cooking

Wayne Alarm: Tips for a pet-friendly home

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

Our four-legged fur friends are not just pets, but a part of our families. Their safety is just as important as ours. Whether is making sure they get enough nutrition in their food or ensuring pavements are not too hot or cold to protect their paws, their safety is just as important. Follow along for some pet-friendly protocols to have in your homes for their safety:

  1. The best way to minimize damage is to create a space just for your furry friend. This helps acclimate and dog friendly near their bed can make a difference.
  2. Dogs enjoy hiding and running around and it can sometimes be too dangerous for them. The best way to prevent them from running out unsupervised is with deadbolts on doors, locks on windows and even baby gates on stairs. Cabinet doors should also maintain secure with latches, as it can cause your dog to get trapped in the cabinet.
  3. Get rid of dangerous items that they can reach and bite such as electrical cords by using cords protectors. Safely store detergents and other household cleaners in locked cabinets or high on a shelf. Be aware that trash cans can also be dangerous for their consumption, consider a closed-lid trash can instead. Prevent falls and kitchen fires by not allowing pets in the kitchen when cooking or when stove is on.
  4. Invest in a video surveillance security to keep track of what your dog does at home when you are not around. View live footage of your pets from work or anytime you are away from home, ensuring they are okay and not in any danger.
  5. It is common for pets to accidentally trigger home security motion detectors and cause false alarms. This is dangerous because an emergency personnel may not know if it is a real threat or if a pet triggered the alarm. The best way to prevent this is to ensure your system accommodates animals during the installation stage.

For additional safety information and security system installation, contact Wayne Alarm by calling us at: 781-595-0000 or visiting us online at www.waynealarm.com.

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Wayne Alarm: Be safe in your apartment

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

Apartment fire are much more common than we all might like to think, which is a little frightening to think about. Whether your residence is a single-family home or an apartment, it’s important to take the calm and proper steps that can save your life. The majority of fire are results of kitchen/cooking, heating equipments such as space heaters, and even arson which includes children at times playing with fire.

So you might ask yourself: Well, I live in an apartment. What can I do if I’m ever in this situation?

Performing a fire inspection and ensuring that everything is up-to-code can make a big difference. Here are some tips to ensure you are prepared and safe in case of any fire emergency:

Make sure all exit and stairwell doors are marked, not locked or blocked by security bars.
It’s very important to know the locations of all exit stairs from your floor level, in case you need to get out in an emergency.
If there are not a number of adequate working smoke detectors and fire extinguishers, contact your landlord.
If ever stuck inside your apartment and you can’t find any exit, try to stuff wet towels or sheets around the door and vents. This helps to keep the smoke out.
Here are some ways to ensure that you stay safe on a daily basis throughout your apartment:

Don’t leave cooking food unattended
Always ensure that your stove or oven is off if you’re not in the room or leaving your apartment. It’s also very, very important to never use your oven as a source to heat your home.
Make sure there’s a three feet distance with household combustibles from heating equipments: space heaters, fireplace, or wood stoves. In addition turn portable heaters off when leaving a room or going to bed.
Replace any worn electrical cords. Use power strips if additional outlets are needed.
If using an electric space heater, use a heavy-duty cord of 14-gauge wire or larger. Otherwise, avoid using one at all cost.
Test smoke alarms at least once a month.
Unless specified, don’t use electric space heaters in damp, wet areas.
It’s very important to always be aware of using the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.

In case you ever do find yourself in a fire:

Always check doors before opening them. If the door feels cool, open it slowly and stay low to the ground and leave the building as soon as possible. If the door is warm, use wet towels or beddings to seal the door and vets. Proceed to a window, and if there is no smoke outside, signal for help. If you are able to, call 9-1-1 and make them aware that you are trapped in the building.

Don’t ever use an elevator during a fire. Always use the stairs!

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www.waynealarm.com

Cooking with the stars

COURTESY PHOTO
You’ll enjoy making and serving these savory meat empanadas. The recipe below makes about eight of the tasty turnovers.

By ROSALIE HARRINGTON

My mother-in-law enjoys art best when she’s painting with a friend, and so do I. Her art is with paint and canvas, mine is with pots and whisks.

I get it when she tells me how much she enjoys sharing the time at the easel with someone who understands what she’s up to and they can share ideas and opinions.  I have the same good feeling at the stove.  Over the years, I have enjoyed cooking with people, whether with my cooking classes, demonstrating a new gadget at Bloomingdales, or just one-on-one with a friend.

Cooking makes me happy.  

On Monday last week, I had surgery. I didn’t like that I was laid up, to recover, for a few days. I was deprived of my normal routine, which I love, starting with my first cup of coffee in the morning. What will I make today I contemplate as I sip?  My body needed rest, however, so I was temporarily robbed of the rituals of healthy life.  

I was feeling a little down despite the benefit of having my head into a good book, a memoir by Alec Guinness, “The Name Escapes Me,” that made me laugh the first time I read it 20 years ago. But now it was a little too close to home. “Is the piercing of an old man’s life worth the pains?” asks Elia of Alec? Certainly not, replied Guinness without hesitation. After my recovery week, I was inclined to agree.  

Sunday morning my energy returned. Inspired by an overpriced little bag of granola I’d seen in a favorite Cambridge bakery, Flour, I figured for the $10 they were charging I could make three pounds. That’s all I need for inspiration, so I couldn’t wait to get to work. Well, no, not work – to me it’s really play.  

Thirty minutes later, with the help of the Cuisinart, everything was done, including the baking. By the time my husband Todd was home from his workout at the Y, he was welcomed with a big, warm bowl of granola.

I also made made some empanadas, making a filling with a combo package of ground beef, veal and pork from Market Basket with olives. The pastry recipe was foolproof, so easy to roll out and the filling was so good I was tasting it for far too long.  I love cheating on our vegetarian diet, especially when Todd is out, since he takes it seriously.

I will serve empanadas with a grilled Caesar salad and a Greek Lemon and Rice Soup that I love to eat when I am supposedly eating light.

Getaways close to home

There have been many celebrities in my cooking life.  When I was a so-called “Celebrity Chef” for the retail company Homeplace, which didn’t survive, sadly, I cooked with some fun people. Homeplace was a warehouse concept owned by the Staples group that sold kitchen goods. During grand openings at new stores in the Northeast, I would do cooking demonstrations with a big name celebrity to draw in the crowds.

Regis Philbin was a huge star at the time and he drew a gigantic crowd. I met him at the back door in Connecticut and he greeted me warmly with “So you’re the famous chef from Boston?” The crowd loved him and he told me some cute stories about entertaining, with wife Joy doing the cooking. We gave away copies of their cookbook.

Country singer Naomi Judd was so beautiful I found it distracting. Her face was like a china doll and she was sweet and kind of scared. After a few minutes, though, she relaxed, and it was all good. There is something about the intimacy that cooking provides that makes people feel safe.  

I had the same observation about beauty when I cooked with Diane Sawyer when she appeared on the “Look” TV show I hosted on Channel 7. Sawyer was lovely to look at and she was confident and accommodated the conversation like the pro that she is.  

One of my favorite celebrities was Nat King Cole’s daughter, Natalie.  She was fun and charming and we were relaxed with one another. It was wonderful to hear her stories about growing up with her famous dad, whose music I loved. That small personal experience made it sad to hear of her death last year.

The Von Trapp family from “Sound of Music” fame cooked with me, the whole family as I recall, and they were wonderful.  You could tell that they were used to being in the spotlight. A beautiful, warm group.

Vincent Price, an old-time actor, was a true gentleman. He gave me an autographed copy of his book about cooking for the Hollywood crowd.

There is something special about just being together in the kitchen, no matter; it breaks down all barriers. When my friend MaryLou invited me to join her in bread-making one day last year, we were interrupted by the refrigerator repair guy. The scene quickly turned into a bit that “Saturday Night Live” could have used. His muscular body pushed out the fridge, and behind it he found an antique wooden spatula that ignited sparks in me. He had a gorgeous body, which we both noticed – especially his arms, which when flexed were a sight to behold and not lost on us – two old-with-aprons gals. Marylou gave me the wooden tool, similar to a pastry knife; it makes me smile whenever I see it in the kitchen.


Meat Empanadas    

These are savory turnovers that you’ll enjoy making and serving. This recipe will make eight or nine five-inch circles.

For the dough:

Place 2 cups of flour and ½ teaspoon salt in the food processor.  Pulse it a bit to combine. Add 3 tablespoons vegetable shortening; pulse to disperse.

In a bowl, beat 1 egg with 1/4 cup of cold water and slowly add it to the processor through the chute. The dough should form a ball; if it doesn’t, add a little more water until it does.  

Wrap dough with wax paper and refrigerate it while you make the filling.  

Hard-boil 2 eggs. You need only 1, but while you’re at it, make an extra.  

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a saute pan and add 1 small red onion chopped; cook till soft.  

Add 1/2 pound of ground meat. (I love the combination of veal, pork and beef for meatballs and meatloaf.) Chop away at it with a wooden spoon to brown all over.

With a strainer, collect the fat. Add just the meat to a bowl with a sprinkle or two of cinnamon and nutmeg, salt and the egg ground up in the processor.  

Add 1/4 cup of pitted, chopped black olives and the cooked red onion.

Set aside and roll out the dough on a floured board into a large circle about 12 to 14 inches in diameter.  

Using a bowl or a glass about 5 inches round, cut out about 8 circles, gathering the leftover dough to make more.  

Place 1 heaping tablespoon of meat filling in the center of each circle. Wet with your finger the outer edge of the circle, fold the dough over and press it to seal the edges. Pierce with a fork to allow the heat to escape.  

Reform any leftover dough, brush each with olive oil and bake on a lightly-oiled cookie sheet in a preheated 425 degree oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until nicely browned.

Serve with chopped basil or cilantro and a bowl of sour cream or yogurt.  

Be healthy and happy.           

Cruising through the holidays

COURTESY PHOTO
The recipe for kale, cannellini beans and fresh tomatoes in broth, pictured, can be found below.

By ROSALIE HARRINGTON

My parents lived for cruises.

When my mother searched for the perfect dress to wear to the captain’s dinner, she started in my closet.

“But mom, that’s a size eight and you are a 12,” I’d argue.

“It’ll be fine,” she would reply, signaling her mind was made up.

She would leave my house with a suitcase packed with anything formal she could find. What she would wear every night for dinner, the social high point of each cruise day, was important. But nothing compared to what she would need for dining and socializing at the captain’s table.

My parents were a charming couple on the high seas and met friends aboard ship. The dresses that I would normally wear on a Saturday night at Rosalie’s, as I would do my waltz around the dining room greeting diners and keeping tabs on the service, played a role.  

Before she left on a cruise, I would tease her about how she shouldn’t feel badly that I had nothing to wear for two weeks, just as long as she was happy and well-dressed for the capitano.

On a Mediterranean cruise, my parents met the Brown family.  For weeks after they arrived home, I heard constant chatter about how the Browns got to know their Greek relatives.

Food just one part of the fun

Years later, when Todd and I moved to Manchester by the Sea, my mother said the Browns were from Manchester and insisted I look them up. After two dozen inquiries, I found one of the couples and surprised my parents with a lunch date with them in Manchester. They had a great time reliving all the stops on the cruise and were immensely happy with the reunion.

Cooking classes at my house in Manchester brought together a wonderful group, including a couple named Rus and Erica Brown. I told these younger Browns about my parents meeting their relatives and how much fun we all had at the recent lunch.  We have been best friends over the dozen years since, often cooking meals together. They played a very important role when Todd and I got married several years ago after 25 years together.  Rus ordered me the most beautiful wedding bouquet, Erica was the photographer and they stood up for us.

After the wedding at our cottage, the four of us dined at a Boston restaurant owned by chef Lydia Shire, where we had one of the most spectacular meals. When we recently had dinner together, Rus and Erica, Todd and I, with others at Lydia’s home, Rus reminded her of the occasion. It was very special. I often remind Rus and Erica of how they were a one-stop wedding service providing witnesses, flowers, photography and dinner — not to mention the fabulous company.  

Recently I repaid Rus. His generous spirit often gets him involved in charitable affairs. One such event is a dinner he hosts for the Council for the Elderly in Manchester each Christmas season for 60 people. He shops, cooks, serves, decorates and organizes volunteers to help organize the party together every year. I helped him with the cooking about five years ago and passed during the intervening years due to remembering how much work it was the last time.

This year, however, enough years had gone by for the memory to fade sufficiently for me to volunteer again for last week’s meal, and it was a long day of cooking, carving and serving alongside several wonderful people. Erica was there too, having made the all-important stuffing and bringing her boys along to help serve the food, so we had a great day. After a visit with my chiropractor who realigned me after cooking and carving four 20-pound turkeys and plating for more than 50 diners, my back is healing. Rus called to thank me for my help and assured me he could not have done it without me. His final words: “I am reminded of how much work it must be to run a restaurant.”  

I took a carcass from one of the four turkeys home to make soup, which led to a wonderful broth. I used the last of it to create a kale, cannellini bean and fresh tomato soup. The secret of a good soup is to simmer the carcass with carrot, celery and onion, fresh rosemary, thyme and a bay leaf. Drain all of this after two hours and chop fresh veggies and add to the simmered strained broth. Save some of your broth for deglazing with Marsala, or just enjoy some broken angel hair simmered in the broth. The house will be filled with good aromas and your stomach will love the comfort food.   

A few days after we served dinner for the town, we joined the extended Brown family for another lovely Christmas dinner at Rus and Erica’’s house Sunday. Someday I must remember to ask Rus’s father how a nice Greek family got the name Brown. As I write this, Bing Crosby is singing Silent Night on the radio and for some reason I am in tears. Maybe it’s about writing about my parents and missing them or because the grandsons have been away for the last 10 days. Whatever the cause, the carols are killing me this year.      

Shopping well means eating well

As they should be, the holidays are synonymous with food. Last week I enjoyed eating at Superfine Food, a new restaurant in Manchester. Lunch, breakfast and dinner, not all the same day, has been delicious. My friend Susie and I had lunch there recently and reminisced about not so long ago when what is now a fine food casual restaurant where you order at the counter and then wait for everything to be delivered to your table was a diner called Christo’s.

We had a great time exchanging gifts. Susie said that from now on when we meet every week for lunch she only wants to go to Superfine. Yesterday I met with my friend, Sally, at our favorite Italian hangout, Caffe Sicilia on Main Street in Gloucester, where I enjoyed a cappuccino and a sfogliatelle, known in English as a lobster tail, which consists of pastry layers filled with a ricotta center. We enjoyed the ambience and the delectable pastry while we talked to the owner from Sicily. He sat with us and shared stories of his life before coming to America.  

I’m not sure what we’ll do for New Year’s. But if it’s like every year since closing the restaurant, we’ll be in bed by 9:30 or so. But I’m sure we’ll do some entertaining, perhaps have friends over for brunch, and hopefully be invited to fun events that happen early and eat more great food. Making memories, my favorite past time, usually includes some delightful flavors.  Happy New Year, my friends.


Kale, cannellini beans and fresh tomatoes in broth

— Wash and cut up a bunch of kale, discarding the heavyish ribs.  

— In a heavy soup pot heat three tbsp. of olive oil or four dashes of bacon or pancetta cut up. In any case you will need about three tbsp. fat or oil.  

— Add three cloves of peeled and chopped garlic and a small red onion chopped and sweat them for about five minutes over medium heat.  

— Wash and puree in food processor about two cups of grape tomatoes or three large tomatoes. Add to the soup pot and place a sprig each of rosemary and thyme and a tsp. salt in as well.

— Add two cups of homemade or canned chicken broth and bring to a simmer. Add the kale, cover the pan and cook for about 15 minutes. Add a small can of washed and drained cannellini beans, stir and simmer for another few minutes. At this point you can add any leftover cooked sausage or ham (about a cup).

— Serve with a nice crusty bread and a green salad with cut up apple and walnuts.

Great cooking starts with great ingredients

COURTESY PHOTO
When you make your lasagna, set aside one cup or so of the ricotta for this quick and delicious treat the next day. See recipe below.

By ROSALIE HARRINGTON

Moving to Marblehead was a big adjustment back in the late ’60s. I remember telling my grandmother, my noni, that I would probably be picking her up at her house in the Beachmont section of Revere so I could buy some staples at her grocery store, Cerretani’s.

So many of the foods I wanted just weren’t available at Penni’s market, the only grocery store in my new town. No ricotta, no anchovies, no squid, no Parmesan cheese in wedges that I could grate myself. The selection of dried pasta was pathetic. Prosciutto, Genoa salami, good olive oil, balsamic vinegar, real garlic were nowhere to be found.  

Shopping well means eating well

Noni loved the idea of being picked up for grocery shopping anywhere, especially in the North End. We would make special trips there for a prosciutto bone, which she would use as a base for her minestrone, as well as Italian sausages, rabbit, pancetta, Italian cheese, real bread, olives and all those wonderful imported goodies from Italy. The fresh ricotta came in metal cans with holes in them for drainage. It was at the corner store near my Uncle Frank’s fish market, Giuffre’s. We had to have the sheets of homemade lasagna noodles from Trio Ravioli on Hanover Street.

Eventually, the staff at Penni’s tired of me asking for various foods and started to supply some of my necessities. In the ’80s, when I was Food editor of the “Look” TV show on Channel 7, we made a film of me shopping at the DDL Foodshow in New York. Dino DeLaurentiis, the filmmaker, created the most beautiful retail space in a vast warehouse.  There were boutiques, each one specializing in something different like pasta, chocolate, cheese, olive oil, charcuterie and every imaginable product from Italy.  It was a very innovative and sexy space and I loved it.

DDL didn’t last, but now we have Eataly by Mario Batali, well established in New York City but now open in the Prudential Center in Boston. I’ll make my first visit there this week, which should be exciting.

People have been raving about Eataly, but I am quick to point out that it is not an original idea, even though I am a big fan of Mario. Years ago, my husband Todd and I interviewed him for a radio segment at his Greenwich Village restaurant. He arrived with his son in a stroller and cooked us a delicious, simple dish of chickpeas quickly sauteed in garlic and oil, a few red pepper flakes and a dash of broth served over linguine with lots of Pecorino Romano sprinkled on top. His first restaurant impressed me for its coziness, but most important was his presence, which I have missed as he’s become more successful.     

Holiday party becomes Item Santa fundraiser

So many exciting things have happened with food in the past 30 years. I remember when I went to Italy for the first time on my honeymoon and I euphoric about the food, the pasta, the bread, the sauces. Great bread was unheard of here, in the land of Wonder, but now we have the most wonderful breads, better perhaps than you’ll find in France or Italy. It is still great to visit various countries, but it is amazing what is available to us here.

And Boston is a leader in the ongoing food revolution, in which the creativity and flexibility has made chefs in this country as good as any on the planet. A few weeks ago, our good friend Rus Brown hosted a birthday party for his wife, Erica, at the home of chef Lydia Shire on Marlborough Street in Boston. Lydia made her name at the Bostonian Hotel 30 years ago, but has had a huge impact in the years since with such restaurants as  Biba, Scampo and Towne Stove & Spirits. For a few years, Lydia had a restaurant in Maine where Todd and I travelled just to indulge in her lobster or lamb pizza. We were thrilled to see that delightful item on the birthday menu last week.

The pizza was followed by pumpkin agnolotti, Cape scallops with bacon and bourbon, a salad of burrata, beets and dates, and a choice of halibut or Wagyu sirloin, green bean tempura and finally a dessert of Pavlova with lemon cream. We are still talking about the meal, it was so fabulous. Lydia is one of the top chefs in the country, but as a woman she doesn’t seem to receive the recognition she deserves, in my opinion.

On one of my first visits to Sicily, my cousins took me to see ricotta being made by a local farmer. It was fascinating to see the primitive process.  The milk simmered in a caldron over a wood-burning fire outside his tiny barn. The curds separated and then it was poured into baskets that took on its shape after it cooled down. We had some local honey and homemade bread with the ricotta that afternoon with our espresso; it was so good.

When I started my restaurant, I decided that ravioli could be stuffed with not just ricotta, but also with lobster. No one had done this, I believe, but we were living on the coast with lobsters readily available. In Italy they use what’s abundant around them. Todd and I still talk about being in the hazelnut region of Italy 30 years ago and having a fancy meal in which every item of every course in some way included hazelnut. Anyway, the lobster ravioli were a big hit and they became one of Rosalie’s most popular dishes.

Last weekend, we had our friends Sally and Bruce over, and I made a lasagna with béchamel, Bolognese meat sauce and ricotta and mozzarella in layers. Once upon a time I wouldn’t have dreamed of making a lasagna with noodles that were not fresh, but I discovered the pasta that you don’t have to boil and it is so much easier. And it is good!

I love how versatile ricotta is. I made a smallish lasagna, so I used some of the ricotta to make my favorite, easy ricotta pudding.


Ricotta Pudding      

  • When you make your lasagna, set aside 1 cup or so of the ricotta for this quick and delicious treat the next day: You don’t want to get too filled up on the cheese in one meal, after all.  
  • The large container of ricotta requires about 3 eggs beaten with it for your lasagna. Remove about 1 1/2 cup of this mixture and place in a small bowl to use for the pudding.
  • Mix with 1 teaspoon of vanilla or almond extract and about 1/3 cup of sugar, depending on your tastebuds.
  • Butter a soufflé dish or any oven-to-table casserole you have. Sprinkle about 1 cup of chocolate chips on the bottom, or: mix 1 cup of berries with about 3 tablespoons of sugar and sprinkle them over the bottom. (If you have individual ramekins, it makes a very nice presentation.)
  • Next, pour the ricotta mixture into your casserole.  
  • Decorate the top with berries or chocolate chips, whichever you like.  
  • Place your casserole dish (or individual ramekins) into a baking pan and pour water about halfway up the height of the pudding dish.
  • Bake in a 325 degree oven until the ricotta is set. Serve with a little sweetened whipped cream.      

All Care: Caring for your loved one at Home

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www.allcare.org

Because there’s no place like home. It’s memories of your past, comfort in the present, and the place you want to be, living independently- now and in the future.

If you or a loved one need assistance living at home, All Care is here to help you.

For over 100 years, All Care has provided exceptional home care services.  Our goal is to help you maintain a high quality of life, stay active, safe and living as independently as possible in the comfort of your home.  All Care serves 50 communities throughout the North Shore, Greater Boston and Merrimack Valley with a full continuum of home care services that transition seamlessly with each other to fulfill your needs at every level of care.  We offer solutions, assistance and peace of mind with a personalized plan of care for you through:

All Care Visiting Nurse Association:

Professional nursing care and rehabilitation therapies

All Care Hospice:

Comfort and compassionate end of life care

Palliative Care/Bridge to Hospice Program:

Pain management, education, and support

All Care Resources/Private Pay Care:

Supportive care for daily life at home

Ask for All Care… because there’s no place like home.

www.allcare.org

For ALL your home care needs.     Call:   781-598-7066

Calling all cooks

Does the woman down the street make a bolognese to die for? Does the man at work bake a mean blueberry pie? Are your mama’s quesadillas or creative salads better than any you’ve had in a restaurant? Is there a star in your cooking club whose creations always draw “oohs” and “aahs?” If so, we’d love to meet and feature them and a favorite recipe in our new weekly Neighborhood Cooks column on our Food page. Please introduce us by contacting Features Editor Bill Brotherton at bbrotherton@itemlive.com or 781-593-7700, ext. 1338.

All Care: Caring for your loved one at Home

all-care-vna-logo

www.allcare.org

Because there’s no place like home. It’s memories of your past, comfort in the present, and the place you want to be, living independently- now and in the future.

If you or a loved one need assistance living at home, All Care is here to help you.

For over 100 years, All Care has provided exceptional home care services.  Our goal is to help you maintain a high quality of live, stay active, safe and living as independently as possible in the comfort of your home.  All Care serves 50 communities throughout the North Shore, Greater Boston and Merrimack Valley with a full continuum of home care services that transition seamlessly with each other to fulfill your needs at every level of care.  We offer solutions, assistance and peace of mind with a personalized plan of care for you through:

All Care Visiting Nurse Association:

Professional nursing care and rehabilitation therapies

All Care Hospice:

Comfort and compassionate end of life care

Palliative Care/Bridge to Hospice Program:

Pain management, education, and support

All Care Resources/Private Pay Care:

Supportive care for daily life at home

Ask for All Care… because there’s no place like home.

www.allcare.org

For ALL your home care needs.     Call:   781-598-7066

All Care: Caring for your loved one at Home

all-care-vna-logo

www.allcare.org

Because there’s no place like home. It’s memories of your past, comfort in the present, and the place you want to be, living independently- now and in the future.

If you or a loved one need assistance living at home, All Care is here to help you.

For over 100 years, All Care has provided exceptional home care services.  Our goal is to help you maintain a high quality of live, stay active, safe and living as independently as possible in the comfort of your home.  All Care serves 50 communities throughout the North Shore, Greater Boston and Merrimack Valley with a full continuum of home care services that transition seamlessly with each other to fulfill your needs at every level of care.  We offer solutions, assistance and peace of mind with a personalized plan of care for you through:

All Care Visiting Nurse Association:

Professional nursing care and rehabilitation therapies

All Care Hospice:

Comfort and compassionate end of life care

Palliative Care/Bridge to Hospice Program:

Pain management, education, and support

All Care Resources/Private Pay Care:

Supportive care for daily life at home

Ask for All Care… because there’s no place like home.

www.allcare.org

For ALL your home care needs.     Call:   781-598-7066

 

From yoga to welding, a community enriched

From left, Cody Maher and Kaleb Allen being enthusiastic about welding class.

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN — The Lynn Community Enrichment Program is wrapping up this week, after seeing success in its first session.

Tony Dunn is the program coordinator of the night courses at Lynn Vocational and Technical Institute, which were offered three evenings a week, over a winter session that began on Jan. 25. He said the first semester of doing the program was a success, with over 100 people — 18 years of age and older — enrolled in 14 different classes.

Dunn said the spring session will begin on May 2, with 20 courses offered and 17 teachers participating.

“We’re going to do it as long as the need is out there,” Dunn said. “Hopefully it will grow. We want it to grow in the vocational aspect and be a chief resource for people to learn about different careers and find a way into those careers.”

Courses offered in the winter session included oil burner technician, milling machine operation, welding, introduction to the internet, conversational English and Spanish, yoga, cake decorating and cooking.

“People were very happy to get out of their homes and do something,” Dunn said. “They learned something that isn’t available to them normally. It’s an opportunity to learn skills they may develop into jobs in the future.”

Dunn said yoga was the most well-received class offered over the winter.

“Everyone raved about how peaceful and calm it made them feel,” he said.

Dunn said the courses are only six weeks in length and tuition is $60. Courses offered in the spring will include a writing course for people who would like to write their memoirs or a novel,

introduction to lathe, carpentry, a course to teach people how to be a nanny, CPR and first aid, and computer application in Spanish.

Initially, as a committee for the program, Dunn said it was thought that doing a spring session would be rushing the program. However, he said the enthusiastic response has told him to keep going. He said School Superintendent Dr. Catherine Latham has been instrumental in moving the program forward.

With the success, Dunn said the opportunity is there for three sessions a year in the future.

“We’re excited about it and hope people are too,” he said.


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley