Cigarettes

Wayne Alarm: Fire system up to code?

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

At Wayne Alarm, we always make sure our customers and clients are fully prepared in case of any emergency. And with warmer weather fast approaching, it is important to make sure your fire system is still reliable, inspected, tested and maintained. A quarterly check on your system can make a huge difference in your safety. So how can homeowners or business owners keep their systems updated? Follow these tips below:

  • Make sure Wayne Alarms fire system is up to date with its detection alarm. Without this feature, the system would fail to notify you if smoke appears or to dispatch the firefighters to save your home and evacuate your family.
  • Check your fire exits to make sure doors easily open and no objects are blocking the exits. It’s also important to ensure that it is properly marked and everyone will have no trouble finding it.
  • Make sure there are no flammable objects or substances in or near the exits. If so, it is best to store them away in the right place to prevent any fire.

On average, there are over 374,000 residential fires and over 2,000 deaths. Don’t let yourself become a statistic. These additional tips could make a huge difference to avoid any fire.

  • Smoking – If you smoke, make sure you do so in areas where it is not prohibited. Or if you smoke, make sure it is only fire-safe cigarettes. Since fires and deaths result from fires that have started in a living/family rooms, or bedrooms, it is better to smoke outside instead. Most importantly, keep lighters, matches and cigarettes out of reach of children.
  • Electrical – When using electrical kitchen appliances make sure they are put into a receptacle outlet one at a time, as the outlet can dangerously heat up.

Call us today to schedule for a free in-home consultation.

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“Here yesterday… Here today…Here tomorrow.”

www.waynealarm.com

Wayne Alarm: Fire system up to code?

SAFETY TIP OF THE DAY

SPONSORED BY WAYNE ALARM AND HONEYWELL.

At Wayne Alarm, we always make sure our customers and clients are fully prepared in case of any emergency. And with warmer weather fast approaching, it is important to make sure your fire system is still reliable, inspected, tested and maintained. A quarterly check on your system can make a huge difference in your safety. So how can homeowners or business owners keep their systems updated? Follow these tips below:

  • Make sure Wayne Alarms fire system is up to date with its detection alarm. Without this feature, the system would fail to notify you if smoke appears or to dispatch the firefighters to save your home and evacuate your family.
  • Check your fire exits to make sure doors easily open and no objects are blocking the exits. It’s also important to ensure that it is properly marked and everyone will have no trouble finding it.
  • Make sure there are no flammable objects or substances in or near the exits. If so, it is best to store them away in the right place to prevent any fire.

On average, there are over 374,000 residential fires and over 2,000 deaths. Don’t let yourself become a statistic. These additional tips could make a huge difference to avoid any fire.

  • Smoking – If you smoke, make sure you do so in areas where it is not prohibited. Or if you smoke, make sure it is only fire-safe cigarettes. Since fires and deaths result from fires that have started in a living/family rooms, or bedrooms, it is better to smoke outside instead. Most importantly, keep lighters, matches and cigarettes out of reach of children.
  • Electrical – When using electrical kitchen appliances make sure they are put into a receptacle outlet one at a time, as the outlet can dangerously heat up.

Call us today to schedule for a free in-home consultation.

Item live-3

“Here yesterday… Here today…Here tomorrow.”

www.waynealarm.com

Lynn might bump smoking age to 21

By THOMAS GRILLO

LYNN – The city is considering raising the legal age for buying tobacco to 21, setting a new bar for public health.

“I like the idea,” said Michele Desmarais, Lynn’s public health director. “We need to combat TV ads that suggest smoking is cool and we just want our teens to be healthier.”

The Board of Health will consider a proposal Tuesday at City Hall to increase the age to purchase tobacco products from 18.

So far, 145 Bay State communities have adopted the proposal. There’s a bill on Beacon Hill that would raise the age statewide to 21.

A 2015 report by the National Academy of Medicine concluded that raising the tobacco sale age to 21 will enhance public health and save lives.

The study found that raising the tobacco sale age will reduce the number of teens who start smoking; reduce smoking-caused deaths; and improve the health of adolescents. About 95 percent of adult smokers began smoking before they turned 21, the survey said.

Proponents argue increasing the tobacco age will counter the industry’s efforts to target young people at a critical time when many go from experimenting with tobacco to regular smoking.

Christine Neals, communications manager for the Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce, said the organization has not taken a position on the issue.

But Jon Hurst, president of the Retailers Association of Massachusetts, said his members oppose raising the age.

“Tobacco is a legal product, let consumers and stores decide what they want to buy and sell,” he said. “On the North Shore, smokers already drive a short distance to buy cigarettes in New Hampshire. If Massachusetts raises the age, more sales will leave the community.”

Big names at fundraiser for Northeast Arc

Sam Vitali, a Lynn attorney who represents the Mobil station on Chestnut Street, said while merchants are not opposed to raising the age to 21 they will fight two other proposals. One would ban the sale of so-called blunt wraps. Similar to a cigarette rolling paper, they are made of tobacco.

“Why should the Board of Health prevent you from buying a product that is legal today,”  Vitali said.

In addition, he is against another plan that would restrict prices of cigars. Under the new rule, a merchant could not sell single cigars for less than $5.

“Today, I can buy a nip at a liquor store for 99 cents, but I would not be able to buy a $1 cigar,” he said. “It’s totally inconsistent.”

Joyce Redford, director of the North Shore/Cape Ann Tobacco Policy Program said she favors the measure because 18-year-old high schoolers would no longer be able to buy cigarettes and influence their younger classmates.

“It would remove that 18-year-old from high school and make cigarettes less available to eighth and ninth graders,” she said.


Thomas Grillo can be reached at tgrillo@itemlive.com.