Deaths

Wayne Alarm: Fire system up to code?

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

At Wayne Alarm, we always make sure our customers and clients are fully prepared in case of any emergency. And with warmer weather fast approaching, it is important to make sure your fire system is still reliable, inspected, tested and maintained. A quarterly check on your system can make a huge difference in your safety. So how can homeowners or business owners keep their systems updated? Follow these tips below:

  • Make sure Wayne Alarms fire system is up to date with its detection alarm. Without this feature, the system would fail to notify you if smoke appears or to dispatch the firefighters to save your home and evacuate your family.
  • Check your fire exits to make sure doors easily open and no objects are blocking the exits. It’s also important to ensure that it is properly marked and everyone will have no trouble finding it.
  • Make sure there are no flammable objects or substances in or near the exits. If so, it is best to store them away in the right place to prevent any fire.

On average, there are over 374,000 residential fires and over 2,000 deaths. Don’t let yourself become a statistic. These additional tips could make a huge difference to avoid any fire.

  • Smoking – If you smoke, make sure you do so in areas where it is not prohibited. Or if you smoke, make sure it is only fire-safe cigarettes. Since fires and deaths result from fires that have started in a living/family rooms, or bedrooms, it is better to smoke outside instead. Most importantly, keep lighters, matches and cigarettes out of reach of children.
  • Electrical – When using electrical kitchen appliances make sure they are put into a receptacle outlet one at a time, as the outlet can dangerously heat up.

Call us today to schedule for a free in-home consultation.

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www.waynealarm.com

Wayne Alarm: Fire system up to code?

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

At Wayne Alarm, we always make sure our customers and clients are fully prepared in case of any emergency. And with warmer weather fast approaching, it is important to make sure your fire system is still reliable, inspected, tested and maintained. A quarterly check on your system can make a huge difference in your safety. So how can homeowners or business owners keep their systems updated? Follow these tips below:

  • Make sure Wayne Alarms fire system is up to date with its detection alarm. Without this feature, the system would fail to notify you if smoke appears or to dispatch the firefighters to save your home and evacuate your family.
  • Check your fire exits to make sure doors easily open and no objects are blocking the exits. It’s also important to ensure that it is properly marked and everyone will have no trouble finding it.
  • Make sure there are no flammable objects or substances in or near the exits. If so, it is best to store them away in the right place to prevent any fire.

On average, there are over 374,000 residential fires and over 2,000 deaths. Don’t let yourself become a statistic. These additional tips could make a huge difference to avoid any fire.

  • Smoking – If you smoke, make sure you do so in areas where it is not prohibited. Or if you smoke, make sure it is only fire-safe cigarettes. Since fires and deaths result from fires that have started in a living/family rooms, or bedrooms, it is better to smoke outside instead. Most importantly, keep lighters, matches and cigarettes out of reach of children.
  • Electrical – When using electrical kitchen appliances make sure they are put into a receptacle outlet one at a time, as the outlet can dangerously heat up.

Call us today to schedule for a free in-home consultation.

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“Here yesterday… Here today…Here tomorrow.”

www.waynealarm.com

Wayne Alarm: Danger of carbon monoxide

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

Home Security ranges from having a burglar system to proper smoke and carbon monoxide systems. Wayne Alarm system wants to make sure that people not only have the correct carbon monoxide alarms set up in their homes but that they are also informed about the dangers that it can create.

Once carbon monoxide (CO) is breathed in, it actually replaces the oxygen in your blood, killing cells and starving vital organs. One of the biggest problems with CO is that it has no taste, smell and as humans our bodily senses cannot detect it. Without sufficient CO detectors installed in your home, you place you and your family in very serious danger.

CO gets produced whenever a material in your home starts to burn. Particularly homes that have fuel-burning appliances or attached garages are apt to have more CO issues. Some of the more frequent sources in which CO gets produced in our homes is from:

  • Furnaces/boilers
  • Ovens/gas stoves
  • Motor Vehicles
  • Fireplaces
  • Clothes dryers
  • And much more

It is estimated that around 500 people each year in the U.S. die from unintended CO exposure. The good news comes from the fact that carbon monoxide poisoning can be prevented with installing CO alarms in your home and having them professionally monitored by Wayne Alarm Systems.

For more information about Carbon Monoxide systems, please feel free to contact us. We can be reached over the phone at 781-595-0000 or through our online contact form at www.waynealarm.com.

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“Here yesterday… Here today…Here tomorrow.”

www.waynealarm.com

Hebb, Doughty expected to be arraigned

ITEM FILE PHOTOS
Michael Hebb, left, and Wes Doughty are accused in connection with the killing of a Peabody couple.

SALEM Two men facing charges in connection with the February killing of a Peabody couple are scheduled to be arraigned Monday in Salem Superior Court.

Wes Doughty, 39, will be arraigned on two counts of murder and rape, attempted arson, carjacking, kidnapping, and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Co-defendant, Michael Hebb, 45, will also be arraigned on two counts of accessory after the fact and one count of attempted arson.

The bodies of Mark Greenlaw, 37, and fiancee Jennifer O’Connor, 40, were found in the basement of a Farm Avenue home on Feb. 18. Greenlaw had been shot in the head and O’Connor was stabbed in her neck and torso.

Brothers face murder for fatal brick attack

In addition to being accused of killing the couple, Doughty allegedly raped O’Connor, took steps to set the Farm Avenue house on fire, and carjacked Kenneth Metz, 64, in Middleton days later while on the run, according to law enforcement officials.

Police in South Carolina arrested Doughty on Feb. 24 after questioning him for panhandling. Investigators discovered he was wanted for the Peabody double homicide in Peabody and the carjacking.

Hebb was indicted for two counts of accessory after the fact and one count of attempted arson. Murder charges he was arraigned on Feb. 21 in Peabody District Court have been dismissed.

 

Violent acts terrible but not random, mayor says

ITEM FILE PHOTO
Lynn police close off Exchange Street while they investigate the scene of a double shooting April 16.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — Despite the recent rash of violence in the city, Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy said Lynn is safe.

“It’s been terrible,” she said. “But these are not random acts of violence.”

Kennedy assured residents that police are working to solve these crimes and city dwellers should not be fearful.

“People in our community should not worry about their safety because these victims and perpetrators are known to one another. One may be attributed to road rage.”

The most recent incident occurred on Easter Sunday when two men were shot in front of the LynnArts building, leaving one dead and the second hospitalized.  The man killed in Sunday afternoon’s double shooting in Central Square has been identified as Leonardo Clement, 46, of Lynn.

Rev. to shooter: You came to the wrong place

Also this month, two men were charged with raping and beating a man, leaving the victim critically injured. The Lynn resident underwent surgery for his injuries at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Lynn residents Darrin Stephens, 50, and John Michelin, 31, were charged with aggravated rape and assault and battery with a baseball bat in a Chase Street apartment, police said.

Documents detail scene of sexual attack

Last month, a New Hampshire man was charged with murder in the fatal shooting of a 24-year-old pizza deliveryman. Brian Brito, 21, of Manchester, N.H., pleaded not guilty to murder during his arraignment at Lynn District Court. Brito is accused of killing Mohammadreza Sina Zangiband, an employee of Atha’s Famous Roast Beef.

Police say road rage may have spurred shooting

Also in March, Tomas Barillas, 20, of Lynn, was held without bail following his arraignment on a murder charge in connection a stabbing death of Jason Arias-Amador, 20, of Boston.

Evidence seized from murder suspect’s phone

On Monday night, a community vigil was organized by Lynn Museum/LynnArts where residents lit candles for the victims and stood against violence.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

 

Slow down: Speed limits could change

PHOTO BY PAULA MULLER
A pickup truck drives down Eastern Avenue in Lynn.

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN – If a proposal before the Traffic Commission is enacted, motorists will have to drive a little slower in the city.

Next Tuesday the five-member panel will consider reducing the speed limit to 25 in thickly settled sections of Lynn.

“If lowering the speeding limit would reduce the amount of accidents and increase public safety, we endorse it,” said Police Lt. Michael Kmiec.

Lynn’s proposal comes as other cities and towns including Boston, Somerville, and Peabody have already adopted the change that drops the default speed limit from 30 miles per hour to 25.

Last year, the Legislature adopted the Municipal Modernization Act, which allows municipalities to decrease their speed limits.

Safety experts say for every mile per hour slower motorists drive, the less likely they are to cause severe injury or death if they strike a pedestrian or cyclist.

Statistics have shown that when struck by a vehicle going 40 mph, only one in 10 pedestrians survive. Conversely, when struck by a car going 20 mph, nine out of 10 pedestrians survive.

In February, the Peabody City Council adopted the city’s default speed limit to 25 miles per hour.

Swampscott auction is about to set sale

Still, not everyone is convinced it’s the right idea.

Commission member Robert Stilian said he needs more information before making up his mind.

“I’m still trying to decide whether this is a good idea,” he said. “If we do go forward with it, we’d need new signs and drivers must be given fair warning, because a speeding ticket can impact the cost of car insurance for many years.”

Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh said the lower speed limit will bring Boston closer to its goal of eliminating traffic-related deaths by 2030.

“Reducing the default speed limit will create safer roads for all, and I’m pleased our hard work and commitment to safer roads has created this new standard,” said Walsh in a statement.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

Deadliest fire month demands a plan

There are 11 days left in March and it is already the deadliest month for fires in Massachusetts in the last five years, according to state Department of Fire Services statistics.

Eleven people died so far in fires in March. This is a grim and intolerable statistic that can be reduced through a concerted effort combining technology, economic incentives and enforcement.

Fire has been a potential deadly threat for as long as human beings have existed. The tragedy of fire deaths in 21st-century America is magnified by the knowledge that planning and precautions can end fire fatalities.

Far too many fires are attributable to human error, including faulty electrical systems, careless smoking and misused candles. Fire departments, including Lynn’s, spend time and money ensuring more buildings have smoke alarms and more children learn fire safety basics.

These efforts are paying off and modern home construction methods help confine fires until they can be extinguished. But more can be done to reduce fire risk and avoid fatalities.

Fire departments should be given increased resources and responsibility for conducting fire safety-related building inspections. In some instances, town or city fire departments and building or inspection departments should be merged to ensure all available expertise is focused on eliminating fire hazards.

Two-alarm fire in Swampscott

Inspectors and firefighters often work closely to identify buildings where fire hazards exist in the form of inadequate fire protection, faulty structures and hazardous material storage. But landlords and building owners should know fire departments and inspectors will take steps to end fire deaths by accelerating and stiffening enforcement.

Insurance companies also have a role to play in ending fatalities. Industry representatives and state legislators should formulate policy discount measures designed to serve as incentives for building owners to upgrade fire safeguards.

It is expensive for a small landlord or even a multi-property owner to add sprinklers or point-of-origin fire retardant systems. But insurance companies can reduce costly claims filed in the wake of fires by providing significant premium discounts to owners who are willing to spend money on fire safety.

The last element of stepped-up fire safety enforcement is technology. All efforts must be undertaken to improve fire-retardant material and to develop fire suppression equipment suitable for installation in residential buildings as well as commercial properties.

Technological innovators only need a market to spur their efforts to develop fire safety technology. Improved technology combined with reasonable discount incentives and increased enforcement can represent a three-pronged approach to ending fire tragedies.

When Lynn loses a teacher

The late Tim Ring is the most recent in a sad string of losses for Lynn residents. It is a loss — like the ones that preceded it — that has hit the city hard.

Ring’s death last Saturday from medical complications came on the heels of three other losses that sent many city residents into mourning. English High School basketball coach Mike Carr and veteran former St. Mary’s educator Michele Durgin died at the end of January and beloved public school principal Vic Tseki died in February.

Taken individually, these deaths leave hundreds of family members and friends feeling a never-to-be-filled void in their lives. Taken collectively, the loss of four sterling educators is almost too difficult to fathom.

Tim Ring was that rare man who embraced the pursuit of knowledge with a childlike zeal. He was also a master craftsman who felt comfortable around an unfinished home or a piece of antique furniture crying out for restoration.

Popular retired Lynn educator dies

Some people shy away from exploring the unknown and from facing a challenge and saying, “I can master that.” Not Tim Ring. With what one good friend described as Ring’s “‘rascal’ attitude,” the veteran educator shouldered new projects and launched new educational ventures with his characteristic mix of humility and offbeat humor.

Ring hated talking about himself. But he loved being around people who caught the learning bug from him. He loved seeing students look around Lynn and realize they are not limited by their surroundings, just the limits of their dreams.

Ring, like Carr, Durgin and Tseki, believed in public education’s essential fairness. They knew that every kid is different. But they also knew that the right teacher, even a teacher who spends 10 minutes listening to a kid, can set a young person on a course toward hope, prosperity and self confidence.

Ring logged a 39-year teaching career. Top public school administrators hailed him as the school system’s most veteran educator when he retired last summer. In true Tim Ring fashion, Ring brushed off that praise with a funny, mischievous glint in his eye. He was a guy who went through life appreciating the moments when the joke was on him.

It will be easy to measure the influence Tim Ring had on Lynn residents. The number of people paying their respects to his family and to his memory will be as long as the lines that snaked through wakes memorializing Carr, Durgin and Tseki.

Everyone who spends a few minutes remembering Tim Ring this week will silently say, “I wish he could have met my son or my daughter.” “I wish we could talk about books one more time.” “I wish we could laugh together one more time.”

What will it mean to Lynn to lose Tim Ring and fellow educators who died since the year began? The city will be all the poorer for not having their counsel, their wisdom and their love to help guide it forward.

61 years since train crash took 13 lives

PHOTO BY ARTHUR REYNOLDS AND BILL CONWAY
Bystanders and emergency personnel look at the aftermath of the deadly train wreck that happened 61 years ago in Swampscott.

Tuesday marked 61 years since one of the worst train wrecks in North Shore history. Last year, the 60th anniversary was marked in The Item.

On Feb. 28, 1956, there was a crash involving two trains in Swampscott shortly after 8 a.m, that resulted in the deaths of 13 people and injuries to about 100 others.

At the time, there was a blizzard outside and wet snow covered the traffic signals, causing the train to halt in Swampscott. After the train stopped, the foreman got out and headed back to the telephone station about 100 yards back to call dispatch.

After seeing another train approaching, the foreman tried to warn it with flags and flares, but it went right past him. The oncoming train struck the one stopped at the Swampscott station from behind.

Most of the people who died were from the first car of the oncoming Train 2406, as the frame was sheared away from the shell, leaving the roof opened as if by a can opener.

9th apparent fatal OD in ‘record-setting’ month

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN Police responded to two fatal apparent opioid overdoses this week, including one on Thursday, which marks the ninth in the city in February.

Both deaths are being classified by police as apparent heroin overdoses.

There have been 31 overdoses this month, as of late Thursday afternoon, according to Lynn Police Lt. Rick Donnelly.

In January, the city had 26 overdoses and two of those were fatal. In a five-day span from Feb. 3-7, there were five fatal apparent heroin overdoses in the city.

Police responded to Mudge Street on Thursday at approximately 5:30 a.m., and found a 34-year-old woman who wasn’t breathing. An ambulance was called, and the woman was brought the hospital, where she was pronounced dead, Donnelly said.

On Monday, at approximately 6:30 a.m., police found a 34-year-old woman who wasn’t breathing in the middle of the street on Melville Place, Donnelly said.

Donnelly said the woman was a known drug user and it was apparent that she had been down for quite some time. The medical examiner’s office was called, and the body was picked up and brought to Boston.

“I think since we started tracking them, this is a record-setting month,” Donnelly said of the fatal apparent overdoses. “Before we saw heroin overdose deaths were going down when we started using Narcan (the life-saving overdose drug). Now, it seems that there’s more potent drugs out there and we’re getting there too late.

“When we started using the Narcan, we didn’t see a decline in overdoses, but we did see a decline in overdose deaths,” he continued. “Now, this month, the deaths are increasing. Common sense would tell you there’s stronger heroin out there and it could be fentanyl that’s attributed to why there’s so many deaths this month.”

Lynn Police Sgt. Rick Carrow, of the Drug Task Force, said in a previous interview that he’s seeing more overdoses with straight fentanyl, which is 100 times stronger than the heroin seen on the streets.

Healthy Streets ready to help


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley

Working to overcome addiction in Malden

COURTESY PHOTO
Malden Mayor Gary Christenson, left and Police Chief Kevin Molis take a look at the methods of hiding at-risk substances or objects during a recent presentation.

By STEVE FREKER

MALDEN — It started out as a discussion with goals simple and yet very complex.

A small, motivated group of Malden residents wanted to help educate as many fellow residents as possible about substance abuse and help local families and individuals.

That’s how Malden Overcoming Addiction (MOA) was formed and MOA President Paul Hammersley was in that small group of locals who gathered some 18 months ago.

“It was three or four people in a room. We had big ideas and big plans,” Hammersley said Sunday. “We just could not project how far we could go at the time.”

Hammersley said “hundreds” of residents have become involved since MOA’s formation and he said the organization formalized its status as a 501(c) corporation last week.  Hammersley said just in the past week he and other MOA board members helped four local opioid addicts get beds in rehabilitation facilities.

“We’re out there more and more now, providing service and assistance to anyone whose lives are affected by addiction,” he said.

English High among life sciences grants recipients

Opioid abuse and particularly deaths from opioid overdoses have skyrocketed locally, regionally and nationally in the past several years. A state Department of Health (DPH) report released last Friday documented the stark numbers: Nearly 2,000 died from opioid overdoses in Massachusetts in 2016, an increase of about 13 percent from 2015.

MOA holds regular meetings and hosts an increasing number of events including a four-session presentation of  “In Plain Sight” at the regional Salvation Army headquarters in Malden.

The group also collaborated with the Malden Police, Rx4Prevention, South Bay Mental Health, Tewksbury Police, Reading Coalition against Substance Abuse and Hallmark Health to host the parents-only presentation featuring a mock teenage bedroom identifying places where teens are likely to hide drugs, alcohol and other substances.

Hammersley said “In Plain Sight” is intended to spur conversations between teenagers and their parents about behavior leading to opioid and substance abuse disorders.

“Parents were encouraged to have honest and candid discussion of the topics of underage drinking and substance abuse with their children,” he added.

Hammersley said MOA enjoys full city support through Mayor Gary Christenson and the Malden Police Department.

“We are making a difference in people’s lives, that was our intention from the start,” Hammersley said.

For more information on Malden Overcoming Addiction, visit maldenovercoming.com or contact MOA at 781-838-2203.

Peabody murder suspect captured

PHOTOS BY SCOTT EISEN
A Peabody police officer gets out of his cruiser in front of 84 Aborn St.

PEABODY — The District Attorney’s office announced at 1 p.m. Monday that Michael Hebb, 45, of Peabody was taken into custody shortly after noon today without incident in connection with a weekend double homicide on Farm Avenue.

Hebb was arrested at 84 Aborn St. in Peabody with assistance from a Special Weapons and Tactics team.  He will be arraigned on Tuesday in Peabody District Court on two counts of first-degree murder.

Another suspect is still at large.

The victims in the Peabody double homicide have been identified as Mark Greenlaw, 37, and Jennifer O’Connor, 39, both thought to be living at 19 Farm Avenue in Peabody.  A tip to police on Saturday evening led investigators to the residence near Route 128. An investigation throughout Sunday indicated the pair were in a dating relationship.

The Office of the Medical Examiner is still performing the autopsies so cause and manner of death is still unknown.

2 more die from apparent opioid overdose

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN Police responded to two fatal apparent opioid overdoses on Monday, which marks seven in the city in February.

In January, the city had 26 overdoses and two of those were fatal. In a five-day span from Feb. 3-7, there were five fatal apparent heroin overdoses in the city.

On Monday, police responded to a residence on Green Street shortly after 10:30 a.m., where they found a dead 40-year-old man. There were obvious signs of death and the medical examiner was called to get the body, Lynn Police Lt. Rick Donnelly said.

Officers found evidence of opioid use at the scene and suspect the death was from a heroin overdose, Donnelly said.

Later on, police responded to a call for an unresponsive woman at a Western Avenue apartment at approximately 8:19 p.m. The 42-year-old Lynn woman, who didn’t live at the address where she was found, was taken to the hospital where she was pronounced dead, Donnelly said.

The woman had been in the bed when police showed up. The people with her called police after they were unable to wake her up. Police were told that the woman was on methadone treatment for her addictions and several prescription bottles were at the scene. Narcan, or Naloxone, the lifesaving overdose drug, was administered with no results, Donnelly said.

Donnelly said the death is a suspected heroin overdose, and that’s how it’s being classified. He said it could be from fentanyl, but police still classify it as a heroin overdose.

Police have said previously that they think there’s a bad batch of heroin or fentanyl going around, to explain the spike in overdose fatalities this month.

Lynn Police Sgt. Rick Carrow, of the Drug Task Force, said in a previous interview that he’s seeing more overdoses with straight fentanyl, which is 100 times stronger than the heroin seen on the streets. Earlier this month, he said that in these cases, his educated guess would be that the fatalities are from fentanyl.

‘There’s definitely a bad batch’ going around


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley

Healthy Streets ready to help

ITEM PHOTO BY OWEN O’ROURKE
Mary Wheeler, program director of Healthy Streets, teaches a woman how to use Narcan.

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN — After a recent five-day span of five fatal apparent opioid overdoses, Mary Wheeler, program director of Healthy Streets, wants people to know they have a place to go for help.

Lynn Police and the Essex County District Attorney’s office reported five fatal apparent overdoses from Feb. 3-7. There was also a fatal suspected crack cocaine overdose in that time span. Updated statistics for February were not available on Monday.

Healthy Streets Outreach Program describes itself as an HIV/AIDS and overdose prevention program serving active injection drug users and their families on the North Shore. Wheeler said the organization runs a program that provides Naloxone, or Narcan, the lifesaving overdose drug.

Healthy Streets is a Department of Public Health Naloxone distribution pilot site. Wheeler said there are more than 20 sites throughout the state. Lynn became a state-funded pilot site in 2007, one of the first eight in Massachusetts. The locations were chosen based on where there was community need, Wheeler said.

Wheeler said the Naloxone distribution site teaches people how to recognize an overdose, respond and administer the medication. Anyone can get trained, including active users and family members.

Wheeler said Massachusetts has a high rate of 911 calls among people who have been trained in Narcan. Part of the training at the pilot site is calling 911. Some people get scared and don’t want to call, but most people do. She said the Good Samaritan Law, which provides protection from drug possession charges when an overdose witness or victim seeks medical attention or calls 911 for medical assistance, has helped with that. Before, people historically didn’t want to call.

“Our catch phrase is usually ‘it’s better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it,” Wheeler said of Naloxone. “It’s not the ultimate answer, but it buys people time.”

Wheeler said there’s been a huge increase in overdoses and fentanyl, which police say is 100 times stronger than heroin found on the streets. She said overdoses may be up because people might not know what they’re buying or are using alone. She said people may also inject more times a day, as fentanyl acts fast, but wears off more quickly.

According to Department of Public Health statistics, there were 1,574 confirmed opioid-related deaths in 2015, and 1,747 estimated deaths, which was a 20 percent increase over 2014. There were 1.2 opioid-related deaths a day in 2015. In 2016, Wheeler said there were likely more than 2,000 deaths.

“There’s definitely more fatalities in recent years,” Wheeler said. “I think this problem has been a problem for many years in Massachusetts and is just escalating to a point where it’s going to be very, very hard for us to get a handle on it. I think there were a lot of years prior to now where people were trying to get a lot of attention and focus on the problem and people weren’t really listening. And now, we’re here with 2,000 deaths a year in Massachusetts. Hopefully, we’re not too late.”

She said people can also come to the organization to make calls and secure detox beds elsewhere. Wheeler said there’s an issue with bed shortage. People are able to find a detox bed, but have more trouble finding a bed for after care.

The opioid crisis is a public health issue, Wheeler said. She said one of the things that’s been happening for many years in Massachusetts is there’s been a spike in HIV and Hepatitis C cases. She said the organization has seen issues with people who have overdosed multiple times and are starting to mirror people who have a brain injury. It becomes a more complicated issue after they stop using drugs, she said.

Wheeler said there’s also trauma among people who work in the field because of the massive amount of drug-related deaths. There can also be soft tissue infections and more abscesses among users from injecting fentanyl constantly.

People can access Healthy Streets at 339-440-5633 or walk in at 100 Willow St., where the organization is located on the second floor.

Opioid fight hitting home in Peabody


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley.

‘There’s definitely a bad batch’ going around

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN — Police responded to another fatal apparent opioid overdose on Tuesday afternoon, the fifth in the city since Friday.

Lynn Police Lt. Rick Donnelly said police responded to Kingsley Terrace shortly after 12:50 p.m. on a report of a man not breathing. They found that the 35-year-old man was dead.

“It’s being treated as a heroin overdose death,” Donnelly said.

The man’s 32-year-old male roommate called police when he came home and found his roommate dead. He told police that his roommate was a heroin user. Hypodermic needles, a syringe and a spoon were found in the house. Based on the investigation, police think it could be another heroin overdose death, Donnelly said.

Three people died in Lynn from apparent opioid overdoses between Friday morning and Sunday morning. A 22-year-old woman died on Monday from a suspected overdose. In February, there have been at least 14 apparent overdoses with five fatalities. In January, the city had 26 overdoses and two of those were fatal.

“When you see a spike like this, there’s definitely a bad batch of heroin or fentanyl going around,” Donnelly said.  

Over the weekend, Essex County had seven fatal apparent overdoses, including two in Peabody and the three in Lynn. There was also one fatal apparent overdose each in Lawrence and Haverhill. There have been at least 10 fatalities from suspected overdoses in the county this month, more than half of the 16 reported in January.

Lynn Police Sgt. Rick Carrow, of the Drug Task Force, said on Monday that he’s seeing more overdoses with straight fentanyl, which is 100 times stronger than the heroin seen on the streets. In these cases, he said that his educated guess would be that the fatalities are from fentanyl.

Help Lynn police nab armed robbery suspect


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley.

‘Christmas arrived broken’ in Falmouth

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FALMOUTH — A funeral has been held for the first of two Falmouth High School student-athletes who died in a car crash last week.

Teammates of 17-year-old James Lavin, wearing their hockey jerseys, lined a sidewalk Tuesday as members of the school’s state championship football team accompanied the casket into St. Patrick Church.

The Rev. Timothy Goldrick told mourners that “Christmas arrived broken” in Falmouth. He said the Cape Cod town is grief-stricken over the deaths of Lavin and his best friend, 17-year-old Owen Higgins.

The teens were in a car that slammed into a tree after hockey practice Thursday. Lavin, the driver, died at the scene. Higgins died at a hospital the following day.

A wake for Higgins will be held on Thursday, followed by a funeral Mass on Friday.

‘There is nothing to compare to the experience’