communication

Wayne Alarm: 4 reasons to get Total Connect

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

There are times when security alarms aren’t enough to secure our homes and our business, and with technologic advances, using video security changes that. It adds extra security by allowing you to see what is happening around your home and motion activated events that can occur in and around your business. Here are four reasons why having a video surveillance is the best monitor to have.

  1. Wayne Alarm has notifications set up that work with video surveillance. If your camera detects a motion activated event, you are then automatically notified with an e-mail of the event or push notification on your mobile device, which allows you to monitor what occurred at a real time and date.
  2. Wayne Alarm Systems uses Honeywell Total Connect Cameras, allows you to stream videos live straight from the Total Connect directly to your phone, tablet or computer giving you an extra layer of protection. The cameras are portable, so changing locations to monitor new areas is easy. With infrared technology, which enhances your ability to see in the dark, records 10 second clips of a motion activates event and then sends it to you to investigate.
  3. With new technology such as SkyBell, we can help prevent break-ins into your business and home. When you’re a SkyBell owner, you receive a ring whenever the doorbell is pressed, or even have it alert you whenever it senses motion such as someone walks up to your front door. This allows you to remotely stream live video from your iPhone or iPad and interact with whoever is at your front door directly via two way communication. With extremely durable functions for weather, it gives you high definition video and full color night vision.
  4. There is strong data that suggest surveillance of employees in small business can boost productivity and profits. Allowing you to stay in control of dishonest claims, maintain the safety in your work environment and allows you as the manager to spend more time in more productive ways.

Having the best security is a top request everyone seeks for their home and business. With Total Connect video, it gives you enhanced security that allows you to stay on top of whatever happens in your environment, and giving you the added layer of protection that you want.

 

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Saugus eatery has family feuding

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Jeffrey Floramo is set to open a new restaurant at the site of the now-closed Papagayo.

By BRIDGET TURCOTTE

SAUGUS — Rumors that meat will be falling off the bone in Saugus have strengthened in the past week, but Chelsea’s Floramo’s Restaurant owner maintains he is not affiliated with a new business planned for Route 1 South.

A restaurant, owned by Jeffrey Floramo, will open at the former site of Papagayo, a Mexican restaurant and tequila bar that closed earlier this year, at 817 Broadway in August.

Floramo told the Saugus Board of Selectmen Wednesday that he anticipates his menu will be “very similar to the existing Floramo menu and what we had at Clubhouse Cafe.”

Hungry customers will feast on barbeque, marinated steak tips, ribs, and Italian chicken parmesan, he said.  

But John Floramo, the owner of the well-known Floramo’s in Chelsea, maintains that the incoming restaurant has no affiliation with his family’s business.

John Floramo told The Item Friday that, though Jeffrey Floramo is his cousin, there is no affiliation between his family’s restaurant and the eatery slated to open on Route 1.

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“He has said he’s going to duplicate our menu — we don’t know how he’s going to do that,” he said.

In a post on the Floramo’s Facebook page, he wrote: “We at Floramo’s Restaurant are aware of the rumors that we are moving to Route 1 in Saugus. Apparently there are some individuals that are claiming to be affiliated with our family and our business and saying that they possess the same menu that we have so we would like to set the record straight for those of you that are inquiring.

“Floramo’s has only ever been owned by two people. One being our founder, Thomas J. (Tommy) Floramo. The second being his son, the current and sole owner, John Thomas Floramo. Floramo’s Restaurant does not have partners, silent or otherwise and never has, despite untrue claims. The only owner and President is John Floramo.

“We are not moving and are not opening a second location and our menu and recipes are Tommy and John’s and cannot be duplicated. We appreciate all your loyal patronage over the last 3 (almost 4) decades and we look forward to many more.”

Jeffrey Floramo initially requested the establishment to be called Floramo’s Clubhouse but removed the request from the application Wednesday.

“We received some communication from a family member of Mr. Floramo indicating they did not want the use of the name Floramo’s Clubhouse and on our application, we had that as a ‘doing business as,’” said attorney Richard Magnan, who represents Jeffrey Floramo. “I filed a letter with (the board) today, making the requested to you we be allowed to amend our applications to delete that reference.”

A name for the new restaurant will be determined at a later date.


Bridget Turcotte can be reached at bturcotte@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @BridgetTurcotte

Oxford IOP offers extra support in recovery

ITEM PHOTO BY SPENSER HASAK
Oxford IOP Clinical Director Joseph Lemieux and Program Assistant Director Sheana Grieves discuss goals of the program.

By GAYLA CAWLEY

LYNN — Oxford Intensive Outpatient Recovery Program is focused on life after drug and alcohol detox, creating an extra level of support for those in the early stages of recovery.

“It’s not enough to detox,” said Susan Spano, co-founder and administrator of Oxford IOP, as the program more commonly goes by. “You’ve got to do a lot more than that.”

Oxford IOP, which provides an extra level of support for those who may feel residential programs are not right for them, opened last October, but will mark its grand opening on June 20 from 3:30-6:30 p.m. at its office, 173 Oxford St.

Spano said the point of the event was to let people know that the program is there and that it is important. Invitations have been sent out to police and fire departments, along with personnel from probation, parole and drug court, according to Sheana Grieves, program assistant director.

Spano said the drug and alcohol rehabilitation and recovery center is a branch of Psychiatric Associates of Lynn, also located in the same building. Psych Associates provides the resource of vivitrol and suboxone, which are used for opioid detox. The idea was to keep everything under the same roof, so patients can go from Psych Associates to Oxford IOP for continued treatment, Grieves added.

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Spano said people must be almost detoxed completely when they come to Oxford IOP, or should be pretty clean — they can’t be there if they’re using. Typically, clients include those who are addicted to alcohol, heroin, fentanyl, crack cocaine, and pain medication. She said the program is unique, as the attitude toward recovery is really different — patients are recovering from a holistic body and brain point of view.

Through a longer period of time in a program like the IOP with someone not using, she said the brain starts to reset itself and people begin to think more clearly and understand a lot more. She said the goal is to keep them in the program for three months, but provided program information detailing that clients typically stay for two to four weeks.

Joseph Lemieux, clinical director, said practices are done with mindfulness, thought reconstruction, reintegrating into the community, social skills, communication and how to cope with triggers both internally and externally.

He said the focus is on getting them reintegrated back into life so they can function normally. In addition, he said staff works really hard to find other care for them, including weekly therapy, and connecting them with social workers to help them with other needs they may have. In other words, he said it was about giving them stuff to do so they don’t do the stuff that got them there in the first place.

Spano said part of the opioid crisis is people may say there’s no place to go after their child got detoxed. It can be a revolving door with people detoxing, going back on the street, picking up again and going back into detox again, Grieves added. Spano said the program was created as the need was recognized, that it was very clear there wasn’t a place people go when they got better.

“This is where people can go when they’re detoxed and ready to get back into the world,” Spano said.


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley.

 

Wayne Alarm: Why Medical Alert is best

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

Grandma has been feeling ill for quite some time now, and living home alone doesn’t give you or your family  peace of mind. What if you’re currently at work, kids are at school, and grandma had an accident and fell?What if she had no way of being able to reach you or call for help. It’s a situation we don’t want to have to deal with and it’s an event we all want to prevent. How can she reach out in case of an emergency? How can you know if she’s okay? How will she be able to alert you when she needs help?

Today, with technological advances, we are able to find ways to help in situations like this while being in control of our outcome.

When needed, professional Medical Life Alert operators are able to aid in assistance at anytime, from anywhere. With 24/7 monitoring, they standby at a local monitoring station. The easy-to-access emergency button provided immediately alerts the Wayne Alarm Alarm Monitoring Central Station. The best part about it, if you or your loved one are in another room or enjoying the outdoors, a wireless remote activator allows you to activate the system when you are away from the main receiver.

At the moment of alert, you’ll be in contact with a dispatcher giving you high quality communication that allows you to be heard clearly from any room, regardless of the distance. In the time being, an appropriate emergency personnel is then contacted and dispatched to your aid wherever help is needed.

Our loved ones can now have the ability to have more freedom and independence within their home, even while still having the help of a qualified and trained group of professionals standing by whenever you need help. For more questions, give us a call at (781)595-0000 or e-mail us at sales@waynealarm.com

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Blueprint could help close ‘achievement gap’

COURTESY PHOTO
Legislators want to help increase third grade reading proficiency rates.

By STEVE FREKER

MALDEN — A group of  state senators have launched what they believe is a strategic blueprint to raise reading proficiency in third graders statewide, and enhance their lives overall.

Two local legislators, Sen. Jason Lewis, D-5th Middlesex, Malden, and Sen. Sal DiDomenico, D-Everett, Cambridge,  are among the Senate’s Kids First working group, commissioned last October by Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, D-Amherst.

To dramatically increase third grade reading proficiency rates and support the whole child, the Senate’s Kids First initiative has established four broad areas to focus specific strategies: Access, Quality, Readiness, and Integration.

“I am proud of the comprehensive vision put forth in the Kids First blueprint,” said Lewis.  “In it, the Senate makes a vital commitment to the fundamental integration of services in critical areas including mental health and social-emotional learning.  

“The social-emotional learning component of Kids First is essential to strengthening the critical thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills of our young people.  Kids First will serve as an invaluable guide, and it was a privilege to serve on the working group.”

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Lewis said the Kids First working group invited experts in diverse fields including early childhood development, health, education, housing, and nutrition, among others, to share their knowledge through questionnaires, meetings, and presentations.

Kids First announced it has tackled the challenges of the fact 40 percent of Massachusetts third graders are not reading at that grade level, with the number sharply rising to 60 percent among low-income students.

According to the Kids First report, the lack of reading proficiency creates “a growing achievement gap” for the future and action is needed immediately. The group proposes to reduce by half the number of third graders lacking grade level proficiency by the year 2027.

DiDomenico, chairman of the Kids First initiative, said the plan laid out in Kids First is not meant as a blueprint for a series of legislative initiatives or any piece of legislation in particular.  “It is offered as a statement of the Senate’s vision for children and a statement of budgetary priorities in the years to come,” DiDomenico said.

Saugus promotes new vision for schools

By THOR JOURGENSEN

SAUGUS — Town officials are organizing a June election in which residents will be asked “to support and invest” in a sweeping local school reorganization featuring a middle-high school district-wide facility.  

The plan, tentatively discussed to date with town educators and parents, proposes several significant changes. A grade 6-12 middle-high school is at the center of the plan.  Belmonte Middle School would be established as an “upper elementary school” for grades 3, 4 and 5, and Veterans Memorial Elementary School would become a “lower elementary school” for pre-kindergarten to grade 2.

“This is a real opportunity for the Town of Saugus to meet the goals of its educational plan,” said Town Manager Scott Crabtree. “Challenging our students to reach their full potential necessitates that our schools have the resources and facilities to meet the academic needs of all students and prepare them for success should they pursue higher education or compete in today’s workforce.”  

The proposed middle-high school complex will total 270,000 total square feet including a 12,000 square-foot gymnasium and capacity for 1,360 students in grades 6-12. There will be state-of-the-art science labs and technology classrooms, fine and performing arts classrooms and a 750-seat auditorium.

In addition, the proposal includes a new sports complex and outdoor track, walking paths, outdoor classrooms, and student gardens. Veterans Memorial Elementary School and Belmonte Middle School will also receive construction updates.

A town statement outlining the proposed school changes emphasized their potential to move the Saugus public school system’s status under state education rankings from from a Level 3 to a Level 1 school district.

Profiles in courage

The statement says the proposed reconfiguration is also intended to provide fair and equal access to all students enabling them to reach their highest potential and to continue to prioritize education.

The proposal’s school building improvements are also intended to maintain accreditation with New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and address address health and safety issues including identified deficiencies in fire protection, sprinkler systems, and disability access compliance.

“Providing our students and staff with resources and facilities that achieves the vision of our Town’s educational plan is critical,” said Superintendent of Schools Dr. David DeRuosi. “This solution will facilitate a shift from teacher-centered to student-centered instruction, and an emphasis on the critical thinking, communication and technology skills needed to enhance 21st century skills our students need to be successful.”

The proposal’s additional elements include new science labs that meet state educational and safety standards. Building designs include work spaces for student collaboration and project-based learning in all subject areas; and shared instructional resources and opportunities for increased teacher collaboration.  

The town statement lists no specific June date for bringing the proposal before voters.

“This middle-high school district-wide solution is critical for the residents of Saugus because it will enhance our children’s education and change the way education is valued and delivered in the community,” said Jeanette Meredith, School Committee chairwoman and Saugus High School Project Building Committee.

Workshops to assist dementia caregivers

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN — More than 5 million Americans are living with dementia and the disease affects nearly 1,600 Lynn residents.

Greater Lynn Senior Services (GLIS) is hosting a series of free workshops on Thursday, May 11 to assist caregivers.

Dubbed “Joining Hands Day,” the sessions will be held at the Lynn Museum and led by the Hearthstone Institute. The Woburn nonprofit has offered training for more than two decades.

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Among the offerings include “Caregiver Training” which focuses on caregivers.C “Community Training” is on how the city can help.

GLSS said it’s important to recognize the signs and symptoms of dementia and learn simple communication skills that can help people living with the disease and their care partners.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.

School committee members seek 2nd term

COURTESY PHOTOS
Pictured is Gargi Cooper, left, and Suzanne Wright.

By GAYLA CAWLEY

SWAMPSCOTT — Two incumbents vying to retain their seats on the School Committee are stressing the importance of continuity and consistency on the board. One challenger argues that there needs to be more transparency and communication from the committee.

Suzanne Wright and Gargi Cooper have each decided to run for a second, three-year term on the school committee. They face a challenge from Melissa Camire, who will also appear on the ballot for the April 25 local election.

Camire, who has lived in Swampscott for the past five years, said she would bring a unique perspective to the committee, because she has a six-year-old child in the school system and her partner teaches at Swampscott High School.

Camire wants to see more transparency among the committee. If elected, she said she would do more investigation into the budget and said there could have been more transparency and communication about why certain cuts were made.

Wright, in advocating for consistency, said there have been lots of leadership changes in recent years, both on the board and in the administration.

“For the first time in years, we have a school committee and a superintendent who are able to offer our students and the district staff a level of continuity and consistency of policy that has too often been lacking prior to this administration,” Wright said in a statement.

“Last year was the first time in nearly two decades that we saw a school committee that stayed intact for more than a single year. The constant turnover in the past created an inconsistency that presented a number of problems, not the least of which is having the same leadership from one teachers’ union contract to the following one,” Wright continued.

Cooper also cited the district leadership and school committee turnover prior to her time on the board.

“This lack of consistency has caused the district great difficulties in gaining traction on many important initiatives, including addressing mental health support and technology needs,” Cooper said in a statement. “I am proud to contribute to the district strategic plan that places the emotional and behavioral safety of our students at the forefront.

“I would like to see the mental health initiatives (SWIFT and Harbor programs) that were introduced into the high school this year expand to our middle school because they will provide our children with the support needed to address the needs of students reentering school after absences, due to serious mental health challenges or medical illness,” Cooper continued.

Affordable housing for seniors on the agenda

Wright said she also wants to see them expand to the middle school. She said the need for both mental health initiatives is unquestionable and the difference they are making for students is undeniable. Wright also wants to continue work on a district-wide technology plan to benefit students.

Camire said she disagrees with the continuity argument. She said both candidates had a chance to effect change in their three years, and their plans should already be underway. She said the district should start looking into a panel of parents, students and educators to hire the next high school principal. She said the turnover in administration needs to stop and people need to be hired who “fit our vision for what we want the Swampscott school district to become.”

Camire said the schools are “crumbling around us” and some are not ADA compliant, and there seems to be no technology budget. She is for school consolidation for the lower grades, rather than smaller neighborhood schools, arguing that at just 13,000 residents, Swampscott is already a neighborhood.

“We need to start making that forward progress towards stronger schools for a stronger community,” Camire said.  

Cooper cited her work as chairwoman of the Joint Facilities Task Force, saying that she led the school system to work with town administration to strengthen Swampscott’s infrastructure and improve efficiencies. She said hiring a joint facilities director, a shared position between town government and the school department, has made the district become proactive.

“Our current school board has been working collaboratively and has been able to drive our district forward,” Cooper said in a statement. “Continuity on the board is paramount to continuing our district’s positive momentum. With the knowledge and experience I have gained over these past three years, I am truly invested and committed to bring these and many other much-needed initiatives to completion.”

In addition to her role on the school committee, Cooper said she remains involved in the public schools as a parent and PTA volunteer. She works as a nurse practitioner and runs the medical outreach program out of the Lynn Community Health Center that provides medical care to the homeless in Lynn.

Wright said her four children have all been educated through Swampscott Public Schools.

“If we are going to have the kind of public schools that Swampscott residents expect and are paying for, we need to provide stable, even-handed vision that lasts beyond each year’s election,” Wright said in a statement.

“Right now, there is a healthy diversity of skills, personalities and opinions on the school committee,” Wright continued. “We work well together and respectfully challenge each other and the school administration to make sure we are doing the best we can for the students. We are committed to tackling issues large and small, including the tough financial issues we need to solve. We are seeing results.”


Gayla Cawley can be reached at gcawley@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @GaylaCawley.

Spanish among community program offerings

By BRIDGET TURCOTTE

LYNN — Lynn Community Enrichment Program’s winter session will begin on Feb. 13.

Courses were originally set to begin next week but were pushed back a week for organizational reasons, said Program Coordinator Tony Dunn.

The night classes are held at Lynn Vocational Technical Institute on Commercial Street on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Among several offerings, Magalie Rowe, an instructor who is originally from Peru, will teach a six-week Conversational Spanish Course for people who operate a business in a diverse community like Lynn, teachers, community leaders and students. The program costs $60.

Rowe will teach common phrases and the basics of the language to English speakers. She has worked as a professor at Boston College and the University of New Hampshire; her almae matres.

Dunn said most of the people enrolled in the class, which meets every Tuesday for two hours, are teachers in the Lynn Public School system who want to improve communication with parents.

“The teachers say ‘I have a classroom and 90 percent of my students are Hispanic but I don’t know how to speak Spanish,’” Rowe said. “There’s a big need for them to study Spanish and know a little bit about the culture.”

Rowe, who teaches full-time at the city’s public schools, argued that understanding some of the culture of their students is just as important as gaining communication tools.

Dunne said the core of the program is aligned with the values of the organization, which has been in operation for two years.

“We wanted to open up Lynn Tech and the resources there to the greater Lynn community and offer as much content as we can,” Dunn said. “We’re an enrichment program so we do things that enrich people’s lives. We offer classes that are vocational or just enjoyable. We have a variety of courses.”

In its first session two years ago, more than 100 people enrolled in 14 classes.

LCEP offers other programs including a citizenship course that teaches U.S. history and citizen testing requirements to immigrants and a six-week course on the history of the city of Lynn.

An introduction to the internet class instructs students to send and receive emails and search and browse websites. Specialized courses offer an education on basic electrical and oil burner operation; carpentry and cake decorating. Computer applications is also taught in Spanish on Monday and Wednesday nights.

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Bridget Turcotte can be reached at bturcotte@itemlive.com. Follow her on Twitter @BridgetTurcotte.

Love Abounds with Salvy the Florist

Photos at Salvy the Florist on Western Ave. including Salvy M. (the owner) and some of their arrangements for Valentine’s Day.  A dozen roses will be sent to Item readers, Kristen and Bill of Lynn, for sharing their tips on a healthy marriage.  Special thanks to all who participated and to Salvy the Florist for the award.

SPONSORED BY SALVY THE FLORIST.

Love is in the air’ at Salvy the Florist this weekend in honor of Valentine’s Day.  While Salvy’s has been preparing hundreds of roses, bouquets, teddy bears, and other arrangements to celebrate the holiday, they have also been asking Item readers for their tips on what makes a healthy marriage.

We’ve received many notable heartfelt responses that we would like to share in honor of this special day of love.

“Always make each other laugh,” is the wisdom from Diane H. who also said her husband of 35 years is her best friend.

Donna D. who has been married for 10 years, recommends: “Give more than you take…keep expectations low and faith high, and love unconditionally.”

Lynn A.F., married for 34 years offers, “Always build each other up and be kind to one another.”

While Nella G. gives us the advice, “I have been married to my husband for 40 years.  It’s a lot of work, but if you are honest with each other, care for each other, and listen to each other, it all works out. Keep your faith in GOD!”

John G. says, “Work as a team.”

Ron B. provides these sage words, “Listen to each other.  What you have to say is just as important as what they have to say! Listen, don’t just wait to talk.”

Finally, Kristen M. B., married to Bill, 15 years this coming May, shared the most important piece of advice she has found in her relationship.  Interestingly, Kristen met her husband on a blind date set up after her late father met Bill’s father and introduced them.

Kristen tells us, “Our first year of marriage was a huge lesson for us: we bought a house and lived together once we got married, (we both had lived at home with our parents prior [to that]).  So, that first year was an eye opener for both of us. We had some downs, but plenty of ups, too.
The best tip/advice is COMMUNICATION.  Without talking and LISTENING to each other, you have nothing to appreciate from each other. You need to respect whatever the other is saying even if you do not agree.  Don’t shut them out for being themselves and having their own opinions.”

One thing that every couple seemed to agree on is that marriage takes effort by both individuals in the relationship.  Each of these couples are committed to working on their partnerships and being there to support one another.  Everyone, single, in a partnership, engaged, married, or otherwise, can benefit from being considerate to others.  This is true in any type of relationship, not only romantic ones.  Hopefully, this Valentine’s Day, these couples’ remarks will lead you to pause and think: “How can I give the best of myself to the people I love?”

Love Abounds with Salvy the Florist

Photos at Salvy the Florist on Western Ave. including Salvy M. (the owner) and some of their arrangements for Valentine’s Day.  A dozen roses will be sent to Item readers, Kristen and Bill of Lynn, for sharing their tips on a healthy marriage.  Special thanks to all who participated and to Salvy the Florist for the award.

SPONSORED BY SALVY THE FLORIST.

Love is in the air’ at Salvy the Florist this weekend in honor of Valentine’s Day.  While Salvy’s has been preparing hundreds of roses, bouquets, teddy bears, and other arrangements to celebrate the holiday, they have also been asking Item readers for their tips on what makes a healthy marriage.

We’ve received many notable heartfelt responses that we would like to share in honor of this special day of love.

“Always make each other laugh,” is the wisdom from Diane H. who also said her husband of 35 years is her best friend.

Donna D. who has been married for 10 years, recommends: “Give more than you take…keep expectations low and faith high, and love unconditionally.”

Lynn A.F., married for 34 years offers, “Always build each other up and be kind to one another.”

While Nella G. gives us the advice, “I have been married to my husband for 40 years.  It’s a lot of work, but if you are honest with each other, care for each other, and listen to each other, it all works out. Keep your faith in GOD!”

John G. says, “Work as a team.”

Ron B. provides these sage words, “Listen to each other.  What you have to say is just as important as what they have to say! Listen, don’t just wait to talk.”

Finally, Kristen M. B., married to Bill, 15 years this coming May, shared the most important piece of advice she has found in her relationship.  Interestingly, Kristen met her husband on a blind date set up after her late father met Bill’s father and introduced them.

Kristen tells us, “Our first year of marriage was a huge lesson for us: we bought a house and lived together once we got married, (we both had lived at home with our parents prior [to that]).  So, that first year was an eye opener for both of us. We had some downs, but plenty of ups, too.
The best tip/advice is COMMUNICATION.  Without talking and LISTENING to each other, you have nothing to appreciate from each other. You need to respect whatever the other is saying even if you do not agree.  Don’t shut them out for being themselves and having their own opinions.”

One thing that every couple seemed to agree on is that marriage takes effort by both individuals in the relationship.  Each of these couples are committed to working on their partnerships and being there to support one another.  Everyone, single, in a partnership, engaged, married, or otherwise, can benefit from being considerate to others.  This is true in any type of relationship, not only romantic ones.  Hopefully, this Valentine’s Day, these couples’ remarks will lead you to pause and think: “How can I give the best of myself to the people I love?”