickets start at $35

Shalin Liu Performance Center, Rockport (rockportmusic.org)

Booker T. Jones — Thursday, July 28

  • American multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, record producer and arranger
  • TOP SONGS: “Green Onions,” “Time Is Tight,” “Hang ‘em High”
  • Tickets start at $45

Lizz Wright — Friday, July 29

  • American R&B/Jazz singer and composer
  • TOP SONGS: “My Heart,” “Salt,” “Song For Mia”
  • Tickets start at $41

Arlo Guthrie — Saturday and Sunday, July 30-31

  • American folk singer-songwriter
  • TOP SONGS: “Alice’s Restaurant,” “The City of New Orleans,” “Coming Into Los Angeles”
  • Tickets in balcony are $95

Tom Rush — Thursday and Friday, Aug. 4-5

  • Iconic American folk and blues singer, songwriter, guitarist
  • TOP SONGS: “No Regrets,” “Child’s Song,” “Galveston Flood”
  • Tickets start at $44

Kathy Mattea — Saturday, Aug. 6

  • American country and bluegrass performer who brings folk, Celtic and traditional country sounds to her music
  • TOP SONGS: “Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses,” “Where You’ve Been,” “Calling Me Home”
  • Tickets start at $44

James Hunter Six — Wednesday, Aug 10

  • English rhythm and blues/soul group
  • TOP SONGS: “(Baby) Hold On,” “If That Don’t Tell You,” “Stranded”
  • Tickets start at $29

Washington Square Residence offers Home Sweet Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

Fundraiser May 6th at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6, at 8 p.m. in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Story by Deb Glidden. 

(Photo is of the dining room at residence).

Washington Square Residence: An Art for Creating A Happy Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

 

Fundraiser May 6th at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6, at 8 p.m. in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Story by Deb Glidden. 

(Photo is of some of the art provided to 

decorate the Washington Square Residence 

for its tenants. Taken by Cassie Vitali).

Washington Square Residence: An Art for Creating A Happy Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

 

Fundraiser May 6th at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6, at 8 p.m. in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Story by Deb Glidden. 

(Photo is of some of the art provided to 

decorate the Washington Square Residence 

for its tenants. Taken by Cassie Vitali).

Washington Square Residence: An Art for Creating A Happy Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

 

Fundraiser May 6th at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6, at 8 p.m. in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Story by Deb Glidden. 

(Photo is of some of the art provided to 

decorate the Washington Square Residence 

for its tenants. Taken by Cassie Vitali).

Washington Square Residence: An Art for Creating A Happy Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

 

Fundraiser May 6th at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6, at 8 p.m. in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Story by Deb Glidden. 

(Photo is of some of the art provided to 

decorate the Washington Square Residence 

for its tenants. Taken by Cassie Vitali).

Washington Square Residence: An Art for Creating A Happy Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

 

Fundraiser May 6th at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6, at 8 p.m. in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Story by Deb Glidden. 

(Photo is of some of the art provided to 

decorate the Washington Square Residence 

for its tenants. Taken by Cassie Vitali).

Washington Square Residence: An Art for Creating A Place to Call Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6 at 8 pm in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Washington Square Residence: Help Them to Keep Offering A Home Sweet Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6 at 8 pm in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Washington Square Residence: Help Them to Keep Offering A Home Sweet Home

SPONSORED BY THE WASHINGTON SQUARE RESIDENCE.

For more than a century there has been a special place in downtown Lynn that has been called home for many individuals.  The Lynn Home for Young Women provides an affordable, safe, and welcoming place to live.  Executive Director Lisa Connolly said the private non-profit corporation has continued to fund its mission to provide “a home away from home” since its inception in 1912.

“Though tremendous changes have occurred over the past one hundred plus years, the commitment of the Lynn Home for Women has not,” she said. “We continue to assist women from those just starting out on life’s journey to those starting over. And anyone in between.”

LHW was the brainchild of leaders of the Young Women’s Temperance Union of the late-1800’s. The group gathered sponsors and established a “reading and rest room” on Market Street to offer respite for young women who came to Lynn to work in the shoe factories. What started as a single room for young women working in the city has grown to include two buildings on Broad Street, which have since been merged into one through an extension renovation.

Lynn Home for Young Women/Washington Square Residences (WSR) residents reflect the diversity of Lynn itself. Individuals range in age from 18 to more than 70 years of age. They include students, disabled individuals, survivors of domestic violence, working women, and retirees.  They have come from Africa, Brazil, Guatemala, Alabama, Oklahoma, Lynn and many other places, but one thing that they all have in common is they each call LHW/WSR home.

Loretta Cuffe-O’Donnell,  who serves as president of LHW Board of Directors, has ties with the organization that go back a generation. “My mother used to help women get housing there,” O’Donnell said. “As a child I had friends who lived in LHW. It did so much for young women over the years. It used to be for women only but we have opened our doors to men as well,” she said. “It’s a beautiful place to live where people can get a good meal and support they need.”

O’Donnell pointed out the two buildings underwent a $6 million renovation in 2010. The Broad Street facility is environmentally friendly and houses 43 residents in furnished single occupancy rooms with private or shared bathrooms and studios. LHA/WSR has six shared kitchens, laundry facilities, a computer room, foyer and large back yard. It houses a professional food service and a large dining room where dinner is served four nights a week.

Resident Jessica Tower, who is a graduate student at Salem State University, said she enjoys the  camaraderie of the communal dinners.

“It makes meal planning and budgeting easier for me,” she said. “There are four nights I don’t have to worry about cooking and it gives me more time to dedicate to school work.”

O’Donnell pointed out that WSR is constantly evolving and expanding its programs to meet the needs of the residents. “WSR is going forward and doing even more today than it had in the past,” she said.

Connolly added WSR was innovative when it was founded and has continually adapted to meet the changing needs of individuals in the community and it is a housing model that other agencies are trying to recreate.

“Recently we were contacted by a group from Notre Dame University regarding SRO (single room occupancy) style housing,” she said. “A group of 10 students spent the day with our staff, residents and management gleaning best practices for supportive, affordable, single occupancy housing in the fight to address housing insecurity in our society today.”

One resident said WSR is a place where she was able to seek refuge from an abusive relationship and begin to put her life back together in a supportive and safe environment.

“I was stuck in an unsafe place where I didn’t belong,” she said. “Moving here helped me by offering me a new beginning and it is helping me get to a place where I should be in my life.”

“New Beginnings” is focal point of what WSR offers and is an apt name for its fund raising event on May 6 at 8 pm in the Lynn Memorial Auditorium. Bill McGuinness is hosting ”New Beginnings” which includes a dazzling array of local and national talent. Members of the bands Boston and Beatlejuice will come together in the return of the super group Spring Rain.  Local favorites include the Lynn Public Schools Jazz Band, Community Auditions winner Sheree Dunwell, Don White, and The Dirty Floorboards. Rounding out the musical extravaganza are Jim Dennis, Not Sure Community and Carolyn Cole. Tickets are $42, general admission, and are available at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Box Office in Lynn City Hall, by calling 781- 599-7469 or online at www.lynnauditorium.com.

Horse With No Name rides into City Hall

PHOTO BY PAULA MULLER
Dewey Bunnell and Gerry Beckley of America perform in Lynn.

By LEAH DEARBORN

LYNN — A relaxed crowd gathered Thursday night for the classic soft rock tunes of America.

Original bandmates Gerry Beckley and Dewey Bunnell met in high school and rose to fame with their ’70s hit, “Horse With No Name.” After 46 years of touring, America has released nearly three dozen albums.  

The band made their stage entrance a few minutes late at the Lynn Memorial Auditorium, warming up with “Tin Man.” While Bunnell and Beckley started off looking somewhat stiff, the duo seemed to limber up by the second track, playing “You Can Do Magic” to flashing blue and red lights and smoke.     

The band returned to their roots a few songs in, choosing numbers from the first side of their earliest album and working their way chronologically up to later work.

“I Need You” got the most rise out of the crowd, with fans waving their arms and handing a bouquet of flowers up to the stage.

Wearing plaid and sneakers, Bunnell and Beckley appeared most at home on acoustic guitar and mirrored the laid back attitude expressed by the audience.

America’s 2015 album “Lost And Found” took a backseat to more recognizable songs, but the audience did get a taste of the band’s most recent compilation. It presents a slightly harder sound than America’s 1970s hits but maintains a clear continuity with older discography.

While longtime fans may have turned out to watch original members Bunnell and Beckley take the stage, newer additions Bill Worrell (guitar) and Richard Campbell (bass) were highlights of the show, bringing an impressive level of energy and focus to the heavier rock numbers.

The electric guitar solo by Worrell in the 1974 song “Hollywood” was especially charged, taking the band “dangerously close to jamming,” in the words of Beckley.

Auditorium general manager Jamie Marsh expressed a personal fondness for America, commenting, “It’s a really great crowd. These are the songs I grew up with.”

He added that the auditorium booked upcoming shows with Pat Benatar, Ted Nugent and Yes earlier that day. 

Mathis brings romance to Lynn

PHOTO BY PAULA MULLER
Johnny Mathis performs on Friday night in Lynn.

BY LEAH DEARBORN

LYNN — Musical icon Johnny Mathis brought his velvety vocals and romantic ballads to the Lynn Memorial Auditorium Friday night.

Mathis, 80, has recorded more than six dozen albums over the course of his career, which took off after a 1957 appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show.

The sold-out concert on his 60th anniversary tour was packed with a mature audience, but a number of young faces mingled in the enthusiastic crowd, as well.

Mathis drew applause as soon as he stepped out from behind the curtain in a pale gray suit. Launching into song without preamble, he played “Life Is A Song Worth Singing” and several other tunes before acknowledging the orchestra that filled the stage behind him.

“Some of these gentlemen are as old as I am,” he quipped before pausing for a moment to add, “No one’s as old as I am.”

Despite the self-deprecating humor, Mathis put on a confident show with a voice that can still resonate across the hall, hitting subtle lows and soaring highs. Each number progressed with barely a pause for breath between them.

A few songs selected for the first half of the show included “It’s Not For Me To Say” and the energetic “Gina.” One of his most popular tunes, “Moon River,” which was featured in Audrey Hepburn’s “Breakfast At Tiffany’s,” was a crowd favorite that dripped with charm and nostalgia.

Mathis also took a moment to remember the song’s composer, Henry Mancini.  

Special guest Gary Mule Deer, a 77-year-old comedian and musician, started his routine with a Johnny Cash cover, only to stop mid-song and begin on a string of jokes about the quality of Denny’s meals and childhood anecdotes.

The sudden injection of humor seemed an abrupt shift from the night’s serious musical performances.   

Johnny Mathis is what he has always been, delivering exactly the kind of show that his fans have expected of him for so many years.

The full string section, drum rolls and nearly operatic ballads are unabashedly dramatic. To quote Mathis’ lyrics, watching the stage invoked a sense of being “on the outside looking in” at a bygone time.

 

Dancing in the Streets at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium

SPONSORED BY JEFF PARRY PROMOTIONS
Join the original and the best celebration of Motown’s Greatest Hits with the spectacular,
critically acclaimed “Dancing it the Streets”.  Experience the energy and electricity of the motor city in a stunning production packed with hit after hit, ‘all killer, no filler’!  The talented cast and band will bring to life the infectious, melodic, foot-tapping songs with a touch of soul and style guaranteed to have you signing along and dancing in the aisles.
Expect your favourite songs made famous by THE FOUR TOPS, THE TEMPTATIONS, STEVIE
WONDER, MARVIN GAYE, LIONEL RICHIE, THE SUPREMES, SMOKEY ROBINSON & THE MIRACLES, MARTHA REEVES & THE VANDELLAS, and many more.
For more information and tickets, go to: www.ticketmaster.com or call the Lynn Memorial Auditorium
box office at: 781-599- SHOW.

Dancing in the Streets at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium

SPONSORED BY JEFF PARRY PROMOTIONS
Join the original and the best celebration of Motown’s Greatest Hits with the spectacular,
critically acclaimed “Dancing it the Streets”.  Experience the energy and electricity of the motor city in a stunning production packed with hit after hit, ‘all killer, no filler’!  The talented cast and band will bring to life the infectious, melodic, foot-tapping songs with a touch of soul and style guaranteed to have you signing along and dancing in the aisles.
Expect your favourite songs made famous by THE FOUR TOPS, THE TEMPTATIONS, STEVIE
WONDER, MARVIN GAYE, LIONEL RICHIE, THE SUPREMES, SMOKEY ROBINSON & THE MIRACLES, MARTHA REEVES & THE VANDELLAS, and many more.
For more information and tickets, go to: www.ticketmaster.com or call the Lynn Memorial Auditorium
box office at: 781-599- SHOW.

Dancing in the Streets at The Lynn Memorial Auditorium

SPONSORED BY JEFF PARRY PROMOTIONS
Join the original and the best celebration of Motown’s Greatest Hits with the spectacular,
critically acclaimed “Dancing it the Streets”.  Experience the energy and electricity of the motor city in a stunning production packed with hit after hit, ‘all killer, no filler’!  The talented cast and band will bring to life the infectious, melodic, foot-tapping songs with a touch of soul and style guaranteed to have you signing along and dancing in the aisles.
Expect your favourite songs made famous by THE FOUR TOPS, THE TEMPTATIONS, STEVIE
WONDER, MARVIN GAYE, LIONEL RICHIE, THE SUPREMES, SMOKEY ROBINSON & THE MIRACLES, MARTHA REEVES & THE VANDELLAS, and many more.
For more information and tickets, go to: www.ticketmaster.com or call the Lynn Memorial Auditorium
box office at: 781-599- SHOW.